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Dunstan, Archbishop of Canter-

bury, 34.

Demeter, 454.
Democracy, modern, the rise of,

279 ff.; and the age of revolu-
tion, 284; 305; Burns and,
311; Wordsworth and, 322,
in the age of Victoria, 370,

438.
Denis Duval, 419.
De Quincey, Thomas, 184; 241;

326; 344–345; 400.
Descriptive Sketches, 316.
Deserted Village, The, 300, 301.
Dickens, Charles, 377; 411; 412–

417; 419; 427.
Don Juan, 350.
Don Quixote, 412.
Donne, John, 185; 186–188; 210.
Dora, 456.
Dove Cottage, 318.
Drama, religious, 97; 138; before

Shakespeare, 136; prepara-
tion for the Elizabethan, 137;
miracle plays, 139; moralities,
140; interludes, 140; regular
drama, 142; patriotism and
the, 143; Shakespeare's prede-
cessors in, 143; later Eliza-
bethan, 179; decline of, 183;
general survey, 183; influence
of Goldsmith on, in 18th cen-

tury, 300.
Dramatic poetry, 173 n.
Drummond, William, 170.
Dryden, John, 225–231 (life, 226;

as dramatist, 227; satires and
other works, 228; later years,
229; his work in prose and
verse, 230]; his influence, 233;

247; 250; 285.
Dunbar, William, 92.
Dunciad, The, 243-244; 245.

Earthly Paradise, The, 442.
Ecclesiastical History of the

English People, by Bede, 24;
translated by King Alfred, 31;

used by Layamon, 48.
Edinburgh Review, The, 379; 388.
Edward II, by Christopher Mar-

lowe, 143; 146.
Edwin Drood, 417.
Eikonoclastes, 193.
Elegy in a Country Churchyard,

297; 298.
Eliot, George, 411; 422-429.
Elizabeth, Queen, 109; 113; 119;

120-121; 131.
Emerson, R. W., 136; 404.
Endymion, 362; 363; 364; 367.
England, the land of the Angles,

8; settled by the Angles, Sax-
ons, and Jutes, 8; invaded
by the Danes, 26; saved by
Alfred, 28; of the 14th cen-
tury, 54-61; rapid develop-
ment of in the 16th century,
113; unity of in Elizabeth's
time, 120; expansion of her
trade, 122; Milton's England,
173-179; complexity of the age,
178; Restoration --, 219-232;
expansion of, in the 18th cen-
tury, 283, 305; industrial and
social changes, 284; and the
French Revolution, 312–313,
346–347; of Victoria's reign,
369–377; expansion of, in age
of Victoria, 370, 375. See also
ENGLISH LANGUAGE, ENGLISH
PEOPLE, ENGLISH LITERATURE.

207;

English Bards and Scotch Re-

viewers, 349.
English Dictionary, The, by Dr.

Johnson, 288.
English Humourists, Lectures on

the, 409; 421.
English Language: Alfred, the

founder of English prose, 30;
French supplants it among
upper classes, 41; modified by
French influence, 43; triumphs
over the French in England,
46; East-Midland English be-
comes supreme in Chaucer's
time, 62; rise of English prose
in 14th century, 62; the music
of Chaucer's English, 80;
Elizabethan prose, 165; seven-
teenth-century prose,
development of prose in Dry-
den's time, 224; Dryden's
contribution to English prose,
230; rise of the new prose in
18th century, 246; 250; 273;
prose-writers of Victorian age,

399–401.
English Literature, from the

beginning to King Alfred, 12–
26; Beowulf, 13–17; Chris-
tian literature, 17; Latin prose
and the work of Bede, 22–26;
from King Alfred to the Nor-
man Conquest, 26–36; sum-
mary of the Old English
period, 35; effects of the
Norman Conquest on, 41, 43;
literature after the Norman
Conquest, 44; Latin Chron-
icles, 44; Celtic influence on,
44; romances, 46, 49; revival
of, after Norman Conquest,

