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FEBRUARY 8, 1945.-Referred to the House Calendar and ordered to be printed

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Mr. BURCH, from the Committee on the Post Office and Post Roads,

submitted the following

REPORT

(To accompany H. R. 304)

The Committee on the Post Office and Post Roads, to whom was
referred the bill (H. R. 304) to amend the act authorizing postmasters
in Alaska to administer oaths and affirmations, having considered the
same, report favorably thereon without amendment and recommend

A similar bill" (H. R. 4919) was reported favorably by your com-
mittee and passed unanimously by the House in the Seventy-eighth
Congress but did not reach the floor of the Senate for consideration.

that the bill do pass.

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PURPOSE OF LEGISLATION The purpose of the bill is stated in the title. All the bill is existing law except the words or of the Legislature of the Territory of Alaska, appearing on page 2, line 3.

By reason of unique conditions existing in Alaska, vast in area and so that many of them are required to travel long distances when it

or in isolated camps remote from centers of population becomes necessary for them to take oaths or make acknowledgments Stat. 1219), Congress gave relief by providing that oaths, affirmarequired by law. In 1939, by act approved August 5 of that year (53 tions, or acknowledgments might be taken where "authorized, permitted, or required by any act or acts of Congress.” created is not sufficient because oaths to birth certificates and other

Now under actual experience it has been found that the relief thus papers are required under acts of the Legislature of Alaska. The by permitting those residents to take oaths or affirmations whether convenience of many residents of the Territory would be greatly served

required by acts of Congress or by the Territorial legislature before the nearest postmaster. Alaska is fairly well supplied with mail service, and postmasters may be found in practically every community and settlement in the Territory.

The passage of this legislation will not impose any financial burden whatever upon the Federal Government or the Territorial government.

The enactment of this legislation was recommended by the Post Office Department in a letter dated September_1, 1944, addressed to the chairman of the committee by the Postmaster General which also indicates that the Bureau of the Budget has no objection to the measure. The Postmaster General's letter follows:

Post OFFICE DEPARTMENT,

Washington, D. C., September 1, 1944. Hon. Thomas G. BURCH, Chairman, Committee on the Post Office and Post Roads,

House of Representatives. MY DEAR MR. BURCH: Reference is made to your request for a report upon H. R. 4919, a bill to amend the act authorizing postmasters in Alaska to administer oaths and affirmations.

The only difference between existing law and H. R. 4919 is the addition of the final clause "or of the Legislature of the Territory of Alaska."

No doubt this proposed amendment would be beneficial to the residents of Alaska, and this Department has no objection to the enactment of the measure.

It has been ascertained from the Bureau of the Budget that this report is in accord with the program of the President. Sincerely yours,

FRANK C. WALKER,

Postmaster General. In compliance with paragraph 2a of rule XIII of the Rules of the House of Representatives, changes in existing law made by the bill, as introduced, are shown as follows (new matter is printed in italics, existing law in which no change is proposed is shown in roman):

ACT OF August 5, 1939 (53 Stat. 1219) Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That each postmaster within the Territory of Alaska is hereby authorized and directed to administer oaths and affirmations and to take acknowledgments, and to make and execute certificates thereof, and to perform all other functions of a notary public within said Territory, whenever an oath, affirmation, or acknowledgment or a certificate thereof is authorized, permitted, or required by any Act or Acts of Congress, or of the Legislature of the Territory of Alaska.

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AUTHORIZING PAYMENTS OF REWARDS TO POSTAL

EMPLOYEES FOR INVENTIONS

FEBRUARY 8, 1945.-Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the

state of the Union and ordered to be printed

Mr. McKenzie, from the Committee on the Post Office and Post

Roads, submitted the following

REPORT

(To accompany H. R. 744)

The Committee on the Post Office and Post Roads, to whom was referred the bill (H. R. 744) authorizing payments of rewards to postal employees for inventions, having considered the same, report favorably thereon without amendment and recommend that the bill do pass.

A similar bill (H. R. 3998) was reported favorably by your committee and passed unanimously by the House in the Seventy-eighth Congress, but failed to reach the floor of the Senate for consideration. The purpose of this proposed legislation is to encourage inventions

suggestions by employees which result in improvements and economies in the Postal Service, and to provide for the payment of suitable rewards for same. There is quoted below a letter addressed to the Speaker of the House by the Postmaster General under date of January 4, 1944, recommending this legislation and explaining its desirability, as

and

follows:

Hon. Sam RAYBURN,

Post OFFICE DEPARTMENT,

Washington, D. C., January 4, 1944. Speaker, House of Representatives. MY DEAR MR. RAYBURN: On April 14, 1943, there was appointed at each of the 15 division headquarters for the States within such divisions, a "committee oni suggestions and experiments for the Postal Service” with a central com. mittee in Washington. The purpose was to interest postal personnel in suggesting improvements in the service.

Many of our best suggestions have been presented by postal workers and placed to effect without any thought of recognition, or hope of reward. However, believing that outstanding contributions to efficient postal service should be recognized, and rewarded in a financial way, legislation to that end is recom

mended.

H. Repts., 79-1, vol. 1-15

There is submitted herewith a draft of a proposed bill authorizing payment of rewards to postal employees for inventions or suggestions in a sum not exceeding $25,000 in any one fiscal year, or $1,000 for any one invention, suggestion, or series of suggestions, to be paid from appropriations for postal activities benefiting, as the Postmaster General may determine. The suggestion program idea has been successful in practically all large industries. The Post Office Department, as the result of a Bulletin notice to officers and personnel, now has on hand some 2,500 suggestions, a number of which will produce economies in operation and improved service beyond the cost of any rewards that may be given.

It has been ascertained from the Bureau of the Budget that this recommendation for legislation is in accord with the program of the President. Very truly yours,

FRANK C. WALKER,

Postmaster General. O

ENS

RIVER AND HARBOR OMNIBUS BILL

FEBRUARY 8, 1945.-Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the

state of the Union and ordered to be printed

Mr. MANSFIELD of Texas, from the Committee on Rivers and Harbors,

submitted the following

REPORT

[To accompany S. 35)

December.

The Committee on Rivers and Harbors, to whom was referred the
bill (S. 35) authorizing the construction, repair, and preservation of
certain public works on rivers and harbors, and for other purposes,
having considered the same; report favorably thereon without amend-
ment and recommend that the bill do pass.
The bill contains 291 projects for improvement, estimated to cost
$381,968,332. These projects were all approved by both Senate and
House in the preceding Congress in the bill (H. R. 3961), which died
on the calendar at the end of the Seventy-eighth Congress last

Ten projects in the bill, involving an expenditure of $13,259,600,
are recommended by the Army or naval authorities as being urgent
in the war. Twelve other projects in the bill were considered of such
urgency that they have already been completed out of the war funds
appropriated for the Army or the Navy. Some of these projects are
now in need of repairs, and the President has recommended that they

approved by Congress in order to be eligible for maintenance expenditures. Projects in the bill other than those necessary in the war effort are not to be eligible for appropriation until peace is established, when their construction will afford at least partial relief from an acute employment situation.

The bill is the successor of H. R. 3961 in the last Congress, which passed the House March 22, and passed the Senate December 12, 1944. That bill died in conference at the end of the Seventy-eighth Congress. Every project now embraced in the pending bill was agreed to by the conferees on H. R. 3961, and approved by both Senate and House. The only point in disagreement was the provision amending the reclamation law pertaining to the Central Valley project in

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