The Writer, 37. sējums

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The Writer, 1925
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197. lappuse - This Agreement shall be binding upon and inure to the benefit of the parties hereto and their respective heirs, personal representatives, successors, and permitted assigns.
238. lappuse - By the rude bridge that arched the flood, Their flag to April's breeze unfurled, Here once the embattled farmers stood, And fired the shot heard round the world. The foe long since in silence slept; Alike the conqueror silent sleeps; And Time the ruined bridge has swept Down the dark stream which seaward creeps. On this green bank, by this soft stream, We set to-day a votive stone; That memory may their deed redeem, When...
30. lappuse - At bottom, it is the poet's first gift, as it is all men's, that he have intellect enough. He will be a poet if he have : a poet in word ; or failing that, perhaps still better, a poet in act. Whether he write at all; and if so, whether in prose or in verse, will depend on accidents — who knows on what extremely trivial accidents — perhaps on his having had a singing-master, on his being taught to sing in his boyhood...
92. lappuse - All in a hot and copper sky, The bloody Sun, at noon, Right up above the mast did stand, No bigger than the Moon. Day after day, day after day, We stuck, nor breath nor motion; As idle as a painted ship Upon a painted ocean.
174. lappuse - For the best American biography teaching patriotic and unselfish services to the people, illustrated by an eminent example, excluding, as too obvious, the names of George Washington and Abraham Lincoln, $1,000.
31. lappuse - ... boyhood ! But the faculty which enables him to discern the inner heart of things, and the harmony that dwells there (for whatsoever exists has a harmony in the heart of it, or it would not hold together and exist), is not the result of habits or accidents, but the gift of Nature herself ; the primary outfit for a Heroic Man in what sort soever. To the Poet, as to every other, we say first of all, See.
65. lappuse - For the original American play, performed in New York, which shall best represent the educational value and power of the stage in raising the standard of good morals, good taste, and good manners ($1,000).
93. lappuse - Mary had a little lamb, Its fleece was white as snow, And everywhere that Mary went, The lamb was sure to go.
30. lappuse - Whether he write at all; and if so, whether in prose or in verse, will depend on accidents: who knows on what extremely trivial accidents,— perhaps on his having had a singing-master, on his being taught to sing in his boyhood! But the faculty which enables him to discern the inner heart of things, and the harmony that dwells there (for whatsoever exists has a harmony in the heart of it, or it would not hold together and exist...
49. lappuse - World as what is original, distinctive, dramatic, romantic, thrilling, unique, curious, quaint, humorous, odd, apt to be talked about...

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