Immigration and Labor: The Economic Aspects of European Immigration to the United States

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B.W. Huebsch, 1922 - 574 lappuses
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PART II
40
CHAPTER II
48
Americans of native stock coming back to the mills since
50
Difference in wages due to grade of service not to country
52
LABOR ORGANIZATIONS
53
CHAPTER III
61
1861
67
Visits abroad made by foreignborn employees in iron
75
CHAPTER IV
82
Movement of thirdclass passengers between the United
89
Assisted immigration
96
CHAPTER V
103
Average annual earnings of farm laborers in Kansas com
111
Range of fluctuations of employment 1899 and 1904
122
Unemployment is in inverse ratio to the relative number
131
Laborers male foreignborn and unemployed 1900
136
CHAPTER VII
148
Average number of wageearners employed in manufactures
151
Increase of the number of miners in the United States clas
157
Scholastic theory of wages
158
Number of English Welsh Irish and German male bread
166
Tales of induced immigration unconfirmed
170
Increase and decrease of the number of breadwinners
174
Foreignborn population of Germany net emigration
180
Average annual earnings in Prussian coal mines 18901910
186
Annual average immigration from Germany 18751910
192
Immigration of German unskilled laborers to the United
194
Increase of foreign born from the Scandinavian countries
198
Total number of Norwegian immigrants highest in 19011910
202
Average annual emigration from cities and rural districts
206
G The United Kingdom
209
Number of emigrants from the United Kingdom by destina
212
H Ireland
215
Defects of wage statistics
216
Families occupying each class of inhabited houses in rural
219
CHAPTER IX
221
Per cent ratio of native white children under five years
224
Relative and absolute decrease of the rural population
226
CHAPTER X
228
Industrial causes of congestion
235
Migratory character of the population of the United States
240
Per cent distribution of the families of Boston according
242
Southern mill towns
246
Per cent of families keeping boarders or lodgers among
252
Average expenditure per man per day of selected families
258
Prices paid by recent immigrants the same as those paid
261
Expenditure for clothing in normal families of unskilled
267
TABLE PAGE
268
CHAPTER XI
274
Percentage of native white homeowners to all occupants
278
Regulation of terms of employment by conferences between organ
279
Adjustment of native and foreign elements on the scale
284
Low wages
286
Average annual deficit per working family in Ohio by occu
297
Wages in coal mines and steel mills
302
CHAPTER XIII
311
Number and date of organization of active labor unions
334
Tradeunionism stronger in New York than in Kansas with
335
Per cent ratio of tradeunion membership to urban popula
339
Trade unions stronger in New York City than in the remainder
341
Housing conditions of New England working girls in the 40s 241
344
150
345
Possibilities of organization among the unskilled
349
Per cent distribution by nativity of lodgers at municipal
355
480
356
Crime
358
Competition of farmhouse labor in the middle of the nineteenth
365
Comparative growth of the value of the products of the cloth
369
American garment workers in the country accepting a lower rate
371
No competition between union labor and unorganized immigrants
377
Percentage of immigrants from Southern and Eastern Europe
379
CHAPTER XIX
384
Number of native Americans of native parentage employed
387
CHAPTER XX
394
Classification of employees in selected rolling mills of Ohio
396
Retention of skilled men conditioned upon the employment of
401
Employees of Carnegie Steel Company plants in Allegheny
402
Wages in the iron and steel industry vary directly as the ratio
408
THE COAL MINERS
414
CHAPTER VI
435
151
437
The racial displacement theory of the Immigration Com
438
History of the miners unions in the bituminous coal fields
447
CHAPTER VIII
458
Opening of new mining fields the real cause of the westward move
471
Misleading comparisons between Englishspeaking and non
473
Number and per cent distribution of fatal accidents in coal
474
Irregularity of employment a bar to home ownership
486
UNEMPLOYMENT
487
Emigration from Northern and Western
492
1910
495
Wheat produced exported and retained for consumption
504
Index numbers of the yearly production and prices of veg
507
In answer to critics
515
A The Causes of Unemployment
518
PAGE
524
Note Importation of Mexican contractlaborers
530
Annual average immigration distributed by occupa
531
Percentage ratios of unemployed and of foreign white
537
Decline of immigration
541
Number and increase or decrease of foreignborn white
544
B Germany
546
Average wages and average expenses of working families
551
Number of fatal accidents and ratio per 1000
557
277
561
416
562
471
564
Congestion in the settlements of past generations of immi
565
Salutary effects predicted by the Commission on Industrial
566
among the
570
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74. lappuse - English; they import many Books from Germany; and of the six printing houses in the Province, two are entirely German, two half German half English, and but two entirely English; They have one German News-paper, and one half German.
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