The Handbook of Group Communication Theory and Research

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The Handbook of Group Communication Theory and Research establishes a central resource for the field, documenting and synthesizing the work done in group communication's 50-year history. With contributions from the most experienced and respected scholars in the field, the editors present an overview of group communication study and examine a variety of theoretical positions and methodological practices.

The volume is divided into six broad areas of communication scholarship: foundations of group communication theory and research; individuals and group communication; task and relational group communication; group communication processes; group communication facilitation; and group communication contexts and applications. The sections serve as a crossroads where various paths pursued in each area meet and summarize and suggest new maps and roads that need to be followed in the future.

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Saturs

The Emergence and Evolution
3
Group Communication Theory
37
The Systems Metaphor in Group Communication
71
Issues and Considerations
92
What Differences Do Individual Differences in Groups Make?
115
TaskGroup Communication and DecisionMaking Performance
167
Relational Communication in Groups
192
Collective Information Processing in Groups
225
Group Communication and Creativity Processes
335
The Impact of Formal Procedures on Group Processes Members
395
Communication Technology and Group Communication
432
Studying the First Group
475
Group Communication in the Formal Educational Context
493
Communication in Social Support Groups
516
Author Index
565
Subject Index
573

Nonverbal Aspects of Group Communication
251
Influence Processes in Group Interaction
288
About the Editor
585
Autortiesības

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Par autoru (1999)

Lawrence (Larry) R. Frey is a Professor in the Department of Communication at the University of Colorado at Boulder. His teaching and research interests include group interaction, applied communication (communication activism, communication and social justice, communication and community studies, and health communication), and communication research methods (both quantitative and qualitative). His research seeks to understand how participation (especially by those who are underresourced and marginalized) in collective communicative practices makes a difference in people’s individual, relational, and collective lives. He received a B.S. from Northwestern University and an M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Kansas. Prior to coming to the University of Colorado at Boulder, he served as department chair at The University of Memphis and as a faculty member at Loyola University Chicago and at Wayne State University. He is the author/editor of 14 books, 3 special journal issues, and more than 60 published book chapters and journal articles. He is the recipient of 11 distinguished scholarship awards, including the 2000 Gerald M. Phillips Award for Distinguished Applied Communication Scholarship from the National Communication Association (NCA); the 2004, 2003, and 2000 Ernest Bormann Research Award from NCA’s Group Communication Division, for, respectively, the edited texts, Group Communication in Context: Studies of Bona Fide Groups (2nd ed.), New Directions in Group Communication, and The Handbook of Group Communication Theory and Research (coedited with Dennis S. Gouran and Marshall Scott Poole); a 1999 Special Recognition Award from NCA’s Applied Communication Division for an edited special issue of the Journal of Applied Communication Research on “Communication and Social Justice Research”; the 1998 National Jesuit Book Award (Professional Studies Category) and the 1988 Distinguished Book Award from NCA’s Applied Communication Division for his coauthored text (with Mara B. Adelman), The Fragile Community: Living Together With AIDS; and the 1995 Gerald R. Miller Award from NCA’s Interpersonal and Small Group Interaction Division and the 1994 Distinguished Book Award from NCA’s Applied Communication Division for his edited text, Group Communication in Context: Studies of Natural Groups. He is a past president of the Central States Communication Association and a recipient of the Outstanding Young Teacher Award from that organization, as well as a 2003 Master Teacher Award from the Communication and Instruction Interest Group of the Western States Communication Association.

M. Scott Poole (Ph.D., University of Wisconsin—Madison [communication arts]; M.A., Michigan State University [communication]; B.A., University of Wisconsin—Madison [communication arts]) is one of the nation’s top scholars in group communication and in organizational communication. Among his publications is one of the leading college textbooks on organizational communication (Strategic Organizational Communication, 5/e, Wadsworth); he is also co-editor of SAGE’s Handbook of Group Communication. He has been chair of the Organizational Communication Division of NCA and was the chair and founding member of NCA’s Group Communication Division. He is, or has been, a member of the following editorial journal boards: Human Communication Research, Communication Monographs, Communication Research, Communication Quarterly, Journal of Applied Communication Research, Academy of Management Review, Communication Theory, Quarterly Journal of Speech, Information Systems Research, Organization Science, Journal of Electronically-Mediated Communication, Journal of Organizational Discourse, Information and Organization.

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