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Table shouring the fluctuations of several of the leading varieties of fish at Boston for five

years, commencing January, 1880Continued.

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January, 1880.
January, 1881
January, 1842.
January, 1883.
January, 1884.
F bruary, 1880
February, 1881
February, 1882
February, 1883
February, 1884
March, 1880
March, 1881
March, 1882
March, 1883
March, 1884
April, 1880.
April, 1881
April, 1882.
April, 1883.
April, 1884.
May, 1880.
May, 1881.
May, 1842.
May, 1883.
May, 1884.
June, 1880
June, 1881
June, 1882
June, 1883
June, 1884
July, 1880.
July, 1881..
July, 1882..
July, 1883..
July, 1884.
August, 1880.
August, 1881
August, 1882.
August, 1883.
August, 1884.
September, 1850
September, 1881
September, 1882
September, 1883
September, 1884
October, 1880
October, 1881
October, 1882
October, 1883
October, 1881
November, 1850
November, 1841
November, 1882
November, 1883
November, 1884
December, 1880.
December, 1881.
December, 1892.
Derember, 1893.
December, 1884..

14

15
22 to. 221

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.14
. 13
.12

23
. 10
.16
.14

22 . 16

18) . 23 to .29

.14

22 .19 . 15

28 . 16 22

14 .14

.14 .24 to .25

10

.16
. 13 14

.12
24
10
18
13

5.00

4.37
5. 25
5, 25

. 20 . 20 .30

.16 . 25

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.16

20 .22 to.23

23

. 26 .13 19

23

.17 . 16

.22 . 20

. 22

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. 70

. 75

17

.16 .08} to. 10

.16 .16 .17

.13 07 to, 10

.13 .14 .17

.25

. 20 .084 14 . 15 .18 .20

. 26 . 16 . 13 . 16

18

.22 154 to .16

.12

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5.06

6. 25

10 .15

14 .17

.12 .08 to 10

. 13 .08

45 to .50

30

4.25

. 10

ELEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE Boston Fish BUREAU, JANUARY, 1886.

OFFICE OF Boston Fish BUREAU,

Boston, January 1, 1886. In reviewing the fish trade for the past twelve months it is with a feeling of satisfaction and pride that we are able to point to the fact that, in face of a large decrease in the catches of fish by the fleets, the receipts at Boston have held their own, proving beyond question that as a market for the different varieties of fish and as a distributing point its facilities are unequaled.

Table showing the fluctuations of several of the leading rarieties of fish at Boston for fire

years, commencing January, 1880.

Month and year.

Haddock.

Cusk.

Pickled
Pollock.

Slack-salted

pollock

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January, 1880.
January, 1881.
January, 1882.
January, 1883.
January, 1884.
February, 1880
February, 1881
February, 1852
February, 1883
February, 1884
Marih, 1880
March, 1881
March, 1842
March, 1883
March, 1884
April, 1880.
April, 1881..
April, 1842.
April, 1883.
April, 1481..
May, lano.
May, 1891.
May, 1952.
May, 1883.
May, 1481.
June, 1xx0
June, 1551
June, 1492
June, 1883
June, 18*
July, 1450.
July, 1841.
July, 1842.
July, 1883.
July, 1884.
August, 1880.
August, 1881.
August, 1882.
August, 1883.
August, 1884.
September, 1980
September, 1XX1
September, 1842
September, 1843
September, 1881
October, 18so.
October, 1881
October, 1882
October, 1883
October, 1881
November, 1880
November, 1881
November, 1862
November, 18,3
November, 1884
December, 1880.
December, 1881..
December, 18-2.
December, 1883.
December, 1881.

2. 12
2.00

1.75
1.50 to 2.00

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2.50 3.75

3.00

2.00

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Table showing the fructuations of several of the leading varieties of fish at Boston for five

years, commencing January, 1880Continued.

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Per barrel.

$6.00

5.50

.60

.60

.18

.75

5.62 6.00 5.00

. 20

. 26

.18

Per bor. Per bor. Per bor. Per bor.
$0.12
$0.15

$0.13 $0.50 to $0.60
.14
.18
.16

.50 .14 .17 .13

.80 . 20 .24 .18

1. 10 .13 14

12 .571 to .65 .12 . 15:)

.14 .50 .14

18

. 16 . 15

14

.80

1. 20 .13 $0.15) to . 16

.13 . 15 .50 .12 .18 $0.15 to .16

.50 .16 20 . 200 17

.65 15 18

. 14 . 40 .80 22 28

1. 10 .13

. 16
.16
. 23

.13 .25 to .30 $0.13 to. 15 15 to .17

16 14 .16 .16

12: .25 to 35
202
26

22
13
. 16

13
. 15

. 16

5.75

4. 62

.13

5.00

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January, 1880.
January, 1881
January, 1852.
January, 1883.
January, 1884.
Fbruary, 1880
February, 1881
February, 1882
February, 1883
February, 1884
March, 1880
March, 1881
March, 1882
March, 1883
March, 1884
April, 1880.
April, 1881
April, 1882
April, 1883.
April, 1884.
May, 1880.
May, 1881.
May, 1842.
May, 1883.
May, 1884.
June, 1880
June, 1881
June, 1882

1883
June, 1884
July, 18so.
July, 1881.
July, 1882.
July, 1883.
July, 1881.
August, 1880.
August, 1891.
August, 1892.
August, 1883.
August, 1884.
September, 1880
September, 1881
September, 1892
September, 1883
September, 1884
October, 1880
October, 1881
October, 1892
October, 1883
October, 1884
November, 1850
November, 1881
November, 1882
November, 1883
November, 1884
December, 1850.
December, 1881.
December, 1842.
December, 1843.
December, 1884..

