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Claim of C. Porter Kuykendall, Foreign Service officer, class VI.

Mr. Kuykendall had been assigned to Karachi, India; had reached Manila, P. I., when war between Japan and the United States broke out, and was interned in Manila. The Japanese authorities required that all cameras be turned in and Mr. Kuykendall turned in his Eastman Kodak camera. The Manila Hotel Co. gave him a receipt for the camera.

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Claim of Charles H. Whitaker, Foreign Service officer, unclassified.

Mr. Whitaker was assigned to the consulate in Manila, P. I. when war broke out between Japan and the United States. Just before the Japanese entered Manila Mr. Whitaker moved all except his heavy furniture to the Manila Hotel. Previously he had placed his silver, winter clothing, and other valuables with various friends and in the consulate for safekeeping. He attempted to have his, trunk brought to the hotel from the consulate but without success. Later he was able to collect practically all of the personal property and furniture belonging to him and began to pack it for shipment. He expected to sell his car but at the last moment permission to do so was refused. He made a number of attempts to obtain his trunk from the consulate but was unable to find it. When he was exchanged he was forced to leave his car, furniture, and many personal belongings behind. Such things fell into the hands of the Japanese.

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Claim of Ceorge M. Abbott, Foreign Service officer, class VI.

Mr. Abbott was on detail in the consulate at Manila, P. I., at the time of the outbreak of war between Japan and the United States. When the Japanese military authorities took over Manila in January 1942, they ordered all cameras and films to be turned over to them. Mr. Abbott was obliged to turn over his camera and some films to the Japanese authorities, for which he received a receipt from the Manila Hotel Co.

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Claim of Paul P. Steintorf, Foreign Service officer, class II.

Mr. Steintorf was assigned to Manila when war broke out with Japan. The Japanese authorities refused to recognize the Swiss officials as representing American interests in the Philippines and Mr. Steintorf was unable to arrange for the protection of his property. A large portion of Mr. Steintorf's property was confiscated by the Japanese authorities and some was damaged by bombing. On his departure on the exchange vessel only a limited amount of baggage could be taken with him and it was necessary to leave seven boxes of personal and household effects in Manila. The Japanese authorities refused permission to store these possessions with a national of a neutral country and they undoubtedly have been confiscated.

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Claim of Peter K. Constan, vice consul.

Nir. Constan was assigned to the consulate at Zagreb. While on an official trip to Belgrade certain property was stolen.

Later Mr. Constan was assigned as vice consul at Manila, P. I. Upon the occupation of Manila by the Japanese on January 2, 1942, an order was issued to the guests at the Manila Hotel that all photographic apparatus must be turned in to the hotel desk. A receipt for such property was given the owner by the hotel.

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Claim of Frances Whitney, Foreign Service clerk.

Miss Whitney was assigned to Manila, P. I. When the Japanese occupied Manila she was forced to leave her apartment with all her effects in it. She endeavored to have a national of a neutral country take over her things but the disturbed conditions prevented. She also was forced to abandon some of the effects which she had with her while interned because of the baggage limitation on the exchange ship, and it is believed they fell into the hands of the Japanese.

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Claim of Karl L. Rankin, Foreign Service officer, class IV.

Mr. Rankin was assigned to Belgrade, Yugoslavia, when the consulate was closed on July 12, 1941. The arrangements which he had made for leaving Belgrade were, at the last minute, changed by the German authorities and he was compelled to abandon certain personal property in Belgrade.

Mr. Rankin was later transferred to Cairo, reached Manila en route, and was interned there after the arrival of the Japanese. The Japanese confiscated his car, kodak, and films and Colt automatic pistol.

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Claim of J. Holbrook Chapman, Foreign Service officer, class VI.

Mr. Chapman was assigned to the legation at Bangkok, Thailand, when war broke out between Japan and the United States. The Japanese authorities seized his radio, but gave him no receipt. After he was interned he made repeated efforts to obtain his golf clubs but without success.

