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and directed to draw warrants upon such fund from time to time, upon the requisition of the State board of examiners, and the State treasurer is hereby authorized and directed to pay such warrants: Provided, One-half of the appropriation herein shall be available in the fifty-seventh fiscal year, and the remaining one-half of said appropriation shall be available in the fifty-eighth fiscal year, except that one-half the funds for making topographic maps shall be available during the twelve months immediately following the passage of this act, and the remaining one-half of this fund shall be available during the second twelve months following the passage of this act.

“Sec. 4. It is hereby made the duty of the surveyor-general and the engineer of the board of public works to render any assistance desired by the State board of examiners in furtherance of the aims of this act.

“This act shall take effect and be in force on and after its passage."!

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OBSOLETE CANNON FOR UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO.

JANUARY 16, 1907.-Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the state of

the Union and ordered to be printed.

Mr. Kahn, from the Committee on Military Affairs, submitted the

following

REPORT.

[To accompany S. 4423.)

The Committee on Military Affairs, to whom was referred the bill (S. 4423) providing for the donation of obsolete cannon with their carriages and equipments to the University of Idaho, report the same back to the House with the recommendation that it be amended as follows:

Strike out all after the enacting clause and insert in lieu thereof the following:

That the Secretary of War be, and he is hereby, authorized to deliver to the University of Idaho, at Moscow, Idaho, two obsolete cannon, with their carriages and equipments, now in possession of said University of Idaho, to become the property of the said university for ornamentation of the grounds of the said university: Provided, That no expense shall be incurred by the United States in the delivery of said cannon.

As so amended your committee recommend that the bill do pass.

A bill (H. R. 15437) has been reported by your committee so amended as to be identical with the bill as here reported, and it is desired that this measure be substituted on the Calendar for said H. R. 15437, the report on said House bill being House Report No. 6401 of the second session Fifty-ninth Congress.

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59TH CONGRESS, | HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES.

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TRANSPORTATION PRIVILEGES TO BELLINGHAM,

WASH.

JANUARY 17, 1907.-Referred to the House Calendar and ordered to be printed.

Mr. NEEDHAM, from the Committee on Ways and Means, submitted

the following

REPORT.

[To accompany H. R. 23114.)

The Committee on Ways and Means, to whom was referred the bill (H. R. 23114) extending to the subport of Bellingham, in the State of Washington, the privileges of the seventh section of the act approved June 10, 1880, governing the immediate transportation of dutiable merchandise without appraisement, having duly considered the same, beg leave to report the bill back without amendment and recommend that it do pass.

This measure meets with the approval of the Treasury Department, as per the attached letter, which is made part of this report.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY,

Washington, January 10, 1907. SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 9th instant, transmitting for an expression of my views thereon House bill 23114, providing for the extension to the subport of Bellingham, in the State of Washington, the privileges of the seventh section of the act approved June 10, 1880. governing the immediate transportation of dutiable merchandise without appraisement, and in reply do state that I see no objection to the passage of said bill. Respectfully,

L. M. SHAW,

Secretary. Hon. SERENO E. PAYNE,

Chairman Committee on Ways and Means, House of Representatives

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2d Session.

No. 6421.

CERTAIN LANDS IN PENNINGTON COUNTY, S. DAK.

JANUARY 17, 1907.-Referred to the House Calendar and ordered to be printed.

Mr. MARTIN, from the Committee on the Public Lands, submitted

the following REPORT.

[To accompany H. R. 23927.)

The Committee on the Public Lands, having had under consideration the bill (H. R. 23927) excepting certain lands in Pennington County, S. Dak., from the operation of the provisions of section 4 of an act approved June 11, 1906, entitled "An act to provide for the entry of agricultural lands within forest reserves," report favorably thereon and recommend the passage of said bill.

On June 11, 1906, the Congress passed an act entitled "An act to provide for the entry of agricultural lands within forest reserves (Public—No. 220). This act provides generally for homestead settlement upon the agricultural lands within the various public forest reserves of the United States. Section 4 of the act excepted the counties of Lawrence and Pennington, in the Black Hills Forest Reserve, in South Dakota, from the operation of the act, except as to the rights of settlers who had commenced their homestead settlements before January 1, 1906. The effect of this exception was to exclude that portion of the forest reserve in the two counties in question from any new homestead settlements, but would permit former settlers to complete their entries.

The reason why the two counties in question were excepted from the general provisions of the law was that they contain large areas of gold deposits and many active and producing mines, and the Committee on the Public Lands considered it best not to extend the provisions of the general homestead laws over these two counties at the time of the passage of the act in question. Very careful investigation shows that the two west tiers of townships in Pennington County are agricultural instead of mineral in character, and the purpose of this bill is simply to extend the operation of the act of June 11, 1906, over the townships in question, leaving the county of Lawrence and the balance of the county of Pennington subject to the operation of the mining laws only except in so far as the old homestead settlements are concerned. The townships covered by the bill are shown to contain many agricultural parks and valleys that are well adapted to agriculture, and for these reasons your committee believe that they should be subject to homestead settlement.

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JANUARY 17, 1907.-Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the

state of the Union and ordered to be printed.

Mr. LILLEY, of Pennsylvania, from the Committee on Coinage,

Weights, and Measures, submitted the following

REPORT.

[To accompany S. 2878.)

The Committee on Coinage, Weights, and Measures, having considered Senate bill 2878, report the same back without amendment and recommend its passage. The committee adopts the Senate report on the same bill by the Senate Committee on Mines and Mining and incorporates it as a portion of this report, as follows:

The Committee on Mines and Mining, to whom was referred the bill (S. 2878) to establish an assay office at Salt Lake City, State of Utah, beg to report and recommend the passage of said bill without amendment.

There are at present assay offices or mints in each of the important mining States with the exception of Utah, namely, coinage mints at San Francisco, Cal.; Carson City, Nev., and Denver, Colo., the two latter being at present conducted as assay offices; assay offices at Boise, Idaho; Helena, Mont. ; Deadwood, S. Dak., and Seattle, Wash.

As shown by the last published report of the Treasury Department on the production of precious metals, the State of Utah in the year of 1904 produced gold and silver of the value of $11,455,894; that amount being exceeded only in three States, namely, Colorado, California, and Montana.

The production of gold in Utah for the calendar year 1904 was $4,215,000. The production of the precious metals for the year 1905 in Utah is, in round figures, $12,000,000. The present year will undoubtedly show a marked increase over these figures. Everything indicates that there will be a steady increase of gold and silver in this State year by year hereafter.

In addition to this, during the last few years the valley of Salt Lake, where it is proposed to establish this office, has become one of the most important smelting sections of the entire country. The American Smelting and Refining Company is now engaged in the construction of a vast smelting plant, whose capacity will probably not be exceeded by any smelting plant in the country. Not only are the ores produced in Utah marketed at this point, but a very large proportion of the ores produced in Nevada and other near-by States are also brought here for reduction. The result is that the amount of gold and silver actually reduced to bullion in the Salt Lake Valley vastly exceeds the amount of production in the State itself.

The need of an assay office at Salt Lake City is probably greater than in many of the States where such offices now exist. If such offices are of the prac. tical benefit in each of the other mining States, and their establishment and continuance would indicate that they are of benefit, no good reason is perceived why such an office should not be established in the State of Utab.

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