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PUBLICATION AND SALE OF HISTORICAL AND EDUCA

TIONAL MATERIAL

May 27, 1937.-Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the state of

the Union and ordered to be printed

Mr. KELLER, from the Committee on the Library, submitted the

following

REPORT

[To accompany H. J. Res. 380)

The Committee on the Library, to whom was referred the joint resolution (H. J. Res. 380) to provide for the publication and sale by the Northwest Territory Celebration Commission of certain historical and educational material, report the bill favorably to the House of Representatives and recommend that it do pass.

On August 2, 1935, House Joint Resolution 208 was enacted into law. This resolution establishes a commission of 14, and there was subsequently appropriated $100,000 to celebrate the one hundred and fiftieth anniversary of the adoption of the Ordinance of 1787 and the settlement of the Northwest Territory.

The Commission offered a prize for the best school textbook dealing with the ordinance and events following its passage by the Congress in 1787.

Arrangements have been made where the Works Progress Administration will print and bind this textbook for use in all schools in Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin, and Minnesota, as well as any other sections desiring it. The only cost to the Commission will be the purchase of paper used in the printing of the books. This will make it possible for the Commission to sell a standard size textbook for 10 cents per copy. The Commission will use approximately $5,000 for this purpose. This will print 50,000 textbooks. It is the hope of the Commission to sell these 50,000 textbooks and then print 50,000 more, and to continue this process indefinitely until such books shall be in the hands of several million children for study next fall.

For this reason the Commission desires the passage of House Joint Resolution 380. If this resolution is not passed, the original 50,000 will be sold and the $5,000 must be placed in the general fund of the Treasury. The Commission being without further funds for this purpose, could distribute no more books.

In view of the worthy objective and the fact that it will not cost the Treasury an additional cent, the Committee on the Library reports favorably House Joint Resolution 380, and recommends its passage.

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ERECTION OF TERMINAL MARKER FOR JEFFERSON

DAVIS NATIONAL HIGHWAY

May 27, 1937.—Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the state

of the Union and ordered to be printed

Mr. KELLER, from the Committee on the Library, submitted the

following

REPORT

[To accompany S. 1468]

The Committee on the Library, to whom was referred the bill (S. 1468) authorizing the erection in the District of Columbia of a suitable terminal marker for the Jefferson Davis National Highway, after study and consideration, report the bill favorably to the House of Representatives and recommend that it do pass.

Evidence submitted in favor of granting such permission disclosed that Jefferson Davis took part in the Indian warfare on the northwestern frontier. Chief Black Hawk was sent to St. Louis in custody of Lieutenant Davis. He distinguished himself in the War with Mexico, especially at the Battle of Buena Vista, where he made use of the echelon or wedge-shaped formation of his troops. He was Secretary of War in the cabinet of Franklin Pierce. Jefferson Davis built the aqueduct which still assures an abundnat supply of water to the city of Washington. The Cabin John Bridge is a part of this project. He added four regiments to the Army and raised the standards of living conditions for officers and men. He sought the most practical means of communication with the West for he foresaw its coming greatness. He had a survey made for a transcontinental highway to protect the early settlers, in order to rush them supplies and military help. He chose a southern route because it would be open to traffic all of the year. It is proper to begin this highway in Washington, the scene of so much of Jefferson Davis' labor, and to end it in San Francisco, the terminus of his proposed road.

The provisions of the bill are such that a marker in harmony with its surroundings, and in accordance with the plans and desires of the Fine Arts Commission will result, and there is no cost to the Government.

O
H. Repts., 75–1, vol. 2—88

75TH CONGRESS | HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES 1st Session

EXTENSION OF BOUNDARIES OF PAPAGO INDIAN

RESERVATION IN ARIZONA

Mar 27, 1937.-Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the state

of the Union and ordered to be printed

Mr. MURDOCK of Arizona, from the Committee on Indian Affairs,

submitted the following

REPORT

(To accompany S. 1806]

The Committee on Indian Affairs, to whom was referred the bill (S. 1806) to extend the boundaries of the Papago Indian Reservation in Arizona, having considered the same, report thereon with a recommendation that it do pass without amendment.

The board of supervisors of Pima County, in which the lands described in S. 1806 are situated, favors this legislation. A resolution from the board follows:

RESOLUTION OF BOARD OF SUPERVISORS, Pima County, ARIZ. Whereas Father Bonaventure Oblasser, a member of the committee appointed to delimit the boundary of the Papago Reservation as defined by the Executive order dated February 1, 1917, has represented to us that two tracts of land then occupied by Papago Indians were inadvertently omitted from the inclusion order; and

Whereas Father Bonaventure Oblasser represents that it was the intention to include all Papago Indians situate on lands contiguous to the main body of the Papago within the Papago Reservation; and

Whereas it has been made to appear that the public lands now requested for inclusion in the Papago Reservation have been used by the Papago Indians since time immemorial, with the exception of the homestead entry of Joseph Menager: Now, therefore, be it

Resolved by the Pima County Board of Supervisors, That we hereby go on record as favoring extension of the Papago Reservation to include all of the unappropriated public domain in T. 17 S., R. 3 W., T. 18 S., Rs. 2 and 3 W., and T. 19 S., Rs. 2 and 3 W., which lands are situate at the southwest corner of the Papago Reservation; and the W72 sec. 4 and the W3 sec. 9 in T. 17 S., R. 8 E., which tract is now occupied by Pablo Lejiro, a Papago Indian, which is located on the east side of the Papago Reservation, and all lands described herein being in Pima County, Ariz.

Pima COUNTY BOARD OF SUPERVISORS,

By W. A. GROSSETTA, Chairman. Attest:

GLADSTONE MACKENZIE, Clerk,

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