Lapas attēli
PDF
ePub

S00110-010
Standard Industrial Classification Manual. Statistical
Policy Division, OMB. 1972. 649 pp.
Budget Function/Subfunction: Executive direction and
management (802).
Public Availability: GPO, Stock No. 4101-0066, $6.75.
Agency Contact: Phillip B. Larsen, Acting Assistant to the
Director for Administration. 395-5163.

This manual contains a complete list of every defined industry in the United States, and as such contains a listing of thousands of industries. What is referred to as the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) was developed for use in the classification of establishments by type of activity in which they are engaged. This was done for the purpose of facilitating the collection, tabulation, presentation, and analysis of data relating to establishments; and for promoting uniformity and comparability in the presentation of statistical data collected by the various agencies of the U.S. Government, state agencies, trade associations, and private research organizations. The SIC is intended to cover the entire field of economic activities, including agriculture, forestry, fishing, hunting, and trapping; mining; construction; manufacturing transportation, communications, electric, gas, and sani. tary services; wholesale and retail trade; and many others.

data; (3) Federal credit data; (4) supplementary source document (SSD) data; and (5) receipt data. The informa. tion contained in these data provide all or a major portion of the data required to produce some of the several tables and analyses appearing in the Budget of the United States. A Master Account Title (MAT) File contains the titles of functions, agencies, bureaus and accounts that appear in the budget. The purpose of the MAT file is to provide titles for agencies, bureaus, and appropriation accounts as well as to maintain the integrity of the Budget Preparation System by ensuring that data applicable to a specific agency or bureau or data applicable to the appropriation accounts are properly processed and maintained. The MAT file is maintained in both batch and interactive modes. All subsystems of the Budget Preparation System (BPS) are dependent on the MAT file except that of the Treasury Combined Statement. Content of records may be altered as required by use of the Budget Update System.

S00110-013

S00110-011
Federal Information Exchange System (FIXS).
Budget Function/Subfunction: Executive direction and
management (802).
Agency Contact: Phillip D. Larsen, Acting Assistant to the
Director for Administration. 395-5163.

The purpose of this system is to collect and disseminate information on Federal outlays by geograph. ic location in the 50 states, territories and other areas administered by the United States. Obligations of all Government administered funds, except for those transactions which are not to the public, are reported by agency, program and type of assistance on a fiscal year basis for states, counties and incorporated cities over 25,000 in population. Additionally, the data are summa: rized at state and national levels by agency, program, Federal influence activities and budget function. A highlight of the summaries are tables which provide state rankings in terms of Federal outlays received by organi. zational unit, demographic characteristics and major functional classification. The system is operated for the Executive Office of the President by the Community Services Administration, and is a joint effort by the Federal Departments and Agencies. Copies of Federal Outlays reports are available from the National Technical Information Service (NTIS), Springfield, Virginia 22151.

Budget Status System (BSS).
Budget Function/Subfunction: Executive direction and
management (802).
Agency Contact: Phillip D. Larsen, Acting Assistant to the
Director for Administration. 395-5163.

The Budget Status System (BSS) encompases the set of programs which are most frequently used in storing, modifying, displaying, and analyzing budget information. This system includes programs which may be used to: (1) extract records from a Master File; (2) sort a Master File into a user-defined reorder sequence; (3) produce tabular reports; (4) edit/update (validate, add, delete or rearrange) a Master File; (5) list an entire file or selected records from a Master File; (6) perform special updates on a Master File; and, (7) save current output of any of the foregoing operations for the user. The user may execute any or all of these programs by calling the Budget Status System and specifying the names of the input and output files he will need. Only those files which will actually be accessed during the run need be specified. When the Budget Status System is called, it will prompt the user for the function to be executed.

S00110-014
Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance Magnetic Tape
System.
Budget Function/Subfunction: Executive direction and
management (802).
Agency Contact: Phillip D. Larsen, Acting Assistant to the
Director for Administration. 395-5163.

