Civil Liberties in America: A Reference Handbook

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ABC-CLIO, 2004 - 323 lappuses

A concise, authoritative guide to civil liberties issues in American society, from freedom of speech and religious liberty to due process, equal protection, and privacy.


Written for a general audience, this work clearly defines civil liberties and explains their legal basis in the Bill of Rights, state constitutions, legal statutes, and administrative regulations. It reviews the subject's history from 1917 to the present, and covers the full range of civil liberties issues: the First Amendment, due process, equal protection, and privacy.

In addition to extensive material on past controversies such as the Scopes trial and the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II, the book discusses important contemporary issues such as censorship on the Internet and drug testing. The coverage also examines conflicting civil liberties issues such as hate speech, which pits one person's freedom of expression against another's right to equal protection. The book contains extensive bibliographic references to books and articles and a long list of website links to organizations active on all sides of today's civil liberties controversies.


20 photos, a list of further resources (print and electronic), and a Chronology

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Atlasītās lappuses

Saturs

1 Introduction
1
2 Issues and Controversies
27
3 Chronology
97
4 Key People and Concepts
125
5 Documents
147
6 Organizations
205
7 Print and Nonprint Resources
231
Table of Cases
295
Index
299
About the Author
324
Autortiesības

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Populāri fragmenti

7. lappuse - The very purpose of a Bill of Rights was to withdraw certain subjects from the vicissitudes of political controversy, to place them beyond the reach of majorities and officials and to establish them as legal principles to be applied by the courts.
28. lappuse - The most stringent protection of free speech would not protect a man in falsely shouting fire in a theatre and causing a panic.
2. lappuse - If there is any fixed star in our constitutional constellation, it is that no official, high or petty, can prescribe what shall be orthodox in politics, nationalism, religion, or other matters of opinion or force citizens to confess by word or act their faith therein.
151. lappuse - That the freedom of speech and debates or proceedings in Parliament ought not to be impeached or questioned in any court or place out of Parliament; 10.
185. lappuse - The Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation. AMENDMENT XXVII [Proposed] * Section 1. Equality of rights under the law shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex. Section 2. The Congress shall have the power to enforce, by appropriate legislation, the provisions of this article. Section 3. This amendment shall take effect two years after the date of ratification.
29. lappuse - Thus we consider this case against the background of a profound national commitment to the principle that debate on public issues should be uninhibited, robust, and wide-open, and that it may well include vehement, caustic, and sometimes unpleasantly sharp attacks on government and public officials.
162. lappuse - For present purposes we may and do assume that freedom of speech and of the press — which are protected by the First Amendment from abridgment by Congress — are among the fundamental personal rights and "liberties" protected by the due process clause of the Fourteenth Amendment from impairment by the States.
163. lappuse - States, to print, publish, edit, issue, circulate, sell, distribute, or publicly display any written or printed matter advocating, advising, or teaching the duty, necessity, desirability, or propriety of overthrowing or destroying any government in the United States by force or violence...
165. lappuse - The standard for the refusal of employment or the removal from employment in an executive department or agency on grounds relating to loyalty shall be that, on all the evidence, reasonable grounds exist for belief that the person involved is disloyal to the Government of the United States.
158. lappuse - In my opinion, the judgment this day rendered will, in time, prove to be quite as pernicious as the decision made by this tribunal in the Dred Scott case.

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Par autoru (2004)

Samuel Walker is professor of criminal justice at the University of Nebraska Omaha, Omaha, NE.

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