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MONTANA.

In MONTANA, the property of a married woman, whether acquired before or after marriage, and her earnings and accumulations are her separate property, and are not liable for debts of the husband except for necessaries for herself and children under eighteen years of age. A list of such property may be recorded with the county clerk and is prima facie evidence of her, title. She may prosecute and defend suits, and may convey her separate property without consent of husband. Husband must support wife and family if able; if not, she must assist to the extent of her ability. Neither husband ncr wife has any interest in the property of the other, and neither is answerable for the acts of the other. Either may enter into any transaction with the other or with any other person respecting property, as though unmarried. Widow has dower in one-third of all lands of which husband was seized during coverture. If he leave no issue she may elect in lieu of dower one-half of his real estate in fee, subject to payment of debts. Curtesy is abolished. A married woman may make a will, but cannot without husband's consent deprive him of more than two-thirds of her property, real and personal.

NEBRASKA. In NebRASKA, all the property, real or personal, of a married woman coming to her either before or after marriage, except by gift from her husband, and all the rents and profits thereof, are her sole and separate property, and may be managed by her alone, with interference by her husband, and they are not liable for his debts. She may convey or make any contract in reference to it that a married man may make as to his property; may sue and be sued, and carry on any business; and her. earnings are her own. She may make a will; is not liable for her husband's debts; property of the husband is not liable for her debts. She must join with husband in conveyance or encumbrance of homestead. Women attain their majority at sixteen if married, otherwise at eighteen. Dower and curtesy are abolished.

NEVADA.

In NEVADA, all property of the wife, real or personal, held at marriage, or afterwards acquired by gift, bequest, devise, or descent, is her separate property; and all the husband's so held or acquired is his separate property. All property acquired otherwise by either party, after marriage, is common property. She may manage and dispose of her separate property without his consent. During the marriage the husband has the exclusive control and management of the common property, and may sell and dispose of the same as his own, but any conveyance or mortgage of homestead must be executed by both husband and wife. At the death of either husband or wife all of the common property goes to the survivor. Dower and curtesy are abolished. If husband is unable to support himself and has no separate or common property wife must support him from her separate estate. The separate property of the wife is liable for her antenuptial debts, but his is not. Marriage contracts, duly executed and recorded, may vary these rights and interests. Married women may carry on and transact business under their own name, under certain regulations. Her earnings are not liable for her husband's debts; they may contract together; she may sue and be sued alone if living separate. Women become of age at eighteen.

NEW HAMPSHIRE.

In New HAMPSHIRE, a married woman may hold real or personal estate, and convey, sell, devise, and bequeath the same as freely as if sole. She is entitled to the absolute control of her own earnings, and is not liable for the debts of the husband. She may make contracts in her own name, buy goods, give notes, and transact any business whatever, as if sole, and bind her own property, in the course of such business, for her own benefit, and without the intervention of the husband; but she is not liable as surety for her husband, or in any undertaking in his behalf. He is not liable for her debts contracted before marriage. In case of desertion, or when the husband is a spendthrift, insane, or under guardianship, the wife has all the rights of a feme sole. A married woman may make a will. Either may convey real estate directly to the other. Dower and curtesy as at common law.

NEW JERSEY.

Property owned by a woman at the time of her marriage, or afterwards acquired by gift, grant, descent, devise, or bequest, and the income therefrom, is her separate property, not subject to the disposal of her husband, or liable for his debts. She may bind herself by contract in the same manner as though unmarried, and may sue and be sued on such contracts without her husband, but she cannot be an accommodation endorser or a surety, nor is she liable, on any promise, to answer for the debt or default of any other person. She cannot convey or encumber real estate without her husband; but a married woman having power to convey as executrix, administratrix, trustee, or guardian, may make a valid deed without husband's signature. If she is living in state of separation under a decree or without a decree, if there is no issue, she may convey certain interests in certain lands. Her separate property is not liable for debts contracted for the support of herself or family as her husband's agent, nor is she liable for family expenses, except by express contract in her own name. When a man refuses or neglects to support his wife, and she lives separate from him, she may, by order of court, sell, mortgage, or lease her lands, and may sue her husband in all matters relating to her separate property, as though unmarried. A married woman may make a will, but cannot defeat her husband's rights in her real estate. Dower as at common law. Majority at twenty-one.