For each of the more than 1,000 programs listed in the Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA), an automated text record and characteristics record are maintained. The text record consists of full-text material for each program in the Catalog. Each major and subitem heading is preceded by a unique flag. Text information for a particular item can be extracted by scanning the text record for the unique item flag. The characteristics record consists of coded text material to identify the agency administering the program, coordina tion and notification requirements, type of grant, obliga tional and loan information, type of assistance, applicant eligibility, authorization data, etc. This system enables updating and interrogation of CFDA records for analyti cal, managerial and publication purposes.

S00110-012

Budget Preparation System (BPS).
Budget Function/Subfunction: Executive direction and
management (802).
Agency Contact: Phillip D. Larsen, Acting Assistant to the
Director for Administration. 395-5163.

The Budget Preparation System Master File contains approximately 31,500 records and consists of the following basic record types: (1) Program and Finance (P & F) Schedule data; (2) Object Classification Schedule

S00110-015

The OMB Long Range Projection System. Technical Paper Series. Budget Review Division, OMB. BRD/FAB 75-8. December 12, 1975. 8 pp. Budget Function/Subfunction: Executive direction and management (802). Agency Contact: Phillip B. Larsen, Acting Assistant to the Director for Administration, OMB. 395-5163.

The purpose of the long range budget projections, produced by the Office of Management and Budget, has been to provide a broad overview of to what extent existing programs and current Administration proposals commit anticipated future budget receipts. As broad overviews, these projections have appeared routinely in the Budget since 1971. At first, these published projections were limited to somewhat general statements and dealt only with total outlays and receipts. More recently, the projections have been more detailed. For instance, the 1976 Budget shows economic assumptions, receipts by source, outlays by controllability category, full-employ. ment receipts outlays, and budget authority and outlays by both major agency and function. This technical staff paper explains the process utilized in developing the projections, discusses how specific programs are project. ed, and describes the new Budget Update System (BUS) utilized in generating the current services budget, the April and July mid-session reports and the long range estimates to be used in the budget.

Agency Contact: Phillip B. Larsen, Acting Assistant to the Director for Administration, OMB. 395-5163.

In recent years, a number of Federal benefit programs have been modified to include statutory provisions tying benefit increases to the cost of living. In fiscal year 1974, more than 25 percent of budget outlays were for programs with such provisions. These cost-ofliving increases vary from program to program, occurring at different times with different frequencies and by different percentages. Recent rapid inflation has focused attention on the specific ways in which these adjustments are made. Part 1 of this technical staff paper describes the mechanics of these adjustments for all indexed Federal programs. Part II discusses the OMB computer model that is used to develop price assumptions and the corresponding percentage increases in benefit payments.

S00110-018
The Functional Classification in the Budget. Technical
Paper Series. Budget Review Division, OMB. BRD/FAB
75-7. November 17, 1975. 9 pp. + attachments.
Budget Function/Subfunction: Executive direction and
management (802).
Agency Contact: Phillip B. Larsen, Acting Assistant to the
Director for Administration, OMB. 395-5163.

The functional classification is one of the principal methods of classifying budgetary data. This classification has been used for nearly three decades as the framework for discussing the President's program in the budget document. The historical data tables for outlays in the budget are presented almost exclusively in functional terms, thereby providing a consistent basis for comparing changes in spending over a period of time. In addition, the Congressional Budget and Impoundment Control Act of 1974 (P.L. 93-344) requires that the Congress exercise control over the budget through use of targets by function. This provision means that the functional classification will not only be used to display the budget, but also to control it. This technical staff paper is designed to provide background information about the functional classification in order to facilitate understanding of the system, its uses and its limitations.

S00110-016

The OMB Model to Project Interest on the Public Debt.
Technical Paper Series. Budget Review Division, OMB.
BRD/FAB 75-5. August 11, 1975. 10 pp. + attachment.
Budget Function/Subfunction: Executive direction and
management (802).
Agency Contact: Phillip B. Larsen, Acting Assistant to the
Director for Administration, OMB. 395-5163.

