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Privilege of Franking. Letters and packets to and from the following officers of the government, are by law received and conveyed by post, free of postage.

The President and Vice-President of the United States ; Secretaries of State, Treasury, War, and Navy ; Attorney General; Post-master General and Assistant Post-master General; Comptrollers, Auditors, Register, and Solicitor of the Treasury ; Treasurer ; Commissioner of the General Land Office; Commissioners of the Navy Board; Commissary General ; Inspectors General ; Quartermaster General ; Paymaster General; Superintendent of Patent Office; Speaker and Clerk of the House of Representatives; President and Secretary of the Senate ; and any individual who shall have been, or may hereafter be, President of the United States; and each may receive newspapers by post, free of postage.

Each member of the Senate, and each member and delegate of the House of Representatives, may send and receive, free of postage, news. papers, letters, and packets, weighing not more than two ounces, (in case of excess of weight, excess alone to be paid for,) and all documents printed by order of either House, during and sixty days before and after each session of Congress.

Post-masters may send and receive, free of postage, letters and packets not exceeding half an ounce in weight; and they may receive one daily newspaper, each, or what is equivalent thereto.

Printers of newspapers may send one paper to each and every other printer of newspapers within the United States, free of postage, under such regulations as the Post-master General may provide.

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Germany and the Baltic

85,000,000 France, Spain, Portugal, and the Mediterranean

60,000,000 The United States

50,000,000 Present yearly consumption

lbs. 305,000,000 The stocks of coffee in Europe, Dec. 31, 1830, were lbs. 80,000,000 Do. do. in the United States, less than

10,000,000

Together 90,000,000 Whole growth of 1831

250,000,000

lbs. 340,000,000 Consumption in Europe and America, 1831

305,000,000 Estimated stocks in Europe and America at end of year 35,000,000 Of which there will be locked up in the United States 20,000,000 Leaving in all Europe, 31st Dec. 1831, only

lbs. 15,000,000 The growth of coffee has yearly decreased from five to eight million pounds since 1828 (when it was greatest), and must continue to decrease two or three years more. It cannot be much increased until three or four years after the price reaches 10 or 12 dollars in the West Indies. The very low price of sugar in all countries adds to the increase of coffee consumption.

Import. Consumed. (1826 153,000,000 141,000,000

1827 202,000,000 181,000,000 Import of coffee in Europe* 1828 210,000,000 205,000,000

1829 202,000,000 214,000,000

1830 198,000,000 228,000,000 The increase of production of coffee from 1826 to 1830, was 30 per cent. The increase of consumption from 1826 to 1830, was 60 per cent. The increase of production has stopped, while the increase of consumption

goes on and will go on, till checked by high prices. In 1816 coffee in Hamburg was 6mk. bco. per lb. being 12 cents per lb. 1817 it rose in Hamburg to 8

being 16 cts. 1818 it rose in Hamburg to 16

being 33 cts. It thence gradually fell to

12

being 25 cts. And did not go below 10 (till after 1824) beirg 20 cts. Coffee continued to fall in Hamburg till 1830, when it was worth 34 mk. bco. per lb.

being about 7 cents per lb. In February 1831, it was worth 4imk. bco.

about 9 cents. And had not then reached by 30 per cent. the price from which it started

in 1816.

Estimated Stocks of Coffee in Europe. In 1825 December 31st, were

1826 1827 1828 1829

1830 And as shown in the foregoing will be in 1831, only

lbs. 74,000,000

87,000,000 107,000,000 121,500,000 109,700,000 80,000,000 15,000,000

* By Europe is meant the Netherlands, England, France, Hamburg, Bremen, Coponbagen, St. Petersburg, and Trieste.

XVI. COLLEGES IN THE

New York,

do.

Name.
Place.

Presidents.

Foun

ded. 1 Bowdoin, Brunswick, Me. William Allen, D. D.

1794 Waterville, do. 2 Waterville,

Jeremiah Chaplin, D. D. 1820 Dartmouth, Hanover, N. H. Nathan Lord, D. D.

1770 4 Univ. of Vermont, Burlington,

Vt.
James Marsh, D.D.

1791 5 Middlebury, Midd!eburý, do. Joshua Bates, D. D.

