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79TH CONGRESS

18t Session

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

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REPORT No. 249

AUTHORIZING THE EXPENSES OF CONDUCTING THE IN. VESTIGATION AUTHORIZED BY HOUSE RESOLUTION 93, SEVENTY-NINTH CONGRESS

MARCH 5, 1945.-Referred to the House Calendar and ordered to be printed

Mr. COCHRAN, from the Committee on Accounts, submitted the

following

REPORT

[To accompany H. Res. 159)

The Committee on Accounts, to whom was referred the resolution (H. Res. 159) authorizing the expenses of conducting the investigation authorized by House Resolution 93, Seventy-ninth Congress, having considered the same, report favorably thereon without amend ment and recommend that the resolution do pass.

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PROVIDING FUNDS FOR EXPENSES OF CONDUCTING THE INVES-
TIGATION AUTHORIZED BY HOUSE RESOLUTION 38 OF THE
SEVENTY-EIGHTH CONGRESS AND CONTINUED BY HOUSE
RESOLUTION 54 OF THE SEVENTY-NINTH CONGRESS

MARCH 5, 1945.-Referred to the House Calendar and ordered to be printed

Mr. COCHRAN, from the Committee on Accounts, submitted the

following

REPORT

[To accompany H. Res. 160]

The Committee on Accounts, to whom was referred the resolution
(H. Res. 160) providing for the expenses of conducting the investiga-
tion authorized by House Resolution 38 of the Seventy-eighth Con-
gress and continued by House Resolution 54 of the Seventy-ninth
Congress, having considered the same, report favorably thereon with-
out amendment and recommend that the resolution do pass.

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HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

79TH CONGRESS

1st Session

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REPORT No. 251

AUTHORIZING THE EXPENSES OF CONDUCTING THE

INVESTIGATION AUTHORIZED BY HOUSE RESOLUTION 20, SEVENTY-NINTH CONGRESS

MARCH 6, 1948.-Referred to the House Calendar and ordered to be printed

Mr. COCHRAN, from the Committee on Accounts, submitted the

following

REPORT

(To accompany H. Res. 161)

The Committee on Accounts, to which was referred the resolution (H. Res. 161) providing funds for expenses of conducting studies and investigations authorized by House Resolution 20, of the Seventyninth Congress, having considered the same, report favorably thereon without amendment and recommend that the resolution do pase

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AUTHORIZING THE NATURALIZATION OF FILIPINOS

MARCH 6, 1945.-Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the state

of the Union and ordered to be printed

Mr. DICKSTEIN, from the Committee on Immigration and Naturali

zation, submitted the following

REPORT

(To accompany H. R. 776)

The Committee on Immigration and Naturalization, to whom was referred the bill (H. R. 776) to authorize the naturalization of Filipinos, having considered the same, report favorably thereon without amendment and recommend that the bill do pass.

PURPOSE OF THE BILL

The purpose of the bill is to make racially eligible for naturalization Philippine persons or persons of Philippine descent.

GENERAL INFORMATION

Prior to the Seventy-eighth Congress the only persons (except for limited special classes such as ex-servicemen, etc.) racially eligible to naturalization were persons of the white or African black races or persons of races indigenous to the Western Hemisphere (meaning American Indians). On December 17, 1943, an act was approved making Chinese persons racially eligible for naturalization and granting such persons a small quota which, figured under the national origins principle of the 1924 Quota Act, amounts to 105 a year.

Filipinos have been nationals of the United States, but not citizens, since the acquisition of the Philippine Islands. They have a peculiar political status in that while being nationals of the United States, they are not citizens, and, of course, being nationals, they likewise were not aliens. Under section 8 of the Philippine Independence Act of 1934, they were declared to be aliens and were granted an annual quota of 60 for the interim period between the date of the act and the date independence becomes effective.

The committee is of the opinion that the country owes to these people-our own nationals—who have been loyal to us in every respect and who have fought so courageously against a common enemy, the Japanese, the right to become citizens of the United States. Under the provisions of this bill, if enacted, persons of the Philippine race will be eligible to come to the United States under their quota of 50 per annum even after the Philippine Islands become an independent country, a privilege which would not run to them in the event they remained of a race ineligible to naturalization.

The figures of the Alien Registration Division of the Immigration and Naturalization Service, as of 1940, showed there were 45,321 noncitizen Filipinos in continental United States at that time and a balance of 38,735 in our outlying possessions, the great majority of whom reside in Hawaii. This total of 84,056 represents the major portion of the question at hand because since 1934, and also in the future if this bill is enacted into law, not more than 50 Filipinos could enter the United States annually as immigrants.

The bill is endorsed by the Attorney General and the Secretaries of State and Interior.

At the hearing on the comparable bill the Seventy-eighth Congress, representatives of the various veterans' organizations, and others, including representatives of Philippine organizations, appeared and vigorously endorsed the measure. No one appeared in opposition. Also, at this hearing, a representative of the Department of Justice appeared before the committee and explained the necessity for the bill.

There are quoted herewith letters from the Attorney General and the Secretary of State expressing the views of their Departments on the comparable bill in the Seventy-eighth Congress. They read as follows:

NOVEMBER 23, 1944. Hon. Samuel DICKSTEIN, Chairman, Committee on Immigration and Naturalization,

House of Representatives, Washington, D. C. MY DEAR MR. CHAIRMAN: This is in response to your request for my views concerning a bill (H. R. 4826) to authorize the naturalization of Filipinos.

Section 1 of the bill proposes to amend section 303 of the Nationality Act of 1940 (8 U.S. C. 703), which enumerates the persons who are racially eligible to naturali. zation, i. e., white persons, persons of African nativity or descent, descendants of races indigenous to the Western Hemisphere, and Chinese persons and persons of Chinese descent. It is proposed to add the following provisions to the enumeration: “Filipino persons or persons of Filipino descent.

Section 2 of the bill proposes to amend section 324 (a) of the act relating to the naturalization of persons who have served honorably in the armed forces of the United States, by striking therefrom the words "Including a native-born Filipino." This phrase will serve no purpose if Filipinos will become eligible to naturalization.

Section 1 of the proposed bill omits an important provision found in existing law. Section 303 of the Nationality Act at present contains a proviso to the effect that nothing in that section shall prevent the naturalization of native-born Filipinos having honorable service in the armed forces of the United States or of former citizens of the United States who are otherwise eligible to naturalization under the provisions of section 317 (8 U. S. C. 717). The section facilitates the naturalization of persons who have been citizens of the United States, but who lost United States citizenship prior to September 22, 1922, by marriage to an alien or by the spouse's loss of United States citizenship, as well as the naturalize tion of persons who lost United States citizenship on or after September 22, 1922, by marriage to an alien inadmissible to citizenship. The bill omits the entire proviso. The first part of the proviso would no longer serve any useful purpose if the bill is enacted, but the second part should be retained. It is, therefore,

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