Beaumont and Fletcher: Or, The Finest Scenes, Lyrics, and Other Beauties of Those Two Poets, Now First Selected from the Whole of Their Works, Tothe Exclusion of Whatever is Morally Objectionable; Etc. with Opinions of Distinguished Critics, Notes, Explanatory and Otherwise, and a General Introductory Preface

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H. G. Bohn, 1862 - 363 lappuses
 

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259. lappuse - Dr. Richardson's Philological Dictionary of the ENGLISH LANGUAGE. Combining Explanation with Etymology, and copiously illustrated by Quotations from the Best Authorities. New Edition, with a Supplement containing additional Words and further Illustrations. In 2 vols.
39. lappuse - So high in thoughts as I : You left a kiss Upon these lips then, which I mean to keep From you for ever. I did hear you talk Far above singing ! After you were gone, I grew acquainted with my heart, and search'd What stirr'd it so : Alas ! I found it love ; Yet far from lust ; for could I but have lived In presence of you, I had had my end.
249. lappuse - Welcome, folded arms and fixed eyes, A sigh that piercing mortifies, A look that's fastened to the ground, A tongue chained up without a sound ! Fountain heads and pathless groves, Places which pale passion loves ! Moonlight walks, when all the fowls Are warmly housed save bats and owls ! A midnight bell, a parting groan, These are the sounds we feed upon ; Then stretch our bones in a still gloomy valley : Nothing's so dainty sweet as lovely melancholy.
254. lappuse - Man is his own star; and the soul that can Render an honest and a perfect man, Commands all light, all influence, all fate; Nothing to him falls early or too late. Our acts our angels are, or good or ill, Our fatal shadows that walk by us still.
48. lappuse - Lay a garland on my hearse, Of the dismal yew; Maidens, willow branches bear; Say I died true: My love was false, but I was firm From my hour of birth. Upon my buried body lie Lightly, gentle earth!
195. lappuse - I sit by and sing, Or gather rushes to make many a ring For thy long fingers...
158. lappuse - Care-charming Sleep, thou easer of all woes, Brother to Death, sweetly thyself dispose On this afflicted prince. Fall like a cloud In gentle showers: give nothing that is loud Or painful to his slumbers : easy, sweet, And as a purling stream, thou son of Night, Pass by his troubled senses ; sing his pain Like hollow murmuring wind, or silver rain : Into this prince, gently, oh gently slide, And kiss him into slumbers, like a bride.
15. lappuse - Sir, if I have made A fault of ignorance, instruct my youth; I shall be willing, if not apt, to learn : Age and experience will adorn my mind With larger knowledge ; and if I have done A wilful fault, think me not past all hope For once. What master holds so strict a hand Over his boy, that he will part with him Without one warning ? Let me be corrected, To break my stubbornness, if it be so, Rather than turn me off, and I shall mend.
258. lappuse - The vocabulary has become almost complete, as regards usual words, while the definitions keep throughout to Webster's simple careful style, and the derivations are assigned with the aid of good modern authorities.
258. lappuse - The acceptance of an American Dictionary in England has itself had immense effect in keeping up the community of speech, to break which would be a grievous harm, not to English-speaking nations alone, but to mankind. The result of this has been that the common Dictionary must suit both sides of the Atlantic.

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