Lapas attēli
PDF
ePub

§ 94a. Inspection of dairy products for export.-Sections 71-94 of this title shall be deemed to include dairy products intended for exportation to any foreign country, and the Secretary of Agriculture may apply, under rules and regulations to be prescribed by him, the provisions of said sections for inspection and certification appropriate for ascertaining the purity and quality of such products, and may cause the same to be so marked, stamped, or labeled as to secure their identity and make known in the markets of foreign countries to which they may be sent from the United States their purity, quality, and grade and all the provisions of said sections relating to live cattle and products thereof for export shall apply to dairy products so inspected and certified. (May 23, 1908, ch. 192, 35 Stat. 254.)

§ 95. Appropriation for expenses of inspection.-Annual appropriations of the sum of $3,000,000 from the general fund of the Treasury are authorized for the expenses of the inspection of cattle, sheep, swine, and goats and the meat and meat food products thereof which enter into interstate or foreign commerce and for all expenses necessary to carry into effect the provisions of sections 71-96 of this title, including rent and the employment of labor in Washington and elsewhere, for each year, and in addition there is authorized to be appropriated such other sums as may be necessary in the enforcement of the meat inspection laws (sections 71-96 of this title.) (June 30, 1906, ch. 3913, 34 Stat. 679; June 26, 1934, ch. 756, § 2, 48 Stat. 1225.)

§ 96. Marking horse meat transported in interstate commerce. No person, firm, or corporation or officer, agent, or employee thereof shall transport or offer for transportation, and no carrier of interstate or foreign commerce shall transport or receive for transporation from one State or Territory or the District of Columbia to any other State or Territory or the District of Columbia or to any place under the jurisdiction of the United States or to any foreign country, any equine meat or food products thereof unless plainly and conspicuously labeled, marked, branded or tagged "Horse meat" or "Horse-meat Product”, as the case may be, under such rules and regulations as may be prescribed by the Secretary of Agriculture. All the penalties, terms and provisions in sections 71-94 of this title, except the exemption therein applying to animals slaughtered by any farmer on a farm to retail butchers and retail dealers in meat food products supplying their customers, shall be applicable to horses, their carcasses, parts of carcasses, and meat food products thereof, and the establishments and other places where such animals are slaughtered or the meat or meat food products thereof are prepared or packed for the interstate or foreign commerce, and to all persons, firms, corporations and officers, agents and employees thereof who slaughter such animals or prepare or handle such meat or meat food products for interstate or foreign commerce. July 24, 1919, ch. 26, 41 Stat. 241.)

IMPORTATION OF CATTLE AND QUARANTINE § 101. Suspension of importation of all animals.—Whenever, in the opinion of the President, it shall be necessary for the protection of animals in the United States against infectious or contagious diseases, he may, by proclamation, suspend the importation of all or any class of animals for a limited time, and may change, modify, revoke, or renew such proclamation, as the public good may require; and during the time of such suspension the importation of any such animals shall be unlawful. (Aug. 30, 1890, ch. 839, § 9, 26 Stat. 416.)

§ 102, Quarantine of imported animals.—The Secretary of Agriculture is authorized, at the expense of the owner, to place and retain in quarantine all neat cattle, sheep, and other ruminants, and all swine, imported into the United States, at such ports as he may designate for such purpose, and under such conditions as he may by regulation prescribe, respectively, for the several classes of animals above described. For this purpose he may have and maintain possession of all lands, building, animals, tools, fixtures, and appurtenances in use on August 3, 1890, for the quarantine of neat cattle, and purchase, construct, or rent as may be necessary, and he may appoint veterinary surgeons, inspectors, officers, and employees by him deemed necessary to maintain such quarantine, and provide for the execution of the other provisions of sections 101-105 of this title. (Aug. 30, 1890, ch. 839, § 7, 26 Stat. 416.)

