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A RESOLUTION AUTHORIZING A STUDY BY THE
COMMITTEE ON EDUCATION OF THE EFFECT
OF CERTAIN WAR ACTIVITIES UPON

COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES

SUBMITTED BY MR, BARDEN

FEBRUARY 23, 1945.-Referred to the Committee of Whole House on the

state of the Union and ordered to be printed, with illustrations

UNITED STATES
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE

WASHINGTON : 1945

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

79TH CONGRESS

1st Session

REPORT No. 214

EFFECT OF CERTAIN WAR ACTIVITIES UPON COLLEGES

AND UNIVERSITIES

February 23, 1945.-Referred to the Committee of the Whole House on the state

of the Union and ordered to be printed, with illustrations

Mr. BARDEN, from the Committee on Education, submitted the

following

REPORT

(Pursuant to H. Res. 63]

The Committee on Education was authorized and directed by House Resolution 592 (78th Cong.) and House Resolution 63 (79th Cong.) to make a study of higher education to determine what effect the war has had upon colleges and universities and to make recommendations to the House for legislation to alleviate such effects.

In carrying out the instructions of the House, the Committee on Education appointed a small staff and an advisory committee of leaders in the field of higher education. The advisory committee was selected to represent widely different geographic areas in the United States, and educational institutions of varying types and size, church-related colleges, small coeducational institutions, and large universities. The members of the staff and of the advisory committee are: Francis J. Brown, director

Herluf V. Olsen, assistant direcCloyd H. Marvin, chairman

tor Charles Anderson

Herbert Herring William Couper

Rev. William Murphy, S. J. Herman L. Donovan

Homer P. Rainey Walter C. Eells

Robert Stewart Calvert Ellis

G. Herbert Smith

Roscoe L. West The staff and the advisory committee were at work for 6 months on the study. They have submitted a unanimous report which I am glad to transmit to the House. Due to the pressure of time the Committee on Education has not specifically endorsed any of the recommendations. It does, however, transmit them to the House for its consideration.

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The Committee on Education plans in the very near future to consider the advisability of making definite recommendations to the House for legislation dealing with the present problems.

The advisory committee found that although the war has not equally affected the institutions of higher education, there are many that face a critical financial situation. This situation, for these institutions, apparently will not improve and the study definitely shows that for them it will tend to grow worse rather than better. The advisory committee has proposed a definite formula following the plans of Government in its relation to higher education to assist these institutions in standing by to render the necessary services to veterans and others when the war is over. The proposal is for a stand-by contract, without Federal control, and terminating 6 months after the end of the war and for any individual institution when it is no longer in a critical financial situation.

The advisory committee also found that the war has brought on the need for coordination of research on a national basis. It also recommended retention of research in the colleges and universities throughout the country in order that young men and women may be trained in research techniques.

In implementing its recommendations the advisory committee has volunteered to be of such assistance as the Committee on Education deems desirable and to render such assistance without cost to the Government. The Committee on Education consequently proposes to continue to use the advice and counsel of the advisory committee which they have so generously tendered without cost to the United States Government.

This has been a unique experience in education. It has more than demonstrated its value. The report is submitted to the House for such consideration and legislative action as might be deemed necessary and advisable to take.

LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL

Washington, D. C., February 1, 1945. The Honorable GRAHAM A. BARDEN, Chairman, Committee on Education,

House of Representatives, Washington, D. C. MY DEAR MR. BARDEN: On behalf of the advisory committee and the staff appointed and authorized by the Committee on Education to make a study of higher education, we have the honor of transmitting to you the report, together with recommendations for consideration by your committee. The study was made pursuant to House Resolution 592 (78th Cong.) and House Resolution 63 (79th Cong.).

It has been a privilege to work with you and the members of the Committee on Education during the past months. Each member of the advisory committee and the staff deeply appreciate the opportunity which has been given him. As the appointment of this committee is unique in the history of educational legislation, so, seldom if ever, has a committee worked in an atmosphere of such eager interest, genuiue appreciation, and wholehearted cooperation.

One way in which the advisory committee and the staff can express their gratitude is by "standing by" to be of any possible assistance to you in translating the recommendations into constructive legis. lation. Sincerely yours,

FRANCIS J. BROWN,
Director, Study of Higher Education.

HERLUF V. OLSEN,
Assistant Director.

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