The OMB model to project interest accrued on the public debt, first developed in the Fall of 1972, estimates budget outlays for interest on the public debt under alternative interest rate and borrowing assumptions. The model uses the public debt data published in the Treasury Department's Monthly Statement of the Public Debt of the United States (MSPD). The MSPD provides a detailed list of Treasury debt issues outstanding, showing the dollar amount of each issue outstanding, the date on which it was issued, the date on which it is payable, and the interest rate at which it was financed. This model calculates only interest on the public debt of the United States. (The government also pays interest on agency debt securities, tax refunds held longer than the statutory limit, and on agencies' uninvested funds held by the Treasury.) This technical staff paper is divided into two parts. Part I discusses the major categories of the public debt and how interest is accrued on each of these categories. Part II discusses the computer model itself and how it is operated and maintained.

S00110-019
Method of Projecting Outlays for Unemployment Assist-
ance. Technical Paper Series. Budget Review Division,
OMB. BRD/FAB 75-6. Ocotber 1, 1975. 9 pp.
Budget Function/Subfunction: Executive direction and
management (802).
Agency Contact: Phillip B. Larsen, Acting Assistant to the
Director for Administration, OMB. 395-5163.

Unemployment assistance outlays currently are among the most volatile of uncontrollable outlays in the Federal budget. Because unemployment rates are now outside the range of previous post World War II experience, and because recent legislation has extended benefits and coverage beyond previous experience, revised methods for projecting unemployment assistance outlays have evolved during the past year. While the method described in this technical staff paper is that being employed by OMB as of the date of publication, it is in no sense final. As new data become available or new unemployment assistance programs are enacted, further changes will be made. The present system for estimating unemployment assistance outlays consists of separate computer models to project (1) unemployment insurance

S00110-017

Automatic Cost-of-Living Increases in Federal Programs. Technical Paper Series. Budget Review Division, OMB. BRD/FAB 75-2. July 30, 1975. 8 pp. + attachment. Budget Function/Subfunction: Executive direction and management (802).

S00110-019

Office of the Special Representative for Trade Negotiations (STR)

trust fund outlays, which include regular unemployment benefits (weeks 1.26), extended benefits (weeks 27-39), and Federal supplemental benefits (weeks 40-65); and (2) outlays for special unemployment assistance (SUA). Unemployment assistance to Federal employees and exservicemen trade adjustment assistance and unemploy. ment disaster relief are not included in the models. The Federal supplemental benefits program extends benefits to workers who have exhausted regular and extended unemployment benefits; it is funded through the employ. ment trust fund from Federal unemployment tax receipts. SUA provides benefits to classes of workers not formally covered by the various State systems-mainly domestic workers, farm workers and State and local government employees--and is funded from general revenues. Be. cause the SUA model projects outlays for a relatively new unemployment assistance program, it is in an early stage of development and is based on very limited data. The reliability of the projections based on this model is therefore considerably less than that of the unemploy. ment trust fund model.

Agency Contact: Phillip B. Larsen, Acting Assistant to the Director for Administration, OMB. 395-5163.

The OMB project described in this technical staff paper took about three years of intermittent study and development. In its initial form it was designed to provide the data to the OMB leadership in order to assist in sharpening their perspective of the budget. As the system developed, it became possible to publish the results--initially in a staff paper entitled, 'Federal Budget Outlays in Constant Dollars' (OMB; April 2, 1974). Later data were published in the OMB data tables in Federal Government Finances and in the 1976 Budget-in-Brief. Data are currently available for the years 1940-1974 on 'actual' basis and for 1975 and 1976 on the basis of the estimates in the 1976 budget. The paper discusses the background and need to produce budget outlay data on a constant dollar basis, critical issues with regard to the OMB method of deflation, and the application of the basic principles. Tables show budget outlays in current and constant dollars consistent with the 1976 Budget, and the basic indexes used.

Office of the Special Representative for Trade Negotiations (STR)

s00113-001

S00110-020
The Federal Financing Bank and the Budget. Technical
Paper Series. Budget Review Division, OMB. BRD/FAB
76.1. January 26, 1976. 23 pp. + attachment.
Budget Function/Subfunction: Executive direction and
management (802).
Agency Contact: Phillip B. Larsen, Acting Assistant to the
Director for Administration, OMB. 395-5163.