8 103. Importation, except at quarantine ports, prohibited; slaughter of infected animals; appraisal; payment. The importation of all animals described in sections 100-105 of this title into any port in the United States, except such as may be designated by the Secretary of Agriculture, with the approval of the Secretary of the Treasury, as quarantine stations, is prohibited. The Secretary of Agriculture may cause to be slaughtered such of the animals named in said sections as may be, under regulations prescribed by him, adjudged to be infected with any contagious disease, or to have been exposed to infection so as to be dangerous to other animals. The value of animals so slaughtered as being so exposed to infection but not infected may be ascertained by agreement of the Secretary of Agriculture and the owners thereof if practicable; otherwise, by the appraisal by. two persons familiar with the character and value of such property, to be appointed by the Secretary of Agriculture, whose decision, if they agree, shall be final; otherwise, the Secretary of Agriculture shall decide between them, and his decision shall be final. The amount of the value thus ascertained shall be paid to the owner thereof out of money in the Treasury appropriated for the use of the Bureau of Animal Industry; but no payment shall be made for any animal imported in violation of the provisions of the sections hereinbefore enumerated. If any animals subject to quarantine according to the provisions of said sections are brought into any port of the United States where no quarantine station is established, the collector of such port shall require the same to be conveyed, by the vessel on which they are imported or are found, to the nearest quarantine station at the expense of the owner. (Aug. 30, 1890, ch. 839, § 8, 26 Stat. 416.)

8 104. Importation of diseased animals prohibited.—The importation of cattle, sheep, and other ruminants, and swine, which are diseased or infected with any disease, or which shall have been exposed to such infection within sixty days next before their exportation, is prohibited: Provided, That the Secretary of Agriculture within his discretion and under such regulations as he may prescribe, is authorized to permit the admission from Mexico into the State of Texas of cattle which have been infested with or exposed to ticks upon being freed therefrom. Any person who shall knowingly violate the foregoing provision shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor and shall, on conviction, be punished by a fine not exceeding $5,000, or by imprisonment not exceeding three years, and any vessel or vehicle used in such unlawful importation within the knowledge of the master or owner of such vessel or vehicle that such importation is diseased or has been exposed to infection as herein described, shall be forfeited to the United States. (Aug. 30, 1890, ch. 839, § 6, 26 Stat. 416; June 28, 1926, ch. 700, § 2, 44 Stat. 775; Feb. 28, 1931, ch. 348, 46 Stat. 1460.)

$ 105. Inspection of animals imported or intended for export.The Secretary of Agriculture shall cause careful inspection to be made by a suitable officer of all imported animals described in sections 101-104 of this title, to ascertain whether such animals are infected with contagious diseases or have been exposed to infection so as to be dangerous to other animals, which shall then either be placed in quarantine or dealt with according to the regulations of the Secretary of Agriculture. All food, litter, manure, clothing, utensils, and other appliances that have been so related to such animals on board ship as to be judged liable to convey infection shall be dealt with according to the regulations of the Secretary of Agriculture. The Secretary of Agriculture may cause inspection to be made of all animals described in such sections intended for exportation, and provide for the disinfection of all vessels engaged in the transportation thereof, and of all barges or other vessels used in the conveyance of such animals intended for export to the ocean steamer or other vessels, and of all attendants and their clothing, and of all headropes and other appliances used in such exportation, by such orders and regulations as he may prescribe; and if, upon such inspection, any such animals shall be adjudged, under the regulations of the Secretary of Agriculture, to be infected or to have been exposed to infection so as to be dangerous to other animals, they shall not be allowed to be placed upon any vessel for exportation; the expense of all the inspection and disinfection provided for in this section to be borne by the owners of the vessels on which such animals are exported. (Aug. 30, 1890, ch. 839, § 10, 26 Stat. 417.)

PREVENTION OF INTRODUCTION AND SPREAD OF CONTAGION

§ 111. Regulations to prevent contagious diseases.—The Secretary of Agriculture shall have authority to make such regulations and take such measures as he may deem proper to prevent the introduction or dissemination of the contagion of any contagious, infectious, or communicable disease of animals and/or live poultry from a foreign country into the United States or from one State or Territory of the United States or the District of Columbia to another, and to seize, quarantine, and dispose of any hay, straw, forage, or similar material, or any meats, hides, or other animal products coming from an infected foreign country to the United States, or from one State or Territory or the District of Columbia in transit to another State or Territory or the District of Columbia whenever in his judgment such action is advisable in order to guard against the introduction or spread of such contagion. (Feb. 2, 1903, ch. 349, § 2, 32 Stat. 792; Feb. 7, 1928, ch. 30, 45 Stat. 59.)

§ 112. Investigations as to pleuropneumonia, and other diseases; regulations. In order to promote the exportation of livestock and/or live poultry from the United States the Secretary of Agriculture shall make special investigation as to the existence of pleuropneumonia, or any contagious, infectious, or communicable disease, along the dividing lines between the United States and foreign countries, and along the lines of transportation from all parts of the United States to ports from which livestock and/or live poultry are exported, and shall, from time to time, establish such regulations concerning the exportation and transportation of livestock and/or live poultry as the results of said investigations may require. (May 29, 1884, ch. 60, § 4, 23 Stat. 32; Feb. 2, 1903, ch. 349, § 1, 32 Stat. 791; Feb. 7, 1928, ch. 30, 45 Stat. 59.)

