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THE SCARLET LETTER

BY

NATHANIEL HAWTHORNE

With Introductions from the Writings of Thomas
Wentworth Higginsôn and Edwin Percy Whipple

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HOUGHTON MIFFLIN COMPANY
BOSTON NEW YORK CHICAGO SAN FRANCISCO

The Riverside Press Cambridge

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CONTENTS

PAGE

9

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INTRODUCTION

I. HAWTHORNE: THE MAN AND THE AUTHOR

II. THE SCARLET LETTER
THE CUSTOM-HOUSE. Introductory

I. THE PRISON-Door
II. THE MARKET-PLACE
III. THE RECOGNITION
IV. THE INTERVIEW
V. HESTER AT HER NEEDLE .
VI. PEARL
VII. THE GOVERNOR'S HALL
VIII. THE ELF-CHILD AND THE MINISTER
IX. THE LEECH
X. THE LEECH AND HIS PATIENT
XI. THE INTERIOR OF A HEART
XII. THE MINISTER'S VIGIL
XIII. ANOTHER VIEW OF HESTER
XIV. HESTER AND THE PHYSICIAN
XV. HESTER AND PEARL .
XVI. A FOREST WALK
XVII. THE PASTOR AND HIS PARISHIONER
XVIII. A FLOOD OF SUNSHINE
XIX. THE CHILD AT THE BROOK-SIDE
XX. THE MINISTER IN A MAZE
XXI. THE NEW ENGLAND HOLIDAY .
XXII. THE PROCESSION
XXIII. THE EVELATION OF THE SC LET LETTER .
XXIV. CONCLUSION

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INTRODUCTION

I. HAWTHORNE: THE MAN AND THE

AUTHOR 1

BY THOMAS WENTWORTH HIGGINSON HAWTHORNE was a man of striking presence, and his physical strength and stateliness irresistibly connected themselves in the minds of those who saw him with the self-contained purpose, the large resources, the waiting power, of the great writer. I first met him on a summer morning in Concord, as he was walking along the road near the Old Manse, with his wife by his side, and a noble-looking baby boy in a little wagon which the father was pushing. I remember him as tall, firm, and strong in bearing; his wife looked pensive and dreamy, as she indeed was, then and always. When I passed, Hawthorne lifted upon me his great gray eyes, with a look too keen to seem indifferent, too shy to be sympathetic — and that was all. But it comes back to memory like that one glimpse of Shelley which Browning describes, and which he likens to the day when he found an eagle's feather.

It is surprising to be asked whether Hawthorne was not physically very small. It seems at the moment utterly inconceivable that he could have been anything less than the sombre and commanding personage he was. Ellery Channing well describes him as a

1 From A Reader's History of American Literature. By Thomas Wentworth Higginson and Henry Walcott Boynton. Copyright, 1903.

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