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List, by years and sessions of Congress, of naval vessels authorized by acts of Congress from

1883 to 1905, inclusire--Continued.

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The naval appropriation act of last year providedThat for the purpose of further increasing the naval establishment of the United States, the President is hereby authorized to have constructed by contract or in navy-yards as hereinafter provided

One first-class battle ship, carrying as heavy armor and as powerful armament as any known vessel of its class, to have the highest practicable speed and greatest practicable radius of action, and to cost, exclusive of armament and armor, not exceeding six million dollars: Provided, That before approving any plans or specifications for the construction of such battle ship the Secretary of the Navy shall afford, by advertisement or otherwise, in his discretion, a reasonable opportunity to any competent constructor who may desire so to do, to submit plans and specifications for his consideration, for which said plans, should the same be used by the Department and be not submitted by or on behalf of a successful bidder for the contract

, such compensation shall be paid as the Secretary of the Navy shall deem just and equitable out of the amount herein appropriated under the head “Contingent, Navy": Provided, That before any proposals for said battle ship shall be issued or any bids received and accepted the Secretary of the Navy shall report to Congress at its next session full details covering the type of such battle ship and the specifications for the same, including its displacement, draft, and dimensions, and the kind and extent for of armor and armament therefor.

The Secretary of the Navy bas complied with this provision, as shown by House Document No. 295, in his report to the Speaker of the House of Representatives.

The committee recommend this year the following:

That, for the purpose of further increasing the naval establishment of the United States, the President is hereby authorized to have constructed, by contract or in navy-yards, as hereinafter provided, one first-class battle ship similar in all essential characteristics, and additional to, the battle ship authorized by the act making appropriations for the naval service for the fiscal year ending June thirtieth, nineteen hundred and seven, plans and specifications for which last-named vessel have already been prepared and submitted by the Secretary of the Navy for the information of Congress, as required by the provisions of the aforesaid act.

Two torpedo-boat destroyers, to have the highest practicable speed, and to cost exclusive of armor and armament not to exceed eight hundred and fifty thousand dollars each.

The Committee further recommend the following provision: That the provision in the naval appropriation act approved June twenty-ninth, nineteen hundred and six, authorizing the Secretary of the Navy to contract for submarine boats after certain tests to be completed by March twenty-ninth, nineteen hundred and seven, is hereby amended, in accordance with the recommendation of the Secretary of the Navy, so as to extend the test period until May twenty-ninth, nineteen hundred and seven; and the limit of cost provided for in the authorization aforesaid is hereby increased to three million dollars, and the sum of one million dollars, which includes the half million dollars heretofore appropriated, is hereby appropriated, and to remain available until expended.

FOREIGN NAVAL PROGRAMMES.

NAVY DEPARTMENT,

Washington, December 20, 1906. Sir: I have the honor to transmit herewith some information concerning the shipbuilding programmes of foreign navies compiled at your request by the Office of Naval Intelligence. Very respectfully,

V. H. METCALF, Secretary. Hon. GEORGE EDMUND Foss, Chairman of the Committee on Naval Affairs,

House of Representatives.

OFFICE OF NAVAL INTELLIGENCE,

December 20, 1906. This memorandum of information is in response to a request by the chairman of the Committee on Naval Affairs, House of Representatives, dated December 18, 1906.

Contents: Compilations showing for the five principal naval powers the building programmes, together with tables showing the vessels completed during the past year and vessels building and to be built.

R. P. RODGERS, Captain, U. S. Navy, Chief Intelligence Officer.

OFFICE OF NAVAL INTELLIGENCE,

January 1, 1907.

NAVAL BUILDING PROGRAMMES.

England. - England has no continuous policy of construction. The rate at which England continues to lay down ships and to push them forward to completion indicates clearly the intention to maintain her position with respect to the other naval powers.

During the year 1906 the following vessels were completed: Battle ships, 4-Africa, Brittania, Hibernia, Dreadnaught. Armored cruisers, 2-Duke of Edinburg, Black Prince. Destroyers, 8-- Colne, Swale, Wear, Gala, Garry, Ness, Nith, Ouse.

The programme for 1906–7 carries an appropriation of £6,800,000 ($34,000,000) for new construction, to be expended as follows: 3 Dreadnaughts, 2 ocean-going destroyers, 12 coastal destroyers, 8 submarines.

The programme for 1907-8 has not yet been announced.

Vessels completed in 1906.

(The speed is given as designed. Italic figures denote speed actually made on trial.]

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BATTLE SHIPS.

Vessel.

Displacement.

Length.

Indicated horsepower.

Speed. Where building.

Programme.

Date of la unch.

Feet.

Tons.
16,500
16,500
Over
18,000
tons.

Agamemnon.
Lord Nelson.
Dreadnought II
Dreadnought III
Dreadnought IV

June, 1906.
Sept., 1906.

Knots.

18. 0
18.0
(?)
(?)
(?)

16,750
16, 750
T. (?)
T. (?)
T. (?)

Beardmore.
Palmer.
Portsmouth.
Devonport

(?)

1904-5
1904-5
1906–7
1906-7
1906-7

Vessels building and to be built-Continued.

Programme.

Date of launch.

1903-4 1903-4 1903-4 1903-4 1904-5 1904-5 1904-5 1905-6 1905-6 1905-6

June, 1905. May, 1905. Sept., 1905. Nov., 1905. June, 1906. Sept., 1906.