The Federal Financing Bank (FFB) was created in December 1973 (P.L. 93-224) as an off-budget Federal agency operating under the Treasury Department. The principal purposes of the FFB are to coordinate and assist agency borrowing and Government-guaranteed borrowing and to reduce the cost to the Government of some of its borrowing activities. In order to achieve these purposes, the FFB was given the authority to puchase agency debt and Government-guaranteed obligations and, in turn, to finance these transactions by borrowing from the Treasury or the public. The FFB thus serves as a conduit for agency borrowing and Government-guaran. teed borrowing, and Treasury or FFB securities replace agency securities or Government-guaranteed obligations in the market. The operations of the FFB began in May 1974 and have become substantial. By December 30, 1975, its holdings of agency debt and Government guaranteed obligations totalled $17 billion. Part I of this paper analyzes the relationship between the FFB and the budget. Part II introduces the subject by describing the operations of the FFB. Part III states some general rules of budgetary accounting that comprise the framework within which FFB's transactions are recorded. Parts IV and V, respectively, explain the application of these rules for measuring FFB outlays and for calculating the effect of FFB on the different aggregations of Federal debt. Part VI discusses the exclusion of FFB from the budget, and Part VIII summarizes the availability of regularly published information about FFB's activities.

The Special Trade Representative's Centralized Data Base (STRCDB). Budget Function/Subfunction: Executive direction and management (802). Agency Contact: Steven J. Falken, Director of Management Information Systems. 395-3395.

The Special Trade Representative's Centralized Data Base (STRCDB) supports economic and statistical analy. sis of trade-related data which bear on trade negotia. tions, particularly the current round of multilateral trade negotiations. The STR Centralized Data Base contains the Tariff Study information prepared by the Secretariat of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) for 1970 and 1971, and the U.S. Trade and Tariff Data for 1970 through 1973. The GATT Tariff Study data identifies import categories for each of the 11 reporting parties (United States, Canada, European Economic Community, Japan, Austria, Finland, Norway, Sweden, Switzerland, Australia, and New Zealand), by the Brussels Tariff Nomenclature four-digit number and the applicable national tariff line classification code. The major information stored for each of the tariff lines includes: tariff line description, tariff rate, GATT binding status, the countries from which the products were imported, the dollar value of imports from each country, and the trade relationship between the importing and exporting countries. The U.S. data identify the U.S. imports by the Tariff Schedule United States (TSUS) Number. The major information recorded for each TSUS number is: TSUS description, tariff rate, the countries from which the products were imported, the gross and net quantities of imports from each country, the Gross and Net FOB and CIF dollar values of imports from each country, and the duties collected on imports. The STR Centralized Data Base is currently an analytical resource available to Federal Agencies concerned with trade negotiations and is not used for recurring production of regular outputs.

S00110-021

The Budget in Constant Dollars. Technical Paper Series. Budget Review Division, OMB. BRD/FAB 75.1. July 1, 1975. 9 pp. + tables. Budget Function/Subfunction: Executive direction and management (802).

Department of Agriculture

fied by each of the 312 programs. A given program can be in one and only one mission and operating goal; but, it may appear in more than one appropriation function, or sub-function. The number of programs reported by a given office ranges from one to fifty-two. These items of data are supplied by each office for its respective programs to be summarized by appropriation, mission, operating goals, etc. Each year's data are given in Dollars by Program Resource Measure except for man-years, which is a measure of manpower used in a given program. These data are forwarded to the Data Services Unit of the Budget Division in the Office of Management and Finance. The offices submitting data must follow a set of guidelines established by the Program Structure Dictionary and a set of general instructions. The data files are classified as 'administratively confidential, for office use only.' Each year program data from the system are forwarded to OMB and the Program Financial Plan (PFP) is produced for Departmental use in analyzing the programs of the Department. The PFP contains Targets and Resource information about the Department's programs.

S00200-003

S00200-001 *USDA Data Inventory. Office of Information Systems, USDA. 1973-1974. 7 vols. Budget Function/Subfunction: Agricultural research and services (352). Agency Contact: Peter J. Doyle, Chief, Paperwork Management Branch, Management Division. 447-5725.