§ 113. Measures to prevent exportation of diseased livestock and live poultry. In order to prevent the exportation from any port of the United States to any port in a foreign country of livestock and/or live poultry affected with any contagious, infectious, or communicable disease, and especially pleuropneumonia, the Secretary of Agriculture is authorized to take such steps and adopt such measures, not inconsistent with the provisions of sections 111-119 of this title, as he may deem necessary. (May 29, 1884, ch. 60, § 5, 23 Stat. 32; Feb. 2, 1903, ch. 349, § 1, 32 Stat. 791; Feb. 7, 1928, ch. 30, 45 Stat. 59.)

§ 114. Regulations for suppression of diseases; cooperd con un States and Territories. It shall be the duty of the Secretary of Agriculture to prepare such rules and regulations as he may dtem necessary for the speedy and effectual suppression and extirpation of pleuropneumonia and other dangerous, contagious, infectious, and communicable diseases, and to certify such rules and regulations to the executive authority of each State and Territory, and invite said authorities to cooperate in the execution and enforcement of the provisions of sections 111-115, 117-119, and 130 of this title. Whenever the plans and methods of the Secretary of Agriculture shall be accepted by any State or Territory in which pleuropneumonio or other contagious, infectious, or communicable disease is declared to exist, or such State or Territory shall have adopted plans and methods for the suppression and extirpation of said diseases, and such plans and methods shall be accepted by the Secretary of Agriculture, and whenever the governor of a State or other properly constituted authorities signify their readiness to cooperate for the extinction of any contagious, infectious, or communicable disease in conformity with the provisions of the sections hereinbefore enumerated, the Secretary of Agriculture is authorized to expend so much of the money appropriated for carrying out the provisions of said sections as may be necessary in such investigations, and in such disinfection and quarantine measures as may be necessary to prevent the spread of the disease from one State or Territory into another. (May 29, 1884, ch. 60, § 3, 23 Stat. 32; Feb. 7, 1928, ch. 30, 45 Stat. 59.)

§ 114a. Control and eradication of diseases; cooperation of States and farmers' associations; purchase and destruction of diseased animals; definition of State.—The Secretary of Agriculture, either independently or in cooperation with States or political subdivisions thereof, farmers' associations, and similar organizations, and individuals, is authorized to control and eradicate tuberculosis and paratuberculosis of animals, avian tuberculosis, Bang's disease of cattle, southern cattle ticks, hog cholera and related swine diseases, scabies in sheep and cattle, dourine in horses, and contagious or infectious diseases of animals (such as foot-and-mouth disease, rinder-pest, and contagious pleuropneumonia) which in the opinion of the Secretary constitute an emergency and threaten the livestock industry of the country, including the purchase and destruction of diseased or exposed animals (including poultry), or the destruction of such animals and the payment of indemnities therefor, in accordance with such regulations as the Secretary may prescribe. As used in this section, the term “State" includes the District of Columbia and the Territories and possessions of the United States. (May 29, 1884, ch. 60, § 11, as added Sept. 21, 1944, ch. 412, title I, § 101 (a), 58 Stat. 734.)

CODIFICATION DifThis section was enacted by the Department of Agriculture Organic Act of 1944,

APPROPRIATIONS Section 101 (g) of act Sept. 21, 1944, cited to text, provided that Congress may appropriate such funds as are necessary to accomplish the purpose of

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

$ 115. Transportation of diseased livestock and live poultry pivnibited; splenetic fever.—No railroad company within the United States, or the owners or masters of any steam or sailing or other vessel or boat, shall receive for transportation or transport from one State or Territory to another, or from any State into the District of Columbia, or from the District into any State, any livestock and/or live poultry affected with any contagious, infectious, or communicable disease, and especially the disease known as pleuropneumonia; nor shall any person, company, or corporation deliver for such transportation to any railroad company, or master or owner of any boat or vessel, any livestock and/or live poultry, knowing them to be affected with any contagious, infectious, or communicable disease; nor shall any person, company, or corporation drive on foot, or transport in private conveyance from one State or Territory to another, or from any State into the District of Columbia, or from the District into any State, any livestock and/or live poultry, knowing them

« iepriekšējāTurpināt »