47; medieval songs, 51; age
of Chaucer, 54-82; literature
in the 14th century, 61; rise
of English prose, 62; songs
and ballads, 92–97; religious
drama, 97; prelude to the
age of Elizabeth, 109–118;
the Renaissance in litera-
ture, 110; culmination of the
Renaissance, 119–169; later
Elizabethan literature, 179;
non-dramatic poetry of the
early 17th century, 185;
seventeenth-century prose,
207; period of the French
influence, 219–278; domi-
nated by classical standards,
224; prose-writers of the early
18th century, 250-273; the
beginning of modern litera-
ture, 279–368; literature after
the death of Pope, 285–291;
the new spirit in literature,
291 ff. (return to Nature, 291;
new sympathy with man, 292;
children and home-life, 292;
return to poetic manner of
the Elizabethans, 293; a new
world of the imagination,
293; summary, 305); in the
reign of Victoria, 376; 401;
the Victorian novel, 409–
437; Victorian poetry, 437–
461; the Pre-Raphaelites, 438.
See also ENGLISH LANGUAGE

and English RENAISSANCE.
English People, the; their early

home, 1, 2; Angles, Saxons,
Jutes, 1, 2; early English life
and character, 2, 3; their
feast-halls, 3; the English vir-

tues, 4, 5; their religious Epic poetry, 173n. See BEO-
nature, 6; belief in Fate, 6, 7; WULF and PARADISE LOST.
they settle in Britain, 8; wars Erasmus, Desiderius, 104; 105.
with the Britons and among Essay on Criticism, 240.
themselves, 8; they become Essay on Man, 245.
Christianized, 9–11; the influ Essay on the Sublime and Beauti-
ence of Christian learning on, ful, 303.
11; intellectual development Essays, by Lord Bacon, 168;
in the age of Elizabeth, 121; periodical essays of Steele and
rise of, to the kingdom of Addison, 253, 258, 262; of
letters, 122; the Puritans, 174; Elia, 342; familiar, 343.
lax morality at Restoration, Essays of Elia, 341; 342–343.
220; growth of reading public Euphuism, 144.
in early 18th century, 248; Eve of St. Agnes, The, 363; 365;
society in coffee-houses, 249; 366.
development of democracy Eve of St. John, The, 332; 338.
and humanity in the 18th Evening Walk, An, 316.
century, 279 ff; changes in Everyman, 140.
life in the 19th century, 372– Every Man in his Humour, 180,
373.

181.
English Renaissance, period of Evolution, the theory of, 374;

the, 89–218; its coming to 459.
England, 89; delayed by the Excursion, The, 322.
Wars of the Roses, 90; end of
these wars, 103; new learning Faërie Queene, The, 132; 133–
at the universities, 104; Henry 135; 361.
VIII and his Court, 109; the Faithful Shepherdess, The, 182.
Renaissance in literature, 110; Far from the Madding Crowd,
poetry from Wyatt and Surrey 435.
to Spenser, 113; culmination Farquhar, George, 231.
of, 119–169; unity of the na Faustus, Doctor, 145; 146.
tion, 120; intellectual growth, Ferrex and Porrex, 45, 115–116;
121; joy of life, 122; Eliza 142.
bethan delight in life, 124; Fielding, Henry, 237; 273; 276–
Edmund Spenser, 127–136; 277; 279; 410; 412; 419.
the drama, 136–147; theaters, Fletcher, John, 179; 182.
147; Shakespeare, 152–165; Flight of a Tartar Tribe, The,
Elizabethan prose, 165–169; 345.
summary of Renaissance liter Florence of Worcester, Latin
ature, 169–172; decline of the, Chronicler, 44.
173–218.

For AThat and A' that, 311.

TION.

Fors Clavigera, 396.

Grace Abounding to the Chief of
Fortune Theatre, The, 148; 150. Sinners, 214; 216; 218.
France, An Ode, 331.

Gray, Thomas, 293, 297–298;
Frederick the Great, The Life of, 306.
388; 392.

Greene, Robert, 144.
Freedom of the Press, Milton Grocyn, William, 104; 110.

pleads for the, 199; granted Gulliver's Travels, 215; 265; 270.
by Parliament, 249.

Gutenberg, German printer, 87.
French influence, period of the, Guy Mannering, 334.

219–278; and the reign of com Guy of Warwick, 49.

mon sense, 222.
French Revolution, see REVOLU Hakluyt's Voyages, 170.

Hallam, Arthur, 453.
French Revolution, The, by Car Hamlet, 162.
lyle, 388; 390; 393.

Hardy, Thomas, 411; 434-436.

