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2s. per cwt.

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Beef, India, and extra qualities, in bond, per tierco

U. States, prime mess, old, in bond, per tierce
U. States, prime mess, in bond, per bbl. -
U. States, prime, inferior and old, in bond, per tierce
Canadian, prime mess, in bond, per tierce
Canadian, prime mess, in bond, per bbl.

Canadian, inferior and old, in bond, per bbl.
Pork, U. States, prime mess, in bond, per bbl.

U. States, primo, in bond, per bbl.
U. States, middles, in tierces, in bond, per 336 lbs.
Canadian, primo mess, in bond, per bbl.
Canadian, prime, in bond, per bbl.

Canadian, middles, in tierces, duty paid, per 336 lbs
Bacon, in dry salt, duty paid, per cwt.
Hams, dry, in bond, per cwt.
Lard, fine leaf, in kegs, duty paid, per cwt.

secondary quality, in bbls., duty paid, per cwt.

inferior, duty paid, per cwt. Batter, V. States, prime, duty paid, per cwt.

U. States, pot, duty paid per cwt. 'U. Staten, pearl, duty paid, per cwt.

Canadian, duty paid, per cwt.

grease, duty paid, per cwt. Cheese, prime quality, duty paid, per cwt.

ordinary, duty paid, per cwt.

inferior, duty paid, per cwt.
Ox tongues, in pickle, duty paid, per dozen
Tallow, duty paid, per cwt.
Ashes, Montreal, pot, duty paid, per cwt.

Montreal, pearl, duty paid, per cwt.

6d. per cwt.

1 60

& 1 80 1 2 0

2 1 4 0 2 6 0

a 2 10 0 U17 0 a 2 0 0

8s. per cwt.
3 16 0

ສ 4 0 0
2 10 0 2 14 0
2 40 2 60
6 10 0 5 16 0
None.

14s. per cwt.
1 80 2 0 0
2 2 0

a 2 60
1 16 0 a I 18 0

28. per cwt.
1 120 i 14 6 S

Ll per cwt.
4 2 0 4 30
1 16 0 1 18 0 1s. 8d. per cwt.
2 10 0 2 14 0
2 40 2 80

10s. 6d. per awt.
2 0 0

1 2 30 16 0

18 0 10s. per cwt. 2 0 0 8 2 10

36. 2d. per cwt. 1 30 1 3 6 1 60 1 3 0 1 3 6

None.

None.

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28. 6d. per cwt.

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Wheat.

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Beeswax, unbleached, duty paid, per cwt.
Flour, U. States, duty paid, per bbl.

U. States, in bond, per bbl.
Canadian, duty paid, per bbl.

Canadian, sour, duty paid, per bbl.
Wheat, U. States, duty paid, per 70 lbs.

Canadian, duty paid, per 70 lbs.
Peas, Canadian, duty paid, per 504 lbs.
Barley, Canadian, duty paid, per 60 lbs.
Indian corn, duty paid, per 480 lbs.
Oatmeal, Canadian, duty paid, per 240 lbs.
Flaxseed, duty paid, per hhd.
Cloverseed, duty paid, per cwt.
Linseed cake, duty paid, per ton
Rape cake, duty paid, per ton
Hemp, dew-rotted, duty paid, per ton
Lead, pig, duty paid, per ton -
Bones, mixed, duty paid, per ton
Lard oil, duty paid, per tun
Hides, wet salted, duty paid, per lb.

dry, duty paid, per lb.
Quercitron bark, Philadelphia, duty paid, per cwt.
Horns, buffalo, duty paid, per cwt.
Tar, duty paid, per bbl.
Turpentine, duty paid, per cwt.

7 0 0

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5 a
7 9

Average price of the six weeks, which regulates the duty
Duty during the present week
Duty on colonial produce

£ 8. d.
2 5 8
1 0 0

1 0

£ s. d. 1 1 9

6 0 2 0

14 11
4 0

d.
1 15 11

7 6

12 0.1

Five per cent. extra is charged on the amount of the above duties; provisions for export or ship stores pay no duty; hams and bacon in pickle pay duty as pork. The cwt. is 112 lbs.; the imperial gallon is 9 lbs.; the tun is 252 imperial gallons; the quarter is 8 bushels; the barrel of provisions is 200 lbs.; the tierce is 304 lbs. A shilling is equal to 24 cents,

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pieces should be marked upon the head. No part of the hog's head is allowed in any instance.

Beef - This is uniformly cut into eight-pound pieces, and cured in all particulars precisely like pork, except a larger proportion of saltpetre is used in packing. Beef is almost entirely packed in tierces. For export, tierces only should be used.

A tierce of prime India beef should contain 42 pieces, eight pounds each, and weigh not less than 336 pounds nett. It should be made from wellfed bullocks, and contain 32 pieces of loins, flanks, rumps, plates, buttocks, and briskets; 10 pieces, consisting of four chines, two mouse buttocks, two shells of rumps, two pieces cut up close to the neck, with bone taken outno shins, thigh bones, or neck. To be well salted, and capped with St. Ubes or other coarse salt.