1800 6 Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass. Josiah Quincy, LL. D. 1638 Willians,

Williamstown, do. Edward D. Griffin, D. D. 1793 8 Amherst,

Amherst, do. Heman Humphrey, D. D. 1821 9 Brown University, Providence, R. I. Francis Wayland, D. D. 1764 10 Yale, New llaven, Con. Jeremiah Day, D. D.

1700 11 Washington,

Hartford,

do. Nathaniel S. Wheaton, A.M. 1826 12 Wesleyan University,

Middletown,
do. Wilbur Fisk, D. D.

1831 13 Columbia,

N. Y. William A. Ducr, LL. D. 1754 114 Union,

Schenectady,

do.
Eliplalet Nott, D. D.

1795 15 Hamilton,

Clinton,

do.
Spencer

1812 16 Geneva,

Geneva,

do. Richard S. Mason, D. D. 1823 17 College of New Jersey, Princeton, N. J. James Carnahan, D. D.

1746 18 Rutgers,

N. Brunswick,

do.

Philip Milledoller, D. D. 1770 19 University of Pennsyl. Philadelphia, Penn. W. H. De Lancey, D.D. 1755 20 Dickirison,

Carlisle,
do Samuel B. How, D. D.

1783 21 Jefferson,

Canonsburg, do. Matthew Brown, D. D. 1802 22 Western University, Pittsburg,

do. Robert Bruce, D. D.

1820 23 Washington, Washiogton, do. David McConaughly,

1806 24 Allegheny,

Meadville,

do. Timothy Alden, D.D. 1815 25 Madison, Union Town, do. Henry B. Bascom,

1829 26 St. Mary's,* Baltimore, Md. Samuel Eccleston,

1799 27 University of Maryland,

Do.
do. Charles Williams, D. D.

! 1812 28 St. John's,

Annapolis,

llector Ilumphreys, A. M. 1 1784 29 Mount St. Mary's,* Ncar Eminitsburg, do. John B. Purcell,

1830 30 Columbian,

Washingion, Ca. Stephen Chapin, D. D. 1821 31 Georgetown, Georgetown, D.C. Thomas F. Mulledy,

1799 32 William and Mary, Williamsburg, Va. I Adam Empic, D. D.

1693 33 Hampden-Sydney, Prince Ed. Co. do. J. P. Cushing, 4. M.

1774 34 Washington, Lexington, do.

Marshall, M. D. 1812 35 University of Virginia, Charlottesville, do. Prof. Patterson, Chairman, 1819 30 Randolph Macon College Boydton, do. John Emory, D. D.

1831 37 Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel llill, N. C. Joseph Caldwell, D. D. 1791 38 Charleston, Charleston, S.C. Jasper Adams, D. D.

1785 39 College of S. Carolina, Columbia, do. Thomas Cooper, M. D. 1804 40 University of Georgia, Athens,

Ga. Alonzo Church, D. D.

1785 41 Alabama University, Tuscaloosa, Ala. Alva Woods, D. D.

1828 42 Jefferson,

Washington, Mi. E. B. Williston, A. M. 1802 13 Louisiana,

Jackson,

La. Jeremialı Chamberlain, D.D. 14 Greenville, Greenville, Tenn. Henry Hoss, Esq.

1794 45 University of Nashville, Nashville, do. Philip Lindsley, D. D. 1806 46 East Tennessee, Knoxville, do. Charles Coffin, D. D. 17 Transylvania, Lexington, Ken.

1798 48 Centre,

Danville,
do. John C. Young,

1822 49 Augusta,

Augusta,
do. Martin Ruter, D. D.

1823 50 Cumberland, Princeton, do. F. R. Cossit,

1825 51 St. Joseph's,* Bardstown, do. George A. M. Elder,

1819 52 Georgetown,

Georgetown,
do. Joel Š. Bacon,

1830 53 University of Ohio, Athens, Ohio. Robert G. Wilson, D.D. 1802 54 Miami University, Oxford,

do. R. II. Bishop, D. D.

1824 55 Western Reserve, Hudson,

do.
Charles B. Storrs,

1826 156 Kenyon,

Gambier,

do. Philander Chase, D.D. 1828 57 Franklin,

New Athens, do. William M.Millan, A. M. 1824 58 Indiana, Bloomington, Ind. Andrew Wylie, D. D.

1827 59 Illinois,

Jacksonville, Il. Edward Beecher, A, M. 1830 601St. Louis,*

St. Louis,

Mo.
P.J. Verhaegen,

1829

* Catholic Colleges : a large part of the students in these belong to the preparatory de partment. There is a Catholic College at Mobile, and one at Cincinnati, of which no statistics have been received.