NEW MEXICO.

All property owned by either husband or wife before marriage, or afterwards acquired by gift, bequest, devise, or descent, is his or her separate property and is not liable for the debts of the other contracted before marriage. Her separate property is not liable for his debts after marriage, but is liable for her own. She may convey it without his consent. All other property acquired by either after marriage is community property. This is not liable for her contracts unless secured by mortgage or pledge executed by him. Husband has the management and control of community property with full power of disposition other than testamentary, except that he cannot make a gift of it, or sell or encumber the homestead or household furniture, or clothing of wife or children without her written consent. On the death of wife the whole community property belongs to husband. On the death of husband one half goes to wife; the other half is subject to his testamentary disposition, and if he make none goes, one fourth to the surviving wife, and one fourth to children if any, if none all to her. Husband and wife may contract with each other and with others as if unmarried. There is no dower or curtesy.

NEW YORK.

The real and personal property of any woman acquired before or after marriage remains her separate property, not liable for her husband's debts. Marriage contracts are allowed. She may carry on a trade or business on her separate account, may manage her property and business free from the control of her husband, and may dispose of her real or personal estate. Her bargains do not bind her husband. She may sue and be sued in regard to her person or separate property. By act of 1906 she may bring suit on torts without joining her husband. Transfers of real estate may be made directly between husband and wife and they may contract with one another. Her husband is liable for her antenuptial debts to the extent of the assets received from her. A policy of insurance on the life of any one in her favor may with consent of the insured be assigned. She may hold patents for her inventions, and may vote on stock held by her. She may be a guardian, executrix, or administratrix, and may give the necessary bonds. She may make a will of personal property at sixteen; of real property at twenty-one. She may make a power of attorney as if single. Age of consent to marriage is eighteen.

NORTH CAROLINA.

All the property, real and personal, of a married woman, whether acquired before or after marriage, is her separate property, and is not liable for the debts or obligations of her husband. Marriage settlements are invalid as against creditors existing at the time of the making the same. Her husband is not liable for her debts, contracts, or wrongs, made or committed before marriage. She cannot make contracts without her husband's written consent, except for necessary personal expenses, or for the support of the family, or in payment of antenuptial debts, unless she is a free-trader. A wife abandoned by her husband may contract and bind her separate estate. The savings from the income of the separate property of the wife belong to her. She may make a will, provided she do not deprive her husband of his curtesy, and may convey her property with his written consent. She may insure his life for her benefit, if the premium do not exceed three hundred dollars. Females are of age at twenty-one.

NORTH DAKOTA.

A married woman may own in her own right real and personal property, and manage, sell, convey, and devise the same as freely as though unmarried. She may make contracts and sue and be sued thereon. Neither husband nor wife has any interest in the property of the other, or is answerable for the other's acts. Husband and wife may make contracts with each other respecting property as though unmarried. The earnings or separate property of the wife are not liable for the debts of the husband. Women attain their majority at eighteen. Curtesy and dower are abolished.

OHIO.

All property, real or personal, belonging to a woman at her marriage, or afterwards acquired by conveyance, gift, devise, or inheritance, or by purchase with her separate money or means, or due as wages of her personal labor, or growing out of any violation of her personal rights, together with the income therefrom, is her separate property, is under her sole control, and not liable for any debts of her husband. She may sue and be sued in her own name, and may contract in the same manner and to the same extent as though unmarried. Husband and wife may contract with each other. A

married woman whose husband deserts her, or neglects to provide for his family, may, in her own name, contract for the labor of herself and her minor children, and collect the earnings thereof, and may, by application to the court of common pleas, secure the care and control of minor children and the disposition of her real property. A married woman may make a will. Women attain their majority at the age of eighteen. The husband is not liable for the wife's contracts or torts. Curtesy is abolished, but the husband has a dower right in the wife's estate.

OKLAHOMA.

