Blood of the Isles

Pirmais vāks
W F Howes, 2007 - 367 lappuses
Takes us on a journey around the family tree of Britain and Ireland. This book looks at a research programme, set out to test the DNA of over 10,000 volunteers, with the specific aim of answering this question: What is our modern genetic make-up? The evidence revealed often very different stories to the conventional accounts coming from history. Bryan Sykes, the world's first genetic archaeologist, takes us on a journey around the family tree of Britain and Ireland, to reveal how our tribal history still colours the country today. In 54BC, Julius Caesar launched the first Roman invasion of Britain. His was the first detailed account of the Celtic tribes that inhabited the Isles. But where had they come from and how long had they been there? When the Roman eventually left five hundred years later, they were succeeded by invasions of Anglo-Saxons, Vikings and Normans. Did these successive invasions obliterate the genetic legacy of the Celts, or have very little effect? After two decades tracing the genetic origins of people from all over the world, Bryan Sykes has now turned the spotlight on his own back yard. In a major research programme, the first of its kind, he and his team at Oxford University set out to test the DNA of over 10,000 volunteers from across Britain and Ireland with the specific aim of answering this very question: what is our modern genetic make-up and what does it tell us of our tribal past? Where are today's Celtic genes? Did Vikings only rape and pillage, or settle with their families?

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Par autoru (2007)

Bryan Sykes is professor of genetics at the Institute of Molecular Medicine at Oxford University & was the editor of "The Human Inheritance: Genes, Language, & Evolution".

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