Horace and Thackeray

Pirmais vāks
University of Wisconsin--Madison, 1897 - 148 lappuses

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Populāri fragmenti

23. lappuse - Ah! Vanitas Vanitatum! which of us is happy in this world ? Which of us has his desire ? or having it, is satisfied ? — come, children, let us shut up the box and the puppets, for our play is played out.
55. lappuse - And, as we bring our characters forward, I will ask leave, as a man and a brother, not only to introduce them, but occasionally to step down from the platform, and talk about them : if they are good and kindly, to love them and shake them by the hand : if they are silly, to laugh at them confidentially in the reader's sleeve : if they are wicked and heartless, to abuse them in the strongest terms which politeness admits of.
51. lappuse - Oh, be humble, my brother, in your prosperity ! Be gentle with those who are less lucky, if not more deserving. Think, what right have you to be scornful, whose virtue is a deficiency of temptation, whose success may be a chance, whose rank may be an ancestor's accident, whose prosperity is very likely a satire.
24. lappuse - Thus, oh friendly readers, we see how every man in the world has his own private griefs and business, by which he is more cast down or occupied than by the affairs or sorrows of any other person. While Mrs. Pendennis is disquieting herself about losing her son, and that anxious hold she has had of him...
56. lappuse - ... are a Snob ; you, who forget your own friends, meanly to follow after those of a higher degree, are a Snob ; you, who are ashamed of your poverty, and blush for your calling, are a Snob; as are you who boast of your pedigree, or are proud of your wealth. To laugh at such is Mr. Punch's business. May he laugh honestly, hit no foul blow, and tell the truth when at his very broadest grin — never forgetting that if Fun is good, Truth is still better, and Love best of all.
56. lappuse - You, who despise your neighbor, are a Snob ; you, who forget your own friends, meanly to follow after those of a higher degree, are a Snob ; you, who are ashamed of your poverty, and blush for your calling, are a Snob j as are you who boast of your pedigree, or are proud of your wealth.
32. lappuse - The doctor will come up to us too for the last time there, my friend in motley. The nurse will look in at the curtains, and you take no notice — and then she will fling open the windows for a little, and let in the air. Then they will pull down all the front blinds of the house and live in the back rooms — then they will send for the lawyer and other men in black, &c.
61. lappuse - No more firing was heard at Brussels — the pursuit rolled miles away. Darkness came down on the field and city ; and Amelia was praying for George, who was lying on his face, dead, with a bullet through his heart.
68. lappuse - Naples museum, whereon a boy of Herculaneum, eighteen hundred years ago, had scratched with a nail the figure of a soldier. I could fancy the child turning round and smiling on me after having done his etching. Which of us that is thirty years old has not had his Pompeii ? Deep under ashes lies the Life of Youth, — the careless Sport, the Pleasure and Passion, the darling Joy. You open an old letter-box and look at your own childish scrawls, or your mother's letters to you when you were at school...
33. lappuse - ... prosperous and famous, or poor and disappointed? To have, and to be forced to yield; or to sink out of life, having played and lost the game ? That must be a- strange feeling, when a day of our life comes and we say, ' To-morrow, success or failure won't matter much; and the sun will rise, and all the myriads of mankind go to their work or their pleasure as usual, but I shall be out of the turmoil.

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