The USDA Data Inventory provides a concise listing and description of the data files used or produced by agencies within the Department. Each of the first six volumes contains the program data requirements for one or two of the missions of the Department. (A mission is a grouping of Department-wide goals that characterize the Department's role in solving broad, national problems. The 10 missions are comprehensive and include all activities of USDA.) These volumes are: (1) Agricultural Exports. Foreign Agricultural Development; (2) Rural Development. Environmental Improvement and Resource Development and Use; (3) Support for Non-Federal Governments and Institutions. General Administration and Program Support; (4) Food and Nutrition. Consumer Services and Human Resource Development; (5) Agricultural Production and Marketing Efficiency; and (6) Farm Income. The seventh volume is a combined subject index which lists all subject terms contained in the preceding six volumes and the associated program data. Each of the first six volumes contains five sections in addition to the Introduction. Section II is the actual inventory of program data requirements reported by each agency as being used or produced in support of a program for which they have responsibility. They are listed alphabetically by title within a Department mission. Each entry in this inventory provides descriptive information about the data requirement as follows: data inventory number, title, the agency that reported use of the data, the time period to which the data relate, the accessibility of the data, the mode of processing currently being used, Program Data Requirement Identification number, subject index terms which describe the general subject matter contents of the requirement, an abstract describing the contents of the data included within the requirement, and the division, branch, or unit that can respond to questions concerning the data.

Program Evaluation Inventory. Office of Planning and
Evaluation, USDA. 1 vol. (loose-leaf).
Budget Function/Subfunction: Agricultural research and
services (352).
Public Availability: Office of Planning and Evaluation,
USDA.
Agency Contact: John Fedkin, Deputy Director, Office of
Planning and Evaluation. 447.7963.

This (USDA) Program Evaluation Inventory consists of a collection of one-page summaries of completed ex post facto program evaluation studies on the effective. ness and impacts of USDA programs. A Program Evaluation Inventory Record (PEIR) is included for each evaluation study completed by or for USDA agenecies under the USDA Program Evaluation System, and for selected studies completed and published by non-USDA sources. Each PEIR briefly summarizes the study finding, assesses the quality and reliability of the study, and identifies potential implications for policy and program decision-making. The inventory is updated as additional USDA program evaluations are completed and relevant evaluations from non-USDA sources become available. PIERs in the inventory are arranged by agency and program, or program groupings, within the following Assistant Secretary or Director areas: Agricultural Economics; International Affairs and Commodity Programs; Conservation, Research, and Education; Marketing and Consumer Services; and Rural Development.

S00200-004

S00200-002 *USDA Budget Status Source Data. Budget Function/Subfunction: Agricultural research and services (352). Agency Contact: Stephen B. Dewhurst, Budget Division, Office of Management and Finance. 447-6176.

These files are used to generate summaries for the Secretary's and the President's Budget Review of the USDA. Summaries are made by appropriation, account, function, office, mission, operating goal, title, and program for the ten Program Resource Measures and eight years of data. The Program Resource Measures covered are: budget authority, budget outlays, loan repayments, proprietary receipts, insured loan level, guaranteed loan level, direct loan level, grant level, program level, and man-years. There are 312 programs distributed among 11 missions, 40 operating goals, 129 appropriations, 12 functions, and 17 sub-functions. One or more of the Program Resource Measures are identi

List of Available Publications of the United States
Department of Agriculture. Compiled by Mattie W.
Johnson. Publications Division, Office of Communication.
List No. 11. December 1973. 190 pp.
Budget Function/Subfunction: Agricultural research and
services (352); Farm income stabilization (351).
Public Availability: On request to the Publications
Division, USDA.
Agency Contact: H. Nelson Fitton, Director, Publications
Division. 447-6623.

This book lists the publications of the U.S. Depart. ment of Agriculture available as of July 1973. Depart. ment publications are intended primarily for farmers, consumers, homemakers, suburbanites, research work. ers, teachers, and others who are interested in agriculture or related subjects. Titles of publications are listed and are classified by subject matter, i.e., agricultural economics, agricultural engineering, animal science, etc. The book also contains a list of the publications in alphabetical order.

