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Claim of Leland C. Altaffer, vice consul.

Mr. Altaffer was in charge of the American consulate at Amoy, China, when the war between Japan and the United States broke out. He was arrested by the Japanese on the morning of December 8, 1941, and held at the Amoy Club for 1 month. During that time the consular premises, including his living quarters, were searched and certain articles belonging to him were taken away by the Japanese authorities.

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Claim of Myrl S. Myers, Foreign Service officer, class II.

Mr. Myers was assigned to the consulate at Canton, China. On December 8, 1941, shortly after 7 a. m., the Japanese soldiers removed certain personal property from the consular premises. Although receipts were requested he did not receive any.

In addition to the property in Canton there was certain personal property belonging to Mr. Myers which was in the consulate general in Hong Kong. After the occupation of the consular premises by the Japanese this property had disappeared.

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Claim of Walter Smith, Foreign Service officer, unclassified.

Mr. Smith was assigned to the Consulate at Canton when war broke out between Japan and the United States. He was returned to the United States on the first exchange vessel and was forced to leave his effects in Canton. Information in the Department indicates that there is every reason to believe that his effects have been destroyed or confiscated.

Name

Olaimed Disallowed Approved

Walter Smith, Foreign Service officer, unclassified...

$1, 210

$1, 210 MUKDEN, MANCHURIA

Claim of Kenneth C. Krentz, Foreign Service officer, class VI.

Mr. Krentz was assigned to Mukden, Manchuria, at the outbreak of war between Japan and the United States. Neither the Swiss nor any other neutral authorities were allowed to communicate with Mr. Krentz. It was necessary for him to sell certain of his personal property in order to obtain funds for his living expenses. Permission to store his household and other remaining effects was refused. He was informed they must remain in his house and that they would be "looked after" by the Japanese police. Information received by him from Japanese sources indicated that those effects would soon "disappear."

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Claim of Frank P. Lockhart, Foreign Service officer, class I.

Mr. Lockhart was assigned to Shanghai at the time war broke out between Japan and the United States. He was not allowed to bring his car back with him on the exchange ship, and the Japanese authorities refused to allow him to sell it. It was necessary for him to abandon it and undoubtedly the Japanese authorities seized it for their own use.

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Claim of Frederick D. Hunt, Foreign Service officer, unclassified.

Mr. Hunt was assigned to the consulate general at Shanghai at the time of the outbreak of hostilities between Japan and the United States. The Japanese gendarmerie removed a Studebaker Champion standard sedan from the garage where Mr. Hunt had kept it.

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Claim of H. Lawrence Groves, Foreign Service officer, class II.

Mr. Groves was assigned to the consulate general at Shanghai when war broke out between Japan and the United States. On February 8, 1942, without any previous warning or advice the Japanese authorities seized his 1941 Studebaker President sedan which was in the Mark L. Moody garage in the French concession.

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Claim of Carl O. Hawthorne, vice consul.

Mr. Hawthorne was assigned to Tsinan, Shantung, Japaneseoccupied China. He was detained in his home at Tsinan by the Japanese from December 8, 1941, until June 13, 1942, at which time he was sent to Shanghai for repatriation. While under detention he was forced to sell at a sacrifice personal and household effects in order to obtain funds for living expenses.

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Claim of Harry Kushner, Foreign Service clerk.

Mr. Kushner was assigned to the consulate general, Tientsin, China, but was on a temporary detail in the Embassy at Peiping at the time hostilities between Japan and the United States began. In January 1942 the Japanese authorities in Tientsin confiscated his radio victrola, leaving a "certificate of seizure" with his servant.

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Claim of Richard H. Davis, Foreign Service clerk, unclassified.

Mr. Davis was assigned to the consulate in Tsingtao, China, at the time of the outbreak of war between Japan and the United States. He was confined to the American consular quarters, under guard of the Japanese military authorities, from December 8, 1941, until June 8. 1942, In May he was permitted to pack and bring his household effects from his house to the consular premises. Upon his departure from Tsingtao he was allowed to bring only his clothes and certain effects and the remainder of his effects were stored in the consular quarters. However, the Japanese authorities seized and took away his Mercury convertible sedan and his Scott radio victrola. The Mercury was insured for ordinary risks.

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BRITISH CROWN COLONY

HONG KONG

Claim of Robert W. Rinden, Foreign Service officer, unclassified.

Mr. Rinden was assigned to Hong Kong in December 1941 wben war broke out between Japan

and the United States. When Hong Kong fell to the Japanese, Mr. Rinden was informally confined to the Hong Kong-Shanghai Bank Building. There was much looting. Although repeated requests were made that he be allowed to return to his apartment to get badly needed clothing, he was not allowed to do so until the latter part of January 1942. The apartment had been ransacked and most of his property had disappeared.

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Claim of Fong Chuck, Foreign Service clerk.

Mr. Chuck was a Foreign Service clerk at Canton, China. In January 1938, he was assigned to Hong Kong where he remained until July 9, 1940. At that time he was reassigned to the consulate at Canton but was not allowed to take his family with him because of unsafe conditions there. In June 1941 his family was evacuated from Hong Kong but did not take with them their household effects. These were stored with friends in Hong Kong:

On December 7, 1941 when the Japanese entered Canton certain property belonging to Mr. Chuck were seized by the Japanese authorities and no receipts were given him. The effects which were left in Hong Kong must be considered lost or destroyed as a result of the bombing of that city at the time of the Japanese occupation.

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Claim of Addison Southard, Foreign Service officer, class I.

Mr. Southard was consul general at Hong Kong at the time war broke out with Japan. Upon his departure from Hong Kong he packed his silver, glassware, dishes, and other household furnishings with the expectation of bringing them with him on the Gripsholm. He was not permitted to do so and they remained in Hong Kong in the hands of the Japanese. On the second trip of the Gripsholm seven pieces of baggage were recovered by Mr. Southard. However, three of the seven pieces were practically empty and, with the exception of the silverware the remaining contents were badly damaged or entirely destroyed.

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Claim of Robert S. Ward, Foreign Service officer, class VI.

Mr. Ward was assigned to Hong Kong when war broke out between Japan and the United States. He was interned by the Japanese and was unable to take any steps to protect his property against damage by shelling and bombing.

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Claim of Marjory Mills, Foreign Service clerk.

Miss Mills was assigned to Hong Kong when that city was occupied by the Japanese. At the outbreak of war, December 8, 1941, she was compelled to leave her apartment and live in the home of Consul John W. Bruins. She made numerous requests of the Japanese authorities to be permitted to return to her apartment to collect her personal property but such requests were denied. From all reports it appears that the apartment was taken over by the Japanese marines and the clothing and furniture were distributed among their friends.

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Claim of Eleanor M. Shields, Foreign Service clerk.

Miss Shields was assigned to the consulate general in Hong Kong when war with Japan broke out. Miss Shields had taken this personal property,

consisting of jewelry, with her to the offices of the United States War Department in the Hong Kong-Shanghai Bank Building which was considered the safest place at that time. The Japanese were looting all valuables that could be found. The Goyernment personnel were forced to leave the building for a period of 24 hours and upon their return the jewelry had disappeared.

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Claim of Thomas A. Hicock, Foreign Service officer, class VI.

Mr. Hicock was assigned to Manila, P. I., but was on home leave at the time war broke out between Japan and the United States. Since he expected to return to his post at the expiration of his leave he left his effects in care of the consulate. Information available indicates that his effects were confiscated by the Japanese authorities.

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