1905-6 1905-6 1905-6 1905-6 1905-6 1905-6 1906-7 1906-7

1905-6 May, 1906. 1905-6 Sept., 1906. 1905-6 1905-6 1905-6 1905-6 June, 1906. 1905-6 1905-6 Sept., 1906. 1905-6 1905-6 1905-6 1905-6 1906-7 1906-7 1906-7

1906-7

1906-7 1906-7

1906–7.

1905-6 1906-7

1906.

ARMORED CRUISERS.

Vessel.

Displacement.

Length.

Indicated horsepower.

Speed. Where building.

Feet.

Achiles.
Cochrane.
Natal.
Warrior.
Defence
Minotaur,
Shannon.
Invincible a
Inflexible a.
Indomitablea.

Tons.
13,550
13,550
13,550
13,550
14,600
14,600
14,000
17, 250
17, 250
17, 250

23,500
23,500
23,500
23,500
27,000
27,000
27,000
T(?)
T(?)
T(?)

Knots.

22.5 Armstrong
22.5 Fairfield.
23.3 Barrow
22.5 Pembroke.
23.0 ...do.
23.0 Devonport..
23.0 Chatham.
25.0

Armstrong
25.0 J. Brown & Co.
25.0 Fairfield.

OCEAN-GOING DESTROYERS.

Swift Afridi. Ghurka. Tartar. Mohawk Cossack. One vessel One vessel.

1,800

795
790
770
765

795
(?)
(?)

T30,000
T14, 250
T14, 250
T14,500
T14,500
T14,000

(?)
(?)

36.0
33.0
32.0
23.0
33.0
33.0
(?)
(?)

Laird
Armstrong
Hawthorne
Chiswick.
Cowes.
Laird

(?)
35

COASTAL DESTROYERS.

215
215
215
215
215
235
235

Gadfly.
Glowworm
Gnat.
Grasshopper.
Greenfly
Cricket
Dragonfly.
Firefly.
Sandily
Spider.
Mayfly.
Moth.
4 boats.
2 boats.
2 boats (like Gadfly

class).
2 boats (details not

known).
1 boat.
1 boat.

167 T3,750
167 T3, 750
167 T3,750
167 T3,750
167 T3, 750
175 T3, 750
175 T3, 750
175 T3,750
175 T3, 750
175 T3, 750
172 T3, 750
172 T3,750

27.5 Chiswick.
260 .do.
26.0 ...do.
26.0

...do.
26 0 do.
26.0 Cowes.
26. O do.
26.0 ...do.
26.0 ....do.
26 0 .do.
26.0 Poplar.

do.
Cowes.
Dunbarton.
Hawthorn

235
235
225
225

Thornycroft..
Palmer.
Yarrow

SUBMARINES.

14.0

Vickers..

C1-C11.
DI-D8.

313
(?)

600 (%)

SPECIAL CLASS.

Cyclops (repair ship).

11,000

3,500

12.0

Sunderland.

a These, though officially classed as armored cruisers, are practically fast battle ships.

OFFICE OF NAVAL INTELLIGENCE,

January 1, 1907.

NAVAL BUILDING PROGRAMME.

France.-France has no continuous policy of naval construction.

In submitting its estimates for the budget of 1907 the ministry, in accordance with the recommendations of the superior council, announced the following suitable theoretical composition of the fleet: 38 battle ships, 20 armored cruisers, 6 “squadron scouts," 109 destroyers, 170 torpedo boats, 82 offensive submarines, and 49 defensive submarines.

The number of modern battle ships on hand being far below this figure, authority had been requested during the discussion of the

previous budget for the laying down in 1906 of 6 battle ships. This authority has been affirmed by a recent vote of the chamber. The construction of 2 of these vessels has been ordered at Brest and Lorient, respectively, and a third is to be built by contract. The other 3, the designs of which were somewhat delayed owing to the adoption, after extensive investigation of the subject, of turbine machinery, are also to be laid down as soon as possible, probably at private shipyards.

PROGRAMME OF NEW CONSTRUCTION FOR 1907.

In view of the large number of vessels that are, or will be, under construction, which includes not only the 6 battle ships above mentioned but also 4 others now nearing completion, together with 4 armored cruisers and a large number of torpedo craft, the estimates for 1907 propose the laying down of only 5 destroyers and 10 submarines. The destroyers are to be built by contract, but the submarines-in accordance with custom--at Government dockyards for the purpose of safeguarding official secrets as to their designs.

To fulfill the conditions specified by the superior council there remain to be built the following additions to the fleet, besides those proposed in this year's estimates: 9 battle ships, 6 scouts, 40 destroyers, and 31 offensive submarines.

Several older vessels of small fighting value have been condemned and are gradually being disposed of by sale or otherwise. Among these are the Tage (1886), Cécille (1888), and Suchet (1893), protected cruisers of 7,300, 5,900, and 3,400 tons, respectively.

Vessels completed in 1906.
[Speed is given as designed. Italic figures denote speed actually made on trial.)

BATTLE SHIPS.

Vessel.

Displace-
ment.

Length.

Indicated horsepower.

Speed. !

Where built.

Programme.

Date of launch.

Feet.

République.
Patrie..

Tons.
14,860
14,860

18,000
18,000

Knots.

18.8
19.1

Brest.
La Seyne....

1901
1901

Sept., 1902
Dec., 1903.

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