Based upon the official's selection from this list, a number of questions are asked which aid in determining the eligibility of the community for Federally funded programs. Once these questions have been answered the computer prints out by program name all of the relevant programs for which the community meets the basic eligibility criteria and which have an appropriation or continuing resolution for the current fiscal year. All program titles and number identifications are keyed to the Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance, which is used for the initial screening of programs. Throughout the country, this system will identify programs responsive to the development needs of rural communities. It will enable leaders of the rural communities to employ a single source of specifically applicable information concerning needed Federally funded programs for their communities, rather than doing research to find which programs are available to them. Information supporting this system is obtained directly from the program manager for each program contained in the system.

S00200-005
Agricultural Statistics, 1974. Melvin L. Koehn, and
others. 1974. 619 pp.
Budget Function/Subfunction: Agricultural research and
services (352).
Public Availability: GPO, Stock No. 0100-03335, $6.
Agency Contact: H. Nelson Fitton, Director, Publications
Division. 447-6623.

This report is published each year as a reference book on agricultural production, supplies, consumption, facilities, costs, and returns. The tables of annual data cover a wide variety of facts in forms most suited to common use. Most of the data is compiled by the Department of Agriculture (USDA), but a few tables are prepared by other Government agencies. Historical series are generally restricted to data beginning 1959 or later. Some series carry a reference in the source note to the 1972 Agricultural Statistics, where comparable data for earlier years may be found (1929 for principal crops, 1930 for livestock, 1944 for fruits and vegetables). United States foreign agricultural trade statistics include Government as well as non-Government shipments of merchandise from the United States and Territories to foreign countries. Statistics in many tables represent actual counts of the items covered, as in foreign trade, and Government programs. A large number of other tables contain data that are estimates made by the USDA. Estimates for crops, livestock, and poultry are prepared mainly to give timely current state and national totals and averages. These data are obtained by sample surveys of farmers and people who do business with farmers.

S00202-002
Guide to Federal Programs for Rural Development.
Fourth Edition. John A. Baker. Rural Development
Service, USDA. March 1975. 262 pp. + appendices.
Budget Function/Subfunction: Area and regional develop-
ment (452).
Public Availability: On request to the Rural Development
Service.
Agency Contact: James Madison, Information Officer,
Rural Development Service. 447.6557.

This reference handbook organizes and summarizes all available Federal assistance for rural development. The guide was designed for local leaders in rural communities to stimulate economic growth while main. taining the unique character and style of town and country living. Information is covered in five major categories: Jobs, Business, Industries; Community Facilities; Community Functions and Services; Housing and Planning; and Coordination. Categories are presented in chapters, each devoted to a specific rural community improvement function for which related or matching Federal assistance programs exist, and includes the government wide approach to the problem. This brings different department and agency resources all under one chapter heading. All programs with similar objectives are listed in juxtaposition regardless of organization at the Federal level. Individual programs are in summary form and alphabetically arranged under chapter headings. Cross references are used to avoid repetition. Appendices are also included.

S00202-001 Federal Assistance Programs Retrieval System (FAPRS). Budget Function/Subfunction: Area and regional development (452). Agency Contact: Paul Kugler, Director, Plans and Programs Staff, Rural Development Service. 447.2578.

This system provides information to local community leaders on rural development programs for which their communities meet the basic eligibility criteria. Under the FAPRS program a local public official can contact an agricultural service center and receive information on a specific project requiring Federal assistance for which his community is eligible. It is also planned to make the system available to local multicounty regional commissions operating in rural areas on a cost-sharing basis. The system works in the following manner: A local public official will request information on the availability of Federal financial assistance for a community project. The official selects a single choice from a list of community needs, such as community facilities or business and industry. Based upon this initial selection, a more narrowed listing of programs will be offered for selection.

S00203-001
Rural Electrification and Telephone Data Files.
Budget Function/Subfunction: Area and regional develop-
ment (452).
Agency Contact: Marvin T. Hearst, Management Services
Division, Rural Electrification Administration. 447-4472.

The Loan Accounting System reflects the indebtedness of REA electric distribution, power supply, and telephone borrowers to the Rural Electrification Administration and the Rural Telephone Bank. Financial and statistical information about the operations of REA and its electric and telephone borrowers is collected annually. Data are obtained directly from required operating reports submitted to REA by its borrowers. The system's

« iepriekšējāTurpināt »