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CONGRESS

EXTRA COPIES OF SENATE DOCUMENT 144, FIFTY-NINTH

CONGRESS, SECOND SESSION.

JANUARY 7, 1907.-Ordered to be printed

Mr. CHARLES B. LANDIS, from the Committee on Printing, submitted

the following

REPORT.

[To accompany H. J. Res. 214.]

The Committee on Printing report a joint resolution (H. J. Res. 214) to provide for the printing of 16,000 copies of Şenate Document No. 144, Fifty-ninth Congress, second session, and recommend its passage

CONGRESS

Session

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BRIDGE ACROSS BAYOU BARTHOLOMEW, LOUISIANA.

JANUARY 8, 1907.-Referred to the House Calendar and ordered to be printed.

Mr. Davey, from the Committee on Interstate and Foreign Com

merce, submitted the following

-REPORT.

.

[To accompany H. R. 22338.)

The Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce, to whom was referred the bill (H. R. 22338) to bridge Bayou Bartholomew, in Louisiana, having considered the same report thereon with amendment and as so amended recommend that it pass.

The bill as amended has the approval of the War Department, as will appear by the indorsements attached and which are made a part of this report.

Amend the bill as follows:

At the end of line 7 strike out the period and insert a comma, and insert the following: in accordance with the provisions of an act of Congress entitled “An act to regulate the construction of bridges over navigable waters," approved March twenty-third, nineteen hundred and six.

Add a new section as follows: Sec. 2. That the right to alter, amend, or repeal this act is hereby expressly reserved.

[Second indorsement.)

WAR DEPARTMENT,
OFFICE OF CHIEF OF ENGINEERS,

Washington, December 17, 1906. Respectfully returned to the Secretary of War with recommendation that the accompanying bill (H. R. 22338, 59th Cong., 2d sess.) to authorize the construction of a bridge across Bayou Bartholomew, in Louisiana, be amended as indicated in red thereon.

As thus amended I know of no objection to the favorable consideration of the bill by Congress so far as the interests of navigation are concerned.

A. MACKENZIE,
Brig. Gen., Chief of Engineers, U. 8. Army.

(Third indorsement.)

WAR DEPARTMENT,

December 17, 1906. Respectfully returned to the chairman Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce, House of Representatives, inviting attention to the foregoing report of the Chief of Engineers, United States Army, and to the accompanying copy of amended bill referred to.

ROBERT SHAW OLIVER,

Acting Secretary of War.

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CONGRESS

PREVENTING COLLISIONS AT SEA.

JANUARY 9, 1907.-Referred to the House Calendar and ordered to be printed.

Mr. BIRDSALL, from the Committee on the Merchant Marine and

Fisheries, submitted the following

REPORT.

[To accompany S. 6855.)

The Committee on the Merchant Marine and Fisheries, to whom was referred the bill (S. 6855) to amend the act approved August 19, 1890, entitled “ An act to adopt regulations for preventing collisions at sea,” having considered the said Senate bill, report thereon, recommending that the same do pass without amendment.

The necessity for this legislation is fully set forth in the report of the Senate Committee on Commerce, and such report is hereby adopted and made a part hereof, being as follows:

[Senate Report No. 4625, Fifty-ninth Congress, second session.)

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The Committee on Commerce, to whom was referred the bill (S. 6855) to amend the act approved August 19, 1890, entitled “An act to adopt regulations for preventing collisions at sea,” having considered the same, report thereon with a recommendation that it pass without amendment.

The enactment of the bill is recommended in the annual report of the Commissioner of Navigation for 1906.

By invitation of the United States an international marine conference was held in Washington from October 16 to December 31, 1889. Twenty-eight governments were represented. The principal work of the conference was revision of the international regulations for preventing collisions at sea.

These revised regulations were then submitted to the home governments of all nations represented at the conference. Congress approved the regulations by the act of August 19, 1890, to take effect on a date fixed by proclamation by the President. For several years the revised regulations were discussed in correspondence between the United States and other governments and several minor changes were made. In 1897 an agreement was reached on all the articles except article 9, relating to lights on fishing vessels, and with this exception, the rules were put into force in 1897 and have since worked successfully.

Pending an agreement on revised article 9 Congress by the act of August 13, 1894, provided that article 10 of the old international regulations (which article covered lights on fishing vessels) should remain in force. It is now in force on American fishing vessels.

Revised article 9 has been the subject of correspondence for some years and with minor changes was agreed to last spring by the principal maritime nations and put into force on May 1, 1906.

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