A tierce of prime mess beef should contain 38 pieces of eight pounds, and weigh not less than 304 pounds nett. It should be made from prime fat cows, or heifers; twenty-eight pieces of prime from loins and chines, with one rib in each, flanks, rumps, plates, brisket, and buttocks; with 10 coarse pieces, consisting of two neck pieces, (not the scrag,) two thighs or buttock bones, with some meat to them, two shells of rumps two or even four chines, not cilt too close to the neck, and two shoulder pieces, with part of the blade bone in them, well salted, and capped with St. Ubes or other coarse salt.

The tierces, whether for beef or pork, must be made of well-seasoned oak, with eight wooden and three iron hoops on each end. No pains to be spared in preparing and putting up, as the neat and tasty appearance of the packages will insure a more ready sale than if put up in a slovenly manner.

It may be useful to yourself, or to your neighbors, to see the mode of cutting up the carcass of an ox in London. The provisions exported from that metropolis rule the trade in the West India islands and in other distant places abroad. It is very proper, therefore, that American packers should understand the English method.

The annexed cut will show the London mode:

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Fig.–Cutting up an ox in London.
Hind quarter.

Fore quarter.

1 Loin.
2 Rump.
3 Aitch, or adze bone.
4 Buttock.
5 Hock,
6* Thick flank.
7 Thin flank.

8 Fore rib.
9 Middle rib.
10 Chuck rib.
11 Brisket.
12 Leg of mutton piece.
13 Clod and sticking, and neck..

No. 14.—This, properly speaking, is the brisket, and is left out in the English cut. In a good ox, of the Durham breed, it is a great point, and it gives very choice pieces for packing India beef, as they are good meat, and perfectly free from bone.

The relative value of these different cuts of an ox may be stated at their current value, viz: when the rump, loins, and fore ribs, of a fine ox will fetch eight pence a pound, the thick flank, buttock, and middle rib, will fetch six pence; the aitch or adze bone, thin flank, chuck rib, brisket, and leg-of-mutton piece, five pence; the clod and sticking, and neck, three pence; and the legs and shins, two pence a pound. Such is the difference in value of the different cuts of an ox in the meat markets of London.

It is well to observe, that the greatest attention should be paid to the making brine or pickle, whether for beef or pork. Pure water should be used in its manufacture; for the sediment from that which is impure will settle down upon the meat, and give it a bad color and a slimy feel. Where river or rain water is used, (and soft water should always be preferred,) it would be exceedingly desirable to filter it through sand, or at least to strain it. A great deal of beef and pork is utterly unfit for exportation, by the use of unfiltered water in making the brine.

In packing provisions, the tierces, barrels, &c., should be made with great care and neatness. Clean, handsome ash staves are preferred, and of such other hard close-grained wood as will not stain the meat. Tierces should have four iron hoops, or three-one at the bilge and one at each chime. Barrels with an iron hoop at each chime. The fuller-hooped the barrel or tierce is, the better.

We noticed, recently, that the first year after the modification of the British tariff, up to 31st August, 1842, 3,367 barrels only of American beef were imported into Liverpool. The past year, up to 31st August, there

. were imported into the same place 9,812 barrels, and 10,789 tierces of beef. If we would only pack our beef neatly by the above directions, the importations in 1846 might double those of 1844; and a great increase likewise will be made in the importation of pork.

pieces should be marked upon the head. No part of the hog's head is allowed in any instance.

Beef.—This is uniformly cut into eight-pound pieces, and cured in all particulars precisely like pork, except a larger proportion of saltpetre is used in packing. Beef is almost entirely packed in tierces. For export, tierces only should be used.

A tierce of prime India beef should contain 42 pieces, eight pounds each, and weigh not less than 336 pounds nett. It should be made from wellfed bullocks, and contain 32 pieces of loins, flanks, rumps, plates, buttocks, and briskets; 10 pieces, consisting of four chines, two mouse buttocks, two shells of rumps, two pieces cut up close to the neck, with bone taken outno shins, thigh bones, or neck. To be well salted, and capped with St. Ubes or other coarse salt.

A tierce of prime mess beef should contain 38 pieces of eight. pounds, and weigh not less than 304 pounds nett. It should be made from prime fat cows, or heifers; twenty-eight pieces of prime from loins and chines, with one rib in each, flanks, rumps, plates, brisket, and buttocks; with 10 coarse pieces, consisting of two neck pieces, (not the scrag,) two thighs or buttock bones, with some meat to them, two shells of rumps two or even four chines, not cut too close to the neck, and two shoulder pieces, with part of the blade bone in them, well salted, and capped with St. Ubes or other coarse salt.

The tierces, whether for beef or pork, must be made of well-seasoned oak, with eight wooden and three iron hoops on each end. No pains to be spared in preparing and putting up, as the neat and tasty appearance of the packages will insure a more ready sale than if put up in a slovenly manner.

a It may be useful to yourself, or to your neighbors, to see the mode of cutting up the carcass of an ox in London. The provisions exported from that metropolis rule the trade in the West India islands and in other distant places abroad. It is very proper, therefore, that American packers should understand the English method.

The annexed cut will show the London mode:

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Fig.-Cutting up an ox in London,
Hind quarter.

Fore quarter.
i Loin.

8 Fore rib. 2 Rump.

9 Middle rib. 3 Aitch, or adze bone.

10 Chuck rib. 4 Buttock.

11 Brisket. 5 Hock,

12 Leg of mutton piece. 6* Thick flank.

13 Clod and sticking, and neck 7 Thin flank.

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