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PROGRESS

BY

W. DUNCAN MCKIM, M.D., Ph.D.

“'T is an unweeded garden
That grows to seed ; things rank, and gross in nature,
Possess it merely.”

Hamlet.

Each man in whom dissatisfaction is aroused by institutions which
have survived from a less civilized past, or whose npathie make
certain evils repugnant to him, must regard his feelings thus excited as
units in the aggregate of forces by which progress is to be brought about ;
and is called on to expend his feelings in appropriate deeds."

HERBERT SPENCER,

G. P. PUTNAM'S SONS
NEW YORK AND LONDON
Tbe knickerbocker Press

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PREFACE

ROFOUNDLY convinced of the inefficiency of

the measures which we bring to bear against the weakness and depravity of our race, I venture to plead for the remedy which alone, as I believe, can hold back the advancing tide of disintegration.

With the flood of light recently thrown upon the nature of man by the researches of mental pathology and criminology, and with the independence of judgment induced by the methods of modern science, it is a marvel that we halt in indecision before that

— ever-strengthening torrent of defective and criñinar humanity.

Religion, philanthropy, and the law have in this shown themselves powerless. If civilization cannot devise more efficient means of self-protection, its progress will continue to be leaden-footed or even, as we may fear, be gradually transformed into retrograde motion. History shows by many examples how, through inadequate self-regulation, mighty nations wane and vanish.

The remedy here proposed is in part a very old idea, but so modified and expanded as to differ profoundly from its prototype. Some recent writers have hinted that, in the near future, this old idea

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