A married woman may own, manage, sell, convey, and devise property, real and personal, acquired by gift, descent, or purchase, and make contracts and incur liabilities, in the same manner as if unmarried. Neither husband or wife has any interest in the property of the other, but neither can be excluded from the other's dwelling. Husband and wife may contract with each other, or with others, respecting property, subject as between themselves to the rules of law as to persons in confidential relations. Neither is answerable for the acts of the other. Earnings of wife and of minor children living with her while she is living separate from her husband are her separate property. The separate property of wife is not liable for debts of husband, but is liable for her own debts contracted before or after marriage, except for those contracted for the support of herself, her children, or family as her husband's agent. She may buy and sell goods, give notes or other obligations, and sue and be sued, as if unmarried. Women attain their majority at eighteen. Dower and curtesy are abolished.

OREGON.

The property of a married woman, whether acquired before marriage or after, is her separate property, and is not liable for the debts of the husband. She may manage, sell, convey, or devise the same by will, to the same extent and in the same manner that her husband can property belonging to him. Husband and wife may convey property to one another. Property of both is liable for expenses of family and education of children. Neither is liable for the contracts of the other. By special statute all civil disabilities which are not imposed upon the husband are removed from the wife, except the right to vote and hold office. Women attain their majority at eighteen, or on marriage. Widow is entitled as dower to use for life of one half of lands owned by husband at any time during marriage.

PENNSYLVANIA.

The disabilities of married women as to acquisition, control, and disposition of property, and the right to make contracts have been substantially removed. Every married woman has the right to acquire, hold, control, and dispose of her property, real and personal, in the same manner as though unmarried, except that she cannot mortgage, lease, or convey real estate unless her husband joins in the conveyance. Her deed or lease must be separately acknowledged.

Property of every kind owned, acquired, or earned by her before or after marriage belongs to her and not to her husband or his creditors. She may make any contract relating to any business in which she may engage, or for necessaries, or in relation to her separate estate, and may sue or be sued thereon, or for torts done to or committed by her, in the same manner and with the same effect as though unmarried, and any recovery by or against her will affect only her separate estate, but she cannot become accommodation endorser, guarantor, or surety for another. She may make assignments, trans

fers, aad sales of her separate personal property of every kind without her husband joining. She may dispose of her property, real and personal, by will signed by her as though unmarried. Widow takes for life one-third (or if no issue living, one-half) of all real estate owned by husband at his decrease and dower in all owned by him at any time during marriage, unless she has released it, or the land has been sold under execution. Husband has wife's lands for life whether there be issue or not.

RHODE ISLAND.

The property of a married woman, whether acquired before or after marriage, including that acquired by her own industry, together with the income from the same, is not liable for her husband's debts, and remains her sole and separate property and may be disposed of by her as though she was unmarried, subject, however, to his curtesy in her real estate. She may make contracts of all kinds as though unmarried. She may dispose of her property by will, but not so as to impair her husband's curtesy. Her separate property is not liable for the expenses of the family, or for the support of herself or children except by her written order; property held for her benefit under express trusts may be subject to her contracts by her express written order. Husband and wife may convey property to one another when not in fraud of creditors. A married woman coming from another State whose husband has never lived with her in the State, after a year's 'continuous residence may transact business, make contracts, dispose of property acquired by her, and have the custody of her minor children. A married or unmarried woman is of age at twenty-one.

SOUTH CAROLINA.

By the constitution of South CAROLINA, adopted in 1895, “the real and personal property of a woman held at the time of her marriage, or that which she may thereafter acquire by gift, grant, inheritance, devise, or otherwise, shall be her separate property, and she shall have all the rights incident to the same to which an unmarried man or woman is entitled. She shall have the power to contract and be contracted with in the same manner as if she were unmarried.” She is not bound to support her family if her husband be alive, and her separate property is not bound by the contracts of her husband without her consent. Her earnings and income are a part of her separate estate. Tenancy by the curtesy is abolished.

SOUTH DAKOTA.

A married woman may own in her own right real and personal property, and manage, sell, convey, and devise the same as freely as though unmarried. She may make contracts and sue or be sued thereon. Neither husband nor wife has any interest in the property of the other, or is answerable for the other's acts. Husband and wife may make contracts with each other respecting property as though unmarried. The earnings or separate property of the wife are not liable for the debts of the husband. Women attain their majority at eighteen. Curtesy and dower are abolished.

TENNESSEE.

The husband's interest in his wife's lands cannot be taken by legal process for his debts, nor can he sell it unless she join in the deed. Personal prupo

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