Darwin and Hegel: With Other Philosophical Studies

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S. Sonnenschein & Company, 1893 - 285 lappuses

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Populāri fragmenti

276. lappuse - Give me the liberty to know, to utter, and to argue freely according to conscience, above all liberties.
179. lappuse - Though the earth and all inferior creatures be common to all men, yet every man has a property in his own person ; this nobody has any right to but himself. The labour of his body, and the work of his hands, we may say, are properly his.
188. lappuse - The state of Nature has a law of Nature to govern it, which obliges every one, and reason, which is that law, teaches all mankind who will but consult it, that being all equal and independent, no one ought to harm another in his life, health, liberty or possessions...
178. lappuse - The great and chief end, therefore, of men's uniting into commonwealths and putting themselves under government is the preservation of their property.
225. lappuse - As the ends of such a partnership cannot be obtained in many generations, it becomes a partnership not only between those who are living but between those who are living, those who are dead, and those who are to be born.
225. lappuse - Society is indeed a contract. Subordinate contracts for objects of mere occasional interest may be dissolved at pleasure ; but the state ought not to be considered as nothing better than a partnership agreement in a trade of pepper and coffee, calico or tobacco, or some other such low concern, to be taken up for a little temporary interest, and to be dissolved by the fancy of the parties.
257. lappuse - England — of that great compound of folly, weakness, prejudice, wrong feeling, right feeling, obstinacy, and newspaper paragraphs, which is called public opinion...
251. lappuse - When we inquire by what means this wonder is effected, we shall find, that, as Force is always on the side of the governed, the governors have nothing to support them but opinion. It is, therefore, on opinion only that government is founded; and this maxim extends to the most despotic and most military governments, as well as to the most free and most popular.
179. lappuse - Thus the grass my horse has bit; the turfs my servant has cut; and the ore I have digged in any place, where I have a right to them in common with others, become my property, without the assignation or consent of any body. The labour that was mine, removing them out of that common state they were in, hath fixed my property in them.
238. lappuse - THOUGH in a constituted commonwealth, standing upon its own basis, and acting according to its own nature, that is, acting for the preservation of the community, there can be but one supreme power, which is the legislative, to which all the rest are and must be subordinate...

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