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JANUARY 29, 1945.-Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the

state of the Union and ordered to be printed

Mr. COLE of New York, from the Committee on Naval Affairs,

submitted the following

REPORT

[To accompany H. R. 1646]

The Committee on Naval Affairs, to whom was referred the bill (H. R. 1646) to establish the grade of admiral in the Coast Guard, and for other purposes, having considered the same, report favorably thereon without amendment and recommend that the bill do pass.

The purpose of the bill is to establish the grade and rank of admiral on the active list of the Coast Guard and to authorize the appointment of an officer holding the office of Commandant of the Coast Guard to that grade and rank.

Section 1 of the bill establishes the grade and rank of admiral on the active list of the Coast Guard and authorizes the President, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, to appoint an officer holding the office of Commandant of the Coast Guard to that grade and rank. It provides that there shall be only one officer on the active list in the grade and rank of admiral at any one time.

Section 2 would provide that appointments under the bill shall be made without examination and shall continue in force during such period as the President shall determine. It would also preserve the permanent and temporary status and eligibility for promotion of an officer holding the rank of admiral pursuant to appointment under section 1.

Section 3 would fix an appointee'e pay and allowances at the same amounts as those of a rear admiral of the upper half, plus a personal money allowance of $2,200 per annum

Section 4 would provide that, in the discretion of the President, and by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, an officer who shall have been appointed under the bill shall have, upon retirement, the highest grade and rank held by him on the active list, and retired pay equal to 75 percent of the pay of such grade and rank. The second proviso to this section would limit appointments to the grade and rank of admiral on the active list of the Coast Guard to those made as provided in the bill. Under this proviso no officer could be appointed under section 1 except one who, at the time of appointment, holds the office of Commandant.

Section 5 would limit the period during which the bill would be effective to the duration of the war and 6 months thereafter.

At the present time the Coast Guard consists of more than 12,700 officers and 157,000 enlisted personnel. Five years ago the total number of personnel of the Coast Guard on active service was less than 13,000. As of March 26, 1942, when the Commandant of the Coast Guard was advanced from the rank of rear admiral to vice admiral, his present rank, the personnel numbered approximately 42,000. Since that time, less than 3 years, the size of the organization has increased more than four times to its present total of approximately 170,000 officers and enlisted personnel, plus 50,000 members of the Coast Guard Temporary Reserve added since 1943.

The size and accomplishments of the Coast Guard, in the opinion of the committee, constitute ample basis for the proposed legislation.

The bill has the approval of the Navy Department, as indicated by the following letter from the Secretary of the Navy to the chairman of the Committee on Naval Affairs, which is made a part of this report.

Navy DEPARTMENT,

Washington, D. C. Hon. CARL Vinson, Chairman of the Committee on Naval Affairs,

House of Representatives, Washington, D. C. MY DEAR MR. CHAIRMAN: The bill, H. R. 1646, to establish the grade of admiral in the Coast Guard, and for other purposes, was referred by your committee to the Navy Department with request for a report thereon.

The purpose of the proposed legislation is to establish the grade and rank of admiral on the active list of the Regular Coast Guard and to authorize the appointment of an officer holding the office of Commandant of the Coast Guard to that grade and rank. Only such an officer could be appointed under the bill, by reason of a proviso to section 4.

Section 2 of the bill would preserve the permanent and temporary status and eligibility for promotion of an officer appointed thereunder. Under section 3 the appointee's pay and allowances would be the same as those of a rear admiral of the upper half, plus a personal money allowance of $2,200 per annum.

Section 4 would provide that, in the discretion of the President, and by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, an officer who shall have been appointed under the bill shall have, upon retirement, the highest grade and rank held by him on the active list, and retired pay equal to 75 percent of the pay of such grade and rank.

Section 5 would limit the effectiveness of the proposed legislation to the duration of the war and 6 months thereafter.

It is the view of the Navy Department that the present size of the Coast Guard and the scope of its operations justify the proposed legislation. The Navy Department, therefore, has no objection to the enactment of H. R. 1646.

The Navy Department has been informally advised by the Bureau of the Budget that there would be no objection to the submission of the above report to the Congress. Sincerely yours,

O

DISPOSING OF SUNDRY PAPERS

JANUARY 31, 1945.—Ordered to be printed

Mr. Elliott, from the Joint Committee on Disposition of Executive

Papers submitted the following

REPORT

The joint select committee of the Senate and House of Representatives appointed on the part of the Senate and House of Representatives, and acting in compliance with the provisions of the act approved July 7, 1943 (57 Stat. 380), respectfully reports to the Senate and House of Representatives that it has received and examined the report of the Archivist of the United States No. 45–21, dated January 22, 1945, to the Seventy-ninth Congress, first session, submitting the following lists or schedules, or parts of lists or schedules, covering records proposed for disposal by the Government agencies indicated:

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Your committee reports that the records proposed for disposal in the said lists or schedules, or parts of lists or schedules, reported by the Archivist of the United States do not, or will not after the lapse of the period specified, have sufficient administrative, legal, research, or other value to warrant their continued preservation by the Government and recommends that their disposal be accomplished, subject to the provisions of section 9 of the aforementioned act, in accordance with the regulations promulgated by The National Archives Council under the provisions of said act. Respectfully submitted to the Senate and House of Representatives.

A. J. ELLIOTT, Chairman,

B. W. GEARHART,
Members on the part of the House.

ALBEN W. BARKLEY,

OWEN BREWSTER,
Members on the part of the Senate.
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GRANTING TO THE HAWAIIAN ELECTRIC CO., LTD., THE

RIGHT TO CONSTRUCT CERTAIN DITCHES, TUNNELS, AND OIL PIPE LINES IN PEARL HARBOR, T. H.

JANUARY 31, 1945.—Committed. to the Committee of the Whole House on the

state of the Union and ordered to be printed

Mr. FARRINGTON, from the Committee on Nayal Affairs, submitted

the following

REPORT

[To accompany H. R. 1808]

The Committee on Naval Affairs, to whom was referred the bill (H. R. 1808) to grant to the Hawaiian Electric Co., Ltd., the right to construct certain ditches, tunnels, and oil pipe lines in Pearl Harbor, T. H., having considered the same, report favorably thereon without amendment and recommend that the bill do pass.

The purpose of the bill H. R. 1808 is to grant to the Hawaiian Electric Co., Ltd., a Hawaiian corporation, its successors, and assigns, the right to construct, maintain, and operate intake and discharge ditches, and tunnels for the purpose of taking salt water from and discharging it into Pearl Harbor, Oahu, T. H., and to lay, maintain, and operate oil pipe lines from ship's moorings to the company's properties at Waiau, Ewa, Oahu, in the area in Pearl Harbor between the southern boundaries of the company's presently owned properties at Waiau as shown on the company's map W-1614, dated September 26, 1940, filed in the office of the Secretary of the Navy, and the — 20-foot contour line in Pearl Harbor. The authority granted in the proposed bill is necessary in order to enable the company to enlarge its facilities for the generation of electricity.

At the present time all naval activities in the Pearl Harbor area, with the exception of the navy yard, are almost entirely dependent on the Hawaiian Electric Co. for power, and the Army, with practically no generating capacity in Oahu, buys its electricity either from the Navy or from Hawaiian Electric Co. The Navy's production capacity is now almost up to its limit, and if its biggest generating unit (10,000 kilowatts) went out, it could not supply the demand. The Navy Department, therefore,

considers that an expansion of the generating capacity of Hawaiian Electric Co., will be to the interest of the Navy as well as to the general public.

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