Political Science: Or, The State Theoretically and Practically Considered, 1. sējums

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Scribner, Armstrong, 1877 - 1211 lappuses
 

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245. lappuse - The only part of the conduct of any one, for which he is amenable to society, is that which concerns others. In the part which merely concerns himself, his independence is, of right, absolute. Over himself, over his own body and mind, the individual is sovereign.
407. lappuse - The Tenure of Kings and Magistrates PROVING THAT IT IS LAWFUL, AND HATH BEEN HELD SO THROUGH ALL AGES, FOR ANY WHO HAVE THE POWER TO CALL TO ACCOUNT A TYRANT, OR WICKED KING, AND AFTER DUE CONVICTION TO DEPOSE AND PUT HIM TO DEATH, IF THE ORDINARY MAGISTRATE HAVE NEGLECTED OR DENIED TO DO IT.
250. lappuse - But with regard to the merely contingent or, as it may be called, constructive injury which a person causes to society, by conduct which neither violates any specific duty to the public, nor occasions perceptible hurt to any assignable individual except himself ; the inconvenience is one which society can afford to bear, for the sake of the greater good of human freedom.
334. lappuse - ... for he is the minister of God to thee for good. But if thou do that which is evil, be afraid ; for he beareth not the sword in vain. For he is a minister of God, a revenger to execute wrath upon him that doeth evil.
163. lappuse - Law in general is human reason, inasmuch as it governs all the inhabitants of the earth ; the political and civil laws of each nation ought to be only the particular cases in which human reason is applied.
408. lappuse - It follows, lastly, that since the king or magistrate holds his authority of the people, both originally and naturally for their good in the first place, and not his own, then may the people, as oft as they shall judge it for the best, either choose him or reject him, retain him or depose him, though no tyrant, merely by the liberty and right of freeborn men to be governed as seems to them best.
328. lappuse - Defile not ye yourselves in any of these things: for in all these the nations are defiled which I cast out before you, and the land is defiled: therefore I do visit the iniquity thereof upon it, and the land itself vomiteth out her inhabitants.
251. lappuse - In the first place, it must by no means be supposed, because damage, or probability of damage, to the interests of others can alone justify the interference of society, that therefore it always does justify such interference. In many cases an individual, in pursuing a legitimate object, necessarily and therefore legitimately causes pain or loss to others, or intercepts a good which they had a reasonable hope of obtaining.
245. lappuse - Despotism is a legitimate mode of government in dealing with barbarians, provided the end be their improvement, and the means justified by actually effecting that end. Liberty, as a principle, has no application to any state of things anterior to the time when mankind have become capable of being improved by free and equal discussion.
250. lappuse - ... the power to issue commands and enforce obedience in the personal concerns of individuals, in which, on all principles of justice and policy, the decision ought .to rest with those who are to abide the consequences.

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