For a New Liberty: The Libertarian Manifesto

Pirmais vāks
Ludwig von Mises Institute, 1978 - 338 lappuses

No grāmatas satura

Lietotāju komentāri - Rakstīt atsauksmi

Lietotāja vērtējumi

5 zvaigznes
6
4 zvaigznes
1
3 zvaigznes
1
2 zvaigznes
0
1 zvaigzne
0

LibraryThing Review

Lietotāja recenzija  - JohnRolstead - LibraryThing

This book lays out the foundation for a Libertarian ideal. It goes step by step, showing how a society would function under libertarian principles. What may be the most important point is how to ... Lasīt pilnu pārskatu

LibraryThing Review

Lietotāja recenzija  - steshaw - LibraryThing

How a society organised without rulers might work. i.e. political anarchy (not to be confused with violence, chaos and disorder). Lasīt pilnu pārskatu

Atlasītās lappuses

Citi izdevumi - Skatīt visu

Bieži izmantoti vārdi un frāzes

Populāri fragmenti

35. lappuse - Though the earth and all inferior creatures be common to all men, yet every man has a property in his own person. This nobody has any right to but himself. The labour of his body, and the work of his hands, we may say, are properly his.
37. lappuse - Thus, the grass my horse has bit, the turfs my servant has cut, and the ore I have digged in any place, where I have a right to them in common with others, become my property without the assignation or consent of any body. The labour that was mine, removing them out of that common state they were in, hath fixed my property in them.
40. lappuse - As much land as a man tills, plants, improves, cultivates, and can use the product of, so much is his property.
148. lappuse - That the selectmen of every town in the several precincts and quarters where they dwell, shall have a vigilant eye over their brethren and neighbors, to see, first, that none of them shall suffer so much barbarism in any of their families, as not to endeavor to teach by themselves or others, their children and apprentices so much learning, as may enable them perfectly to read the English tongue, and knowledge of the capital laws, upon penalty of twenty shillings for each neglect therein...
37. lappuse - No body can deny but the nourishment is his. I ask then, when did they begin to be his? When he digested? Or when he eat?
37. lappuse - And amongst those who are counted the civilized part of mankind, who have made and multiplied positive laws to determine property, this original law of nature, for the beginning of property, in what was before common, still takes place...
68. lappuse - ... one of its primary functions is to regiment men by force, to make them as much alike as possible and as dependent upon one another as possible, to search out and combat originality among them. All it can see in an original idea is potential change, and hence an invasion of its prerogatives. The most dangerous man, to any government, is the man who is able to think things out for himself, without regard to the prevailing superstitions and taboos. Almost inevitably he comes to the conclusion that...
36. lappuse - For this labour being the unquestionable property of the labourer, no man but he can have a right to what that is once joined to, at least where there is enough, and as good left in common for others.
57. lappuse - ... they are inserted with the means of enforcing their observance, will be sufficient to prevent the major and dominant party from abusing its powers. Being the party in possession of the government, they will, from the same constitution of man which makes government necessary to protect society, be in favor of the powers granted by the constitution, and opposed to the restrictions intended to limit them.
147. lappuse - For our rulers are certainly bound to maintain the spiritual and secular offices and callings so that there may always be preachers, jurists, pastors, scribes, physicians, schoolmasters, and the like; for these cannot be dispensed with.

Bibliogrāfiskā informācija