UNITED STATES.

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20

Inst-
No. of

Vols. in Vols.in
ruct- No. of Minis- Stud- College Studt's

Commencement.
ers. Alumni ters.

ents.t Library. Librari.
6 415 39 156 8,500 5,500 First Wednesday in Sept.
5 70 35 59 2,500 600 Last Wednesday in July.
10 2,303 530

178 6,000 8,000 Last Wed. but one in August.
4 182

36 1,000 500 First Wednesday in August.
5 546 205 99 1,846 2,322 Third Wednesday in August.
24 5,685 1,424 236 35,000 4,600 Last Wednesday in August.

7 721 215 115 2,550 2,000 Third Wednesday in August.
10 208 52 197 2,380 4,515 Fourth Wednesday in August.

6 1,182 442 114 6,100 6,000 First Wednesday in September.
15 4,470 1,267 346 8,500 ! 9,000 Third Wednesday in August.
9 25

70 5,000 | 1,200 First Wednesday in August.
5
9 1,100

100 8,000 6,000 First Tuesday in August.
9 1,373 268 205 5,150 8,450 Fourth Wednesday in July.
6 189

93 2,900 3,000 Fourth Wednesday in August.
6 15

6 31 500 900 First Wednesday in August.
10 1,930 406 105 8,000 4,000 Last Wednesday in September.
5
70

Third Wednesday in August.
9
125

Last day, not Sunday, in July,
4

21 2,000 5,000 Fourth Wednesday in September. 7 341 136 120 700 1,800 Last Thursday in September. 45 13 53

50 Last Friday in June. 143 26

47

400 525 Last Thursday in Septenber
9
6 8,000

First Wednesday in July.
70

July 15th.
18

147
10,000

Third Tuesday in July.
11

Third Wednesday in July,
5 636
76

Second Wednesday in February.
25 12
130 7,000

Last week in June.
4
50 4,000

Fourth Wednesday in December.
19
140 7,000

Near the last of July.
7

60 3,600 600 July 4th.
5+

Fourth Wednesday in September.
380
9 23

700

1,500 Third Wednesday in April. 538

130

8,000
434

69 1,800 3,000 Fourth Thursday in June.
27
3 61

3,000 1,000 Last Tuesday in October.
490 11 111 8,000

31 Monday after 4th Mon. in Nov. 256 16 114 2,000 2,250 First Wednesday in August.

100
1,000

Third Wednesday in December.
10

160

2,100

30 31 32

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36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 43 49 50 51 52 53 51 55 56 57 58 59 60

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32 95 21 141 66 98 57 150 75 57 82 25

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3,500

Third Wednesday in September. 2,500 750 First Wednesday in October.

340 200 First Wednesday in October. 2,350 1,500 Last Wednesday in September. 1,258 108 July 4th. 1,500 550 Thursday after 1st Wed, in Aug. 1,000

600 Second Thursday in September.
1,300 1st August.

500
1,000 1,000 Wed. after 3d Tuesday in Sept.
1,000 1,200 Last Wednesday in September.
1,000 100 Fourth Wednesday in August.

Fourth Wednesday in September. 182

50 Last Wednesday in September.
600
1,200

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40

4

35 125

| Undergraduates, not including modical, theological, and law students.

VACATIONS IN COLLEGES.

Bowjoin.

1. Com., 3 weeks ;-2. Friday after 3d Wed. Dec., 8 weeks ;-3. Fri

day after 3d Wed. May, 2 weeks. Waterville. 1. Com., 4 weeks ;-2. Last Wed. Nov., 9 weeks. Dartmouth. 1. Com., 6 weeks ;-2. last Mon. Dec., 6 1-2 weeks ;-3. Thursday

preceding the last Wed. May, 21-2 weeks. Vermont Univ. 1. Com., 4 weeks ;-2. 1st Wed. Jan., 8 weeks. Middlebury. 1. Com., 4 weeks ;-2. Ist Wed. Jan., 7 weeks ;-3. 3d Wed. May,

2 weeks. Harvard.

1. Wed. preceding 25th Dec., 2 weeks ;-2. Ist Wed. April, 2 weeks;

-3. preceding Commencement, 6 weeks. Williams. 1. Com., 4 weeks ;-2. Wed. after 4th Wed. Dec. 6 weeks ;-3. 3d

Wed. May, 8 weeks. Amberst.

