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18t Session

No. 773

OLIVER WENDELL HOLMES MEMORIAL FUND

May 5, 1937.-Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the state of

the Union and ordered to be printed

Mr. KELLER, from the Committee on the Library, submitted the

following

REPORT

(To accompany H. J. Res. 19)

The Committee on the Library, having had under consideration the joint resolution (H. J. Res. 19) for the establishment of a trust fund to be known as the Oliver Wendell Holmes Memorial Fund, report the same favorably to the House with the recommendation that it do pass as amended:

Line 12, page 2, strike out the words "Law Division" and insert in lieu thereof the words "law departinent.”

The resolution provides that the funds bequeathed the United States by the late Mr. Justice Holmes, when received, be transferred to the Library of Congress Trust Fund Board and be set aside and designated as the "Oliver Wendell Holmes Memorial Fund” for the purpose of building up and maintaining a collection of works on jurisprudence.

The committee is of the opinion that no more appropriate or beneficial use could be found for this lund than to establish a collection of material which will be of service to students seeking to understand the fundamental laws which govern governments in their origin, development, and operation. This would be a peculiarly appropriate use for this particular fund for the reasor that during his lifetime the late Justice Holmes' chief interest and contribution related to the fundamentals of government, the philosophy of law, and the principles of jurisprudence. At the present time the outstanding students of our own and the world's problems agree that such studies are indispensable for the proper solution of the complex social and economic problems of today.

O

SPECIAL STATISTICAL STUDIES BY DEPARTMENT OF

LABOR

May 5, 1937.—Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the state of

the Union and ordered to be printed

JL. CONNERY, from the Committee on Labor, submitted the following

REPORT

[To accompany S. 1967)

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The Committee on Labor, to whom was referred the bill (S. 1967) to authorize the Department of Labor to continue to make special statistical studies upon payment of the cost thereof, and for other purposes, having considered the same, report favorably thereon and recommend that the bill be passed.

In brief, the purpose of the bill is to continue the authorization of the Department of Labor to make special statistical studies, prepare records and furnish transcripts of such studies when requested, and when payment for the actual cost thereof is made--all of which is provided for in a measure which was favorably reported by this committee, passed by the Senate and by the House, and approved by the President, April 11, 1935 (Public, No. 34, 74th Cong., ch. 59,

, 49 Stat. 154). The present bill (S. 1967) continues the authority thereon conferred, until April 13, 1939.

The Secretary of Labor recommends the passage of the bill in a letter to the Senate Committee on Education and Labor as follows:

DEPARTMENT OF LABOR,

Washington, April 5, 1937. Hon. Hugo L. BLACK, Chairman, Committee on Education and Labor,

United States Senate, Washington, D. C. DEAR SENATOR BLack: I have your letter of March 30 asking for my comment 02 S. 1967, a bill to authorize the Department of Labor to continue to make special statistical studies upon payment of the cost thereof, and for other purposes. The

purpose of the proposed bill is to extend the act of April 13, 1934 (73d Cong., th. 118, 48 Stat. 582), which authorized the Department of Labor to make special statistical studies upon the payment of the costs thereof. The duration of this act was limited to 1 year, but was extended to April 13, 1937, by the act of April 11, 1935 (74th Cong., ch.59, 49 Stat. 154).

H. Repts., 75–1, vol. 2-14

The experience of the Department of Labor under this act I believe justifies the continuation of the services authorized under it. Since 1934 the Department of Labor has furnished impartial statistical information falling within the general scope of the Department's activities but for which funds would not have been available.

It should be noted that the proposed bill does not require an additional appropriation, since the full costs of the studies made thereunder are met by the persons requesting such studies. Since 1934 the Department has received approximately $9,000 from such representative organizations as the joint board, Dress and Waist Makers' Union, the Automobile Manufacturing Association, the National Association of Wool Manufacturers, Ohio State University, and the New York State Department of Labor, for making studies authorized under this act.

I feel that the Department of Labor has been rendering an extremely desirable service which has not required any additional expense, and I earnestly recommend that authorization to render this service be extended.

This bill was submitted to the Director of the Budget for his advice when it was in draft form'and he informed the Department that this legislation was in harmony with the President's program if the duration of the bill was limited to 3 years. You will notice that this is the case, for the bill by its terms expires on April 13, 1940. Inasmuch as the present act will expire on April 11, I should appreciate any action your committee might take which would expedite passage of this proposal. Sincerely yours,

FRANCES PERKINS. O

AMENDING HEALING ARTS PRACTICE ACT

May 10, 1937.-Referred to the House Calendar and ordered to be printed

Mrs. Norton, from the Committee on the District of Columbia, sub

mitted the following

REPORT

[To accompany H. R. 6696]

The Committee on the District of Columbia, to whom was referred the bill (H. R. 6696) to amend an act entitled "An act to regulate the practice of the healing art to protect the public health in the District of Columbia”, known as the "Healing Arts Practice Act, District of Columbia, 1928", approved February 27, 1929, having considered the same, report favorably thereon and recommend that the bill do pass.

Section 24 of the above-mentioned act, after making provision for the relicensing of persons previously licensed to practice medicine and surgery, or to practice midwifery, provides thatapplication for such relicensing shall be made within ninety days after the publication of such notice and further provides that:

After five years after the approval of this Act the Commission shall issue no license to practice the healing art in the District of Columbia on the basis of a license to practice medicine and surgery, or to practice midwifery, in the District ci Columbia, in force on the date of its approval.

Since the expiration of the 5-year period the only way open to a former practitioner here to resume his practice in the District of Columbia was through a special act of Congress, and bills have been presented in the interests of physicians who have gone to foreign countries as medical missionaries, who have served in the Medical Corps of the United States Army, or who have established practice in other cities, therefore were, owing to absence from the District, uninformed as to the time limit established by the Healing Arts Practice Act of 1928 for the submitting of applications for relicensing.

The purpose of the bill is to eliminate the 5-year restriction in the Healing Arts Practice Act, thereby obviating tắe necessity for CongTess to in effect grant physicians' licenses by leaving the Commission

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