Continental Shelf Limits: The Scientific and Legal Interface

Pirmais vāks
Peter J. Cook, Chris M. Carleton
Oxford University Press, 2000. gada 19. okt. - 384 lappuses
Article 76 of the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea lays down the rules and regulations governing claims to a continental shelf beyond 200 nautical miles for the 130 coastal States and entities that have ratified or acceded to it. This book is designed to help those coastal States implement the provisions of Article 76, covering the technical issues involved and explaining the interface between the legal concepts contained within the article. It covers all aspects that will have to be considered by a coastal State if it wishes to make a claim under the Convention, including the characteristics of continental margins, distance determination, bathymetric data collection. geological and geophysical techniques, and boundary conditions.
 

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Atlasītās lappuses

Saturs

Introduction
3
The United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea
8
The Major Features of the Convention
9
Institutions Created by the Convention
14
Monitoring Future Developments
15
References
16
Legal Aspects of the Continental Shelf
17
Overview of Article 76 Provisions
18
WideAngle Reflection
181
Determination of Sediment Thickness
186
Planning a Seismic Survey to Determine Sediment Thickness
188
Continental Margins as Viewed from Seismic Profiles
189
References
192
Gravity and Magnetic Methods
194
Data Acquisition and Presentation
195
Characteristics of Crustal Types and the ContinentalOceanic Boundary
204

Summary of Procedure for a Coastal State to Follow in Determining the Outer Limits of Its Continental Shelf
24
Characteristics of Continental Margins
25
Continental Margin Morphology and Form
29
Geology of Continental Margins
32
Continental Margin Types and the Application of Article 76
54
Conclusion
59
Resources of the Continental Margin and International Law
64
Access of Countries to the Continental Margin
66
States Responsibilities Arising from Claims to the Continental Margin
72
States Opportunities Arising from Claims to the Continental Margin
75
The Challenges for States Claiming the Continental Margin
81
References
82
Methodology
85
Geodetic Techniques
87
National and International Datums
93
Geodetic Positioning
96
Theory of Errors
97
Analysis of Survey Networks
99
Distance Determination
100
References
104
Historical Methods of Positioning at Sea
105
Astronomic Observations
106
Dead Reckoning Measurements of Speed and Direction
107
An Introduction to Satellite Positioning Systems
108
Horizontal Datums
110
Satellite Positioning Methods
111
Positioning by GPS
114
GPS Equipment
119
The Future of GPS
120
References
123
Historical Methods of Depth Measurement
124
Mechanical Methods
125
The SingleBeam Echo Sounder
129
Summary
138
PresentDay Methods of Depth Measurement
139
Interferometric Bathymetry
142
Differential Phase Methods
143
MultipleNarrowBeam Methods
144
Comparative Advantages
146
The Effect of Instrument Horizontal and Vertical Positioning
148
Resulting Seabed Bathymetric Information Content
149
Application to the Definition of the 2500m Contour
153
The Potential and Limitations of Bathymetry Derived from Sea Surface Altimetry
156
Summary
157
References
158
Interpretation of Bathymetry
160
Their Use in Delimitation
162
Producing a Bathymetry Map
164
Contouring
174
References
176
Seismic Reflection and Refraction Methods
177
References
213
Geological Techniques
214
Sampling
216
Corers
217
Powered Corers
219
Coring Using Drillships
220
Underwater Vehicles
227
References
229
Data Sources Management and Presentation
230
Bathymetry
231
Additional Data and Their Uses
232
Sources of Sediment Thickness Data
239
European Geosclence Data
241
The World Data Center System
246
WebBased Information
247
References
249
Establishing the Case
251
Initial Assessment
253
No Extended Continental Shelf
256
Delineating the Foot of the Slope
258
Outermost Limits
261
Determining the Outer Limit of the Continental Shelf
262
Collecting New Information
264
References
266
The Practical Realization of the Continental Shelf Limit
268
Foot of the Slope Plus 60 M
270
Limits Based on Foot of the Slope and Sediment Thickness
274
Outermost Limits
278
Conclusion
281
Other Issues
283
Ridge Issues
285
Definitions
286
Types of Ridges
288
Applying the Ridge Provisions of Article 76
298
Article 766
300
Conclusions
305
References
306
Deep Sea Fan Issues
308
The Scientific and Legal Interface
310
Delimitation Issues
312
Boundaries beyond 200 M
313
References
318
Annexes
319
Glossary of Technical Terms
321
Key Provisions of UNCLOS Relating to the Continental Shelf
331
Annex IICommission on the Limits of the Continental Shelf
342
Annex II to the Final Act Statement of Understanding Concerning a Specific Method to Be Used in Establishing the Outer Edge of the Continental M...
344
1958 Geneva Convention on the Continental Shelf
345
Acronyms
348
Index
351
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