1. Com., 4 weeks ;-2. 4th Wed. Dec., 6 weeks ;–3. 2d Wed. May,

3 weeks. Brown.

1. Com., 4 weeks ;-2. last Friday in Dec., 6 weeks ;-3.2d Friday in

May, 3 weeks. Yale.

1. Com., 6 weeks ;–2. 2d Wed. Jan., 2 weeks ;—3. Ist Wed. May, 4

weeks. Washington. 1. Com., 6 weeks ;-2. Thurs. before Christmas, 2 weeks ;-3. Thuis

day before 20 April, 3 weeks. Columbia.

1. Com. to the 1st Monday in October. Union.

1. Com., 7 weeks ;-2. in Dec. 3 or 4 weeks ;-3. in April, 3 weeks. Camilton. 1. Com., 6 weeks ;—2. 20 Wed. Jan., 3 weeks ;-3.2d Wed. May, 4

weeks. Gedeva.

1. Com., 5 weeks ;-2. at Christmas and New Year, 2 weeks ;-3. in

April, 3 weeks. College of N.J.

1. Com., 6 weeks ;-2. 1st Thurs. after 2d Tues. April, 6 weeks. Rutgers.

1. Com. to Sept. 15 ;-2. Dec. 21 to Jan. 7 ;-3. April 7 to May 1. Penn. University. 1. Com., 6 weeks ;–2. 2 weeks ;–3. 2 weeks. Dickinson, 1. In Sept. and Oct., 5 weeks ;-2. in April and May 5 weeks. Jefferson.

1. Month of October ;-2. Month of May. Madison.

1. Com., 6 weeks ;-2. Dec. 25th to Jan 15. Washington. 1. Month of October ;2. Month of May. Western Univ. 1. July and August. Univ. Maryland. 1, Com. to 2d Mond. Sept. ;–2. Dec. 24 to Jan. 2.;-3. Wed. before

Easter to lst Wed. aster.
Mt. St. Mary's. 1. Com. to the 15th August.
Columbian. 1. Com. to 21 Wed. Jan. ;-2. 2d Wed. June to 20 July.
William and Mary. 1. Com. to the last Monday in October.
Hamp. Sydney. 1. Month of October ;-2. Month of May.
Washington. 1. Com. to 3d Wed. May ;-2. 3d Wed. Oct. to 3d Wed. Nov.
Univ. Virginia, 1. July 20 to September 1.
Univ. N. Čarolina. 1. Com., 6 weeks ;--2. Dec. 15, 4 weeks.
Charleston. 1. Month of December ;-2. in April, 3 weeks.
Coll. S. Carolina. 1. July 1 to the 1st Monday in October.
Univ. of Georgia. 1. Com., 1 week ;-2. Wed. before 2d Mond. Nov. to Jan. 1; -3.

April 1 to April 15.
Oniv, Alabama. 1. 4th Wednesday in July to 1st Wednesday in October.
Greenville.

1. Com., 5 weeks ;-2. 3d Wed. March, 5 weeks. Nashville,

1. Com., 5 1-2 weeks ;-2. 1st Wed. April, 5 1-2 weeks.
E. Tennessee. 1. Com., 4 weeks :-2. 1st Thursday April, 4 weeks.
Transylvania. 1. Com. to 1st Mond. Nov. ;-2. 2d Mond. March, 6 weeks.
Centre.

1. Com. to 1st Mond. Sept. ;-2. a recess in March. Augusta.

1. Com. 6 weeks ;-2. in Feb. 21 weeks from 1st vacation, 4 weeks. Cumberland. 1. Com. to the last day of October. St. Joseph's. 1. 1st August till 15th September. University of Ohio. 1. Com., 6 weeks ;2. 2d Tues. April, 4 weeks. Miami.

1. Com. to 1st Mo. Nov.;--2. last Wed. March to 1st Monday in May. Western Reserve. 1. Com., 5 weeks ; -2.2d Wed. Jan., 2 weeks. Indiana.

1. Month of May ;-2. Month of October.

EXPLANATION. Vacations of Bowdoin College ; Ist, from Commencement, 3 weeks , 420, from the Friday after the 3d Wednesduy in December, 8 weeks ;-3d, from the Friday after the 3d Wednesday in May, 2 weeks,

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