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Claim of Robert B. Streeper, Foreign Service officer, class VI.

Mr. Streeper was assigned to Penang, Straits Settlements, when hostilities between Japan and the United States began. In September 1941, upon authorization from the Department he shipped to the United States as much of his household and personal effects as could be spared. After war broke out he packed some clothing and other valuables and attempted to ship them to Singapore but was not successful. Upon his departure from Penang he was able to take only the amount of baggage which he could carry in his hands since it was necessary to walk from his residence to the dock. The remaining household and personal effects were necessarily abandoned for lack of transport facilities.

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Claim of Harold D. Robison, Foreign Service officer, class VII.

Mr. Robison was assigned to the consulate general at Singapore, Straits Settlements. Mr. Robison was forced to leave Singapore on 2 hours' notice as the Japanese forces were rapidly approaching the city. He was obliged to abandon his household and many personal effects which were in his residence in Singapore. It is doubtful if recovery of any of these effects will be possible.

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Claim of Charles 0. Thompson, Foreign Service officer, unclassified.

Mr. Thompson was assigned to the consulate general at Singapore when war broke out between Japan and the United States. His wife and children left Singapore December 12, 1941, but were able to take with them a minimum of personal effects. Mr. Thompson was unable to bring out his household effects when he departed from Singapore because of lack of shipping space. Because of conditions in Singapore it is most unlikely that any of his effects will be recovered.

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Claim of Jesse F. Van Wickel, Foreign Service officer, class IV.

Mr. Van Wickel was assigned to the consulate general at Batavia, Java, when hostilities broke out between Japan and the United States. On February 16, 1942, he was instructed by Consul General Foote to leave Batavia immediately and proceed either to British India or Australia. Mr. Van Wickel had shipped the greater part of his effects to the United States in September 1941, keeping only those things absolutely needed for daily use. It was not possible for him to ship his automobile or any of these effects at the time of his departure and all the information which Mr. Van Wickel has received indicates that the Japanese took over all this property.

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Claim of Thomas S. Horn, Foreign Service officer, class VI.

Mr. Horn was assigned to Surabaya, Java, when war broke out between Japan and the United States. He was forced to leave his effects behind upon his departure. Although they were placed in the custody of the Swiss Consular Agent, the Department has been unable to obtain any definite information concerning their condition. Because of conditions prevailing in Surabaya after the entry of the Japanese, there is little likelihood that they have not been confiscated or destroyed.

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Claim of John B. Ketcham, Foreign Service officer, class VI.

Mr. Ketcham was assigned to Medan, Sumatra, Netherlands Indies, at the outbreak of war between Japan and the United States. Having received orders from the Department to close the office he did so on February 16, 1942, and proceeded to Kota Radja in the northern part of Sumatra where he boarded an evacuation ship. His effects were stored in a warehouse on a rubber estate about 50 miles from Medan.

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Subsequent to the outbreak of war in Europe and the Far East and later when war broke out between Japan and the United States and Germany and the United States all transportation facilities became disrupted. Germany immediately embarked upon an intensive submarine warfare on all shipping, enemy and neutral alike. Claim of R. Borden Reams, Foreign Service officer, class VII.

Mr. Reams was assigned to Copenhagen and was transferred to the Department. En route to Washington he was interned by the Germans in Bad Nauheim. His effects were shipped to the United States from Copenhagen on the first trip of the exchange ship Gripsholm. When his effects were received and unpacked in July 1942 a number of articles were missing.

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Claim of Elizabeth Deegan, Foreign Service clerk.

Miss Deegan was assigned to the Embassy at Paris until December 19, 1940. At the outbreak of war she was forced to leave France on 24 hours' notice. She was transferred to Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Her furniture and effects were packed and shipped to her after her departure and after their arrival in Rio de Janeiro in August of 1941, many articles were found to be missing. It is believed that they were lost or stolen en route from Paris, France, to Rio de Janeiro.

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