Art in the Courtroom

Pirmais vāks
Greenwood Publishing Group, 1998 - 266 lappuses

Providing legal analysis and touching upon social history and art history themes, this work offers an objective review of five art trials. Spanning the last 20 years, specific areas of law are examined with each trial: First and Fifth Amendments, copyright law, contract law, valuation of art, and misrepresentation. Art, outside of the legal vacuum, has been embroiled in a battle initiated by social conservatives to promote decency. Three trials involving this struggle and the National Endowment of the Arts are analyzed. The valuation of art is examined in the context of Andy Warhol's estate and copyright law is considered because of the appropriation of contemporary images by Jeff Koons. Although each trial is reviewed distinctly, all are interwoven to present major issues relating to contemporary art.

Entertaining aspects of each trial contribute to the understanding of art and law. For art students, copyright, contract and constitutional analysis in the context of actual hearings is an invaluable resource outlining afforded protections and options. To scholars interested in contemporary art and its encounters with the law, this text bridges the gap between two seemingly disparate worlds.

No grāmatas satura

Lietotāju komentāri - Rakstīt atsauksmi

LibraryThing Review

Lietotāja recenzija  - dpbrewster - LibraryThing

An excellent book by a good friend and law school classmate. An entertaining and learned analysis of several legal cases involving famous artists. Vilis is now an artist and gallery owner in Marfa, Texas. Lasīt pilnu pārskatu

Atlasītās lappuses

Saturs

Jeff Koons Piracy or Fair Use?
1
Richard Serra Whose Property Is It Anyway?
49
David Wojnarowicz The Sanctity of Art?
93
Andy Warhol How Much For That Painting of a Campbells Soup Can?
149
Karen Finley NEA Funding Is It Decent?
219
Bibliography
261
Index
263
Autortiesības

Citi izdevumi - Skatīt visu

Bieži izmantoti vārdi un frāzes

Populāri fragmenti

127. lappuse - ... the purpose and character of the use, including whether such use is of a commercial nature or is for nonprofit educational purposes; 2. the nature of the copyrighted work; 3. the amount and substantiality of the portion used in relation to the copyrighted work as a whole; and 4. the effect of the use upon the potential market for or value of the copyrighted work.
126. lappuse - ... any false designation of origin, false or misleading description of fact, or false or misleading representation of fact, which (A) is likely to cause confusion, or to cause mistake, or to deceive as to the affiliation, connection, or association of such person with another person, or as to the origin, sponsorship, or approval of his or her goods, services, or commercial activities by another person...
249. lappuse - If there is a bedrock principle underlying the First Amendment, it is that the Government may not prohibit the expression of an idea simply because society finds the idea itself offensive or disagreeable...
13. lappuse - In truth, in literature, in science and in art, there are, and can be, few, if any, things, which, in an abstract sense, are strictly new and original throughout. Every book in literature, science and art, borrows, and must necessarily borrow, and use much which was well known and used before.
79. lappuse - That if any person shall infringe the copyright in any work protected under the copyright laws of the United States...
157. lappuse - The fair market value is the price at which the property would change hands between a willing buyer and a willing seller, neither being under any compulsion to buy or sell and both having reasonable knowledge of relevant facts.
219. lappuse - Government; (2) that a high civilization must not limit its efforts to science and technology alone but must give full value and support to the other great branches of man's scholarly and cultural activity...
229. lappuse - Humanities may be used to promote, disseminate, or produce materials which in the judgment of the National Endowment for the Arts or National Endowment for the Humanities may be considered obscene, including but not limited to, depictions of sadomasochism, homo-eroticism...
33. lappuse - At the one extreme some works of genius would be sure to miss appreciation. Their very novelty would make them repulsive until the public had learned the new language in which their author spoke. It may be more than doubted, for instance, whether the etchings of Goya or the paintings of Manet would have been sure of protection when seen for the first time.

Par autoru (1998)

VILIS R. INDE is an attorney, who has practiced law in New York and Minnesota.

Bibliogrāfiskā informācija