Harvey, Gabriel, 129.
Galahad, 456.

Hastings, essay by Macaulay,
Gammer Gurton's Needle, 142. 382.
Gardiner's Daughter, The, 456. Hathaway, Anne, 157.
Garrick, David, 287; 288. Havelok the Dane, 49.
Gascoigne, George, 114.

Hazlitt, William, 127; 323; 327;
Gentlemen's Magazine, The, 287. 341; 342; 343; 344.
Gentle Shepherd, The, 295. Hellas, 357.
Geoffrey of Monmouth, 45; Heminge and Condell, editors

King Lear, Ferrex and Porrex, of the first folio edition of
King Arthur, 45; 48.

Shakespeare's plays, 152.
Germ, The, 439.

Henry Esmond, 419; 421.
German Literature, influence of, Henry V, by Shakespeare, 150;

on Coleridge, 325; De Quincey 181.

and, 344; Carlyle and, 387. Henry VII, 110.
Giaour, The, 349.

Henry VIII, 105; 109; 110; 120.
Gibbon, Edward, 288.

Herbert, George, 185; 188-189.
Globe Theatre, The, 148; 163. Hereward the Wake, 430.
Godwin, William, 356.

Hero and Hero-Worship, 392.
Goldsmith, Oliver, 251; 263; Heroic couplet, the, 224; 293.

286; 288; 299–301; 306; 311; Herrick, Robert, 190–192; and
412.

Milton, 192.
Good-Natured Man, The, 300. Hesperides, 192.
Gorboduc, see Ferrex and Porrex. Hervé Riel, 448.
Gossip on Romance, A, 433. Heywood, John, 141.
Gower, John, 62; 78.

Heywood, Thomas, 184.

Iona, monastery of, 10.
It is Never too Late to Mend, 430.
Italian poetry, influence of, 71;

111.
Ivanhoe, 334.

Hilda, Abbess of the Monastery

at Streoneshalh, 19.
Hind and the Panther, The, 229.
History of Colonel Jack, The, 264.
History of England, 383.
History of the World, by Sir

Walter Raleigh, 207–208.
Holy War, The, 214.
Hooker, Richard, 165; 400.
Hours of Idleness, 349.
House of Fame, The, 72.
How they brought the Good News

from Ghent to Aix, 448.
Howard, Henry, Earl of Surrey,

111.
Humanity, development of, in

modern times, 279 ff. (new
spiritual growth, 280; the
rise of Methodism, 280; deeper
sympathy with man, 281, 292;
industrial and social changes,
284); in Goldsmith, Cowper,
and Crabbe, 299, 306; and

the French Revolution, 312.
Humphrey Clinker, 278.
Hunt, Leigh, 341; 343; 361.
Huxley, Thomas, 401.
Hydriotaphia, 210.
Hymn on the Morning of Christ's

Nativity, 196.
Hypatia, 430.
Hyperion, 363; 366.

James I, King of Scotland, 92.
Jane Eyre, 429.
Jarrow, monastery of, 23.
Jeffrey, Francis, 344.
Jew of Malta, The, 146.
John Inglesant, 430.
John, King of England, loses

possessions in France, 47.
Johnnie Armstrong, 95.
Johnson, essay by Macaulay,

382.
Johnson, Hester ("Stella"),

269; 271.
Johnson, Life of, by James Bos-

well, 286.
Johnson, Dr. Samuel, 152; 212;

244; 256; 258; 276; 285; 286-
291 (life, 286; London, 287;

as prose-writer, 290); 298.
Jonson, Ben, 153; 165; 172;

179–182; 185; 187; 288; 416.
Joseph Andrews, 277.
Journal, Scott's, 335.
Journal to Stella, 269.
Julius Cæsar, 161.
Jutes, the, 1; 2; they settle in

Kent, 8.

Idiot Boy, The, 322.
Idler, The, 290.
Idylls of the King, The, 460.
Il Penseroso, 193; 196.
In Memoriam, 438; 453; 454;

456.
Indian Serenade, The, 358.
Inner Temple, The, 340.

Keats, John, 358; 359-367

(Keats, Byron, and Shelley,
359; life, 359; Spenser's influ-
ence, 360; settles in London,
361; Leigh Hunt, 361; Endym-
ion, 362; rapid development,
363; love of beauty, 364;

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