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INDIA.

A SPECIAL CATALOGUE OF THE INDIAN COLLECTION HAS BEEN PREPARED,

AND IS ON SALE IN THE BUILDING, PRICE 25 CENTS.

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CONTRIBUTIONS FROM HER MAJESTY'S COLONIES TO THE

PHILADELPHIA INTERNATIONAL EXHIBITION OF 1876.

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BAHAMAS.

History. A chain of islands lying between 21° 42' and 27° 34' N. lat., and 72° 40' and 79° 3' W. long. The group is composed of about 20 inhabited islands and an immense number of islets and rocks. The principal islands are New Providence (containing the capital, Nassau), Abaco, Harbour Island, Eleuthera, Inagua, Mayaguana, St. Salvador, Andros Island, Great Bahama, Ragged Island, Rum Cay, Exuma, Long Island, Crooked Island, Acklin Island, Long Cay, Watling's Island, the Berry Islands, and the Biminis.

St. Salvador, one of the islands composing this chain, was the first land discovered by Columbus on his voyage in 1492. New Providence was settled by the English in 1629, and held till 1641, when the Spaniards expelled them, but made no attempts to settle there themselves. It was again colonized by England in 1667, but fell into the hands of the French and Spaniards in 1703, after which it became a rendezvous for pirates, who were in 1718 extirpated, when a regular colonial administration was established, and the seat of Government was fixed there. In 1781 the Bahamas were surrendered to the Spaniards, but at the conclusion of the war they were once more annexed by, and finally confirmed to, Great Britain at the Peace of Versailles, 1783.

In 1848 the. Turks and Caicos Islands were separated from the other Bahamas, and formed into a distinct Government, under the Government-in-Chief of the Governor of Jamaica. The Turks and Caicos Islands lie between 21° and 22° N. lat., and 71° and 72° 37' W. long,

Trade and Industry. There are ten colonial custom-houses and ports of entry in the Government of the Bahamas, viz., Nassau, Abaco, Eleuthera, Harbour Island, Exuma, Rum Cay, Long Island, Long Cay, Inagua, and Ragged Island. Considerable quantities of pineapples, oranges, and sponges are exported, chiefly to England and the United States.

The pine-apple crop is very precarious. The industry of salt raking has ceased to be remunerative, owing to the high protective duties imposed on salt by the United States.

Experiments in coffee planting and other branches of industry have been commenced under the patronage of the present Governor. Revenue and Expenditure.

£

£
£

1870
40,710

47,270
1864 102,024

98,636

1871
41,869

40,662
1865
84,488
83,549

1872
37,574

39,000
1866
53,283
76,985

1873
55,289

51,881
1867
46,826
80,372

1874
37,283

38,374
1868
40,777
68,306

Public Debt, 1873, 65,0811.
1869
35,576

39,304

Imports and Exports.

£

£
£
£

1870 283,970 190,253
1864 5,346,132 4,672,398

1871 239,190 152,410
1865 1,470,467 2,063,474

1872 201,051 136,224
1866
328,622 261,972

1873 226,306 156,613
1867
365,316 227,248

1874 183,993 130,293
1868 231,526 131,522

Population. 1869 240,584 163,002

39,162 (Census 1871).

(From Colonial Office List, 1876.") The history of the Bahamas began in 1492, when Columbus, the great pioneer, navigator, and discoverer of a New World landed on the shore of Guanaliani and named it St. Salvador. Commerce did not immediately follow in the wake of discovery, but about 250 years after that event, pine apples were grown at and exported from Eleuthera, and 50 years later cotton was extensively cultivated, and salt and wood added to the exports.

At the present time the colony's staples are salt, fruit, sponge, barks, dye and furniture woods, guano, and straw, turtle shell, fish scale and shell work.

The articles on exhibition fairly represent the productions and manufactures of these islands, and both migl. be indefinitely extended. But it is not the commercial position of the Bahamas only which should make a knowledge of them general. Their equality and wonderful salubrity of climate commend them to all who seek a genial, healthy, life-giving atmosphere. As a winter home for the afflicted, Peter Henry Bruce wrote nearly a century and a half ago, “It is no wonder the sick fly hither for relief, being sure to find a cure here." Moders travellers also testify that as a resort from damp and cold to sunshine and summer for those who require change and climatic benefit the Bahamas offer peculiar advantages. The heat is tempered by an ocean breeze of softness and purity seldom experienced elsewhere. Tropical flowers gladden the eye, and the luscious pineapple, orange, and melon tempt the palate with their freshness and beauty. Fish abound in the clear pellucid waters surrounding these islands, and the northern fowl seek a home on the lakes. In a word, the Bahamas scem by nature fitted as a grand sanitarium for the afflicted from the North American Continent, and as a moet desirable winter resort for all who wish to escape the rigours of the Northern Season.

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3 pieces Green Ebony (dye), largely exported
to London. 4 pieces Braziletto Wood (do.),
generally exported to the United States. I
piece Logwood (do.), generally exported to
London. To be sold to the highest bidder.
Nos. I to 11.

Cl. 600, 601.

SPECIMENS OF WOODS (MANUFAC

TURED).
Where the Price is given it is always to be

understood as in Gold in Bond.
Sawyer, R. I., & Co. i log Sabicu or
Horseflesh (furniture), very durable wood,
used for building purposes.

2 crotchets Mahogany or Madeira (do.), this wood is largely exported to London. 2 pieces Satin Wood (do.), this wood is largely exported to London. 1 piece Bull Wood (do.), a new wood not at present exported, very handsomely curled. 1 piece Cedar (do.), used for building purposes. 1 piece Cocoanut Wood (do.) 1 piece Stopper Wood (do.), very durable, used principally for the piles of wharves. I ship's Knee of Sabicu ; knees like the one exhibited can be largely exported.

George, Jno. S. 1 piece Logwood (dye), Cl. 600, 601. generally exported to London. 4 pieces Braziletto (do.), generally exported to the United States. 2 pieces Green Ebony (do.) 1 piece Yellow pine (furniture), large forests of Pitch Pine are in the Bahamas not utilized. 1 piece Sabicu or Horseflesh (do.) 1 piece Mahogany (do.) 1 piece Cedar (do.) 1 piece Satin Wood (do.) 1 piece Stopper Wood (do.) 1 piece Orange Wood (do.), not at present exported. 1 piece Lignum Vitæ (do.), exported to London. Nos. 12 to 22.

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