. 20 . 13 .14 .14

14 24 to .25

. 10

16
. 13 .14

.12
.24

18 23 to.29

14 22 .19 15 28!

.14

. 13 .12 . 23

5.00

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. 10 .18 .13

4.37
5. 25
5,25

.14 . 16

25 .11 .17

14 . 13

22 . 20 20 .30 .16

. 20 22 to.23

23 .26

$1.50 to 5.00

. 12 . 23 .11 .16

13 . 15 .13 .10 .17 .13 .17

. 20

. 13

5.00 5.75 to 6.00

4.25

4. 75 4.25 5. 75

5.87 5.50

.19

.55

22 20

. 23 22 .25

.80

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.084

08 to. 10

.17 .16 .17

. 16 .08to. 10

.16 .16 .17

. 13 .07 to, 10

13 .14

. 20 .14 .18

5.00 to 5.12

5. 75
6.00

.15 . 20

60 to .65 .53 .60 .70

. 75

21 . 26

16 .13 . 16 .18

.084 .13 .13 .18 14 10 15 .14 .17

.70 .40 to .65

.50 .65

5. 06

. 70

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.12

.45 to .50

.30

4. 25

.08

.08 to .10

ELEVENTH ANNUAL RE PORT OF THE Boston Fish BUREAU, JANUARY, 1886.

OFFICE OF Boston Fish BUREAU,

Boston, January 1, 1886. In reviewing the fish trade for the past twelve months it is with a feeling of satisfaction and pride that we are able to point to the fact that, in face of a large decrease in the catches of fish by the fleets, the receipts at Boston have held their own, proving beyond question that as a market for the different varieties of fish and as a distributing point its facilities are unequaled.

a

Low prices have been the rule in most lines during the year, bringing fish on a par with most food products.

The early Potomac herring fishery was fairly successful, but not as large as that of the year previous. The catches of mackerel and codfish' have been fully up to the average, but when compared with the large catches of the year previous considerable shortage is noticed.

The falling off in the codfish catch we attribute, in a great measure, to the withdrawal of several large bank vessels from the cod-fishing business, on account of the poor encouragement offered by the low prices at the beginning of the season, and not on account of the scarcity of these fish, vessels arriving from Grand and Quereau Banks with fares averaging larger than those which arrived from there during the previous season. While this is true in regard to the catch of codfish, the shortage in the catch of mackerel is attributable to the fact that they were not as abundant in our waters as during the season of 1884. While the catch of mackerel on our New England shore has not been as large in 1885 as in the previous year, the catch in North Bay, or Bay St. Lawrence, has been larger, showing the mackerel were more abundant there the past year than in 1884.

During the past season there have been 44 vessels from New England ports engaged in the North Bay mackerel fishery, as against 108 during the season of 1884, the number of barrels of bay mackerel inspected during the past season being 27,672, as against 19,637 for the season of 1884. The catch of mackerel by the provincial fleet, on the Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island shores, has been below an average in quantity, and this, in connection with the duty, accounts for the large shortage noticeable in the receipts of foreign mackerel, which shortage has been mainly on the poorer and smaller grades of fish, which could not well afford to pay the heavy duties exacted, and which have been used for the West India markets, in place of sending them to the States. All fat mackerel have been wanted and readily taken by the trade. According to the most reliable authorities the catch of cod at Newfoundland has been up to the average in quantity. The receipts of codfish from Newfoundland, however, are not much of a factor in the fish trade of Boston, the most of their business being with Spain, Portugal, and Brazil, to which countries they send yearly enormous quantities of codfish.

The Labrador herring fishery has been an exceptionally good one, large quantities of herring of good size and excellent quality having been taken. About 15,000 barrels of them reached this market, and sold from $3.75 to $4.75 per barrel.

Mackerel. --The fleet made its usual early start for the southern fishery, the first vessel to start being the schooner Mollie Adams, of Gloucester, on March 4. This is the earliest departure for the southern mackerel fishery on record. The first fare of fresh mackerel for the season (125 barrels) was taken in by the schooner Emma Brown, of Gloucester, at New York, on the afternoon of March 28, she being followed, a few minutes later, by the schooner Nellie N. Rowe, of Gloucester, with about the same amount of fish. Great rivalry exists among the fishermen as to who shall land the first fare of mackerel. The Rowe was successful in 1883 and 1884, landing the first fare at New York on March 31, 1883, and March 24, 1884.

During the subsequent mackerel fishing in southern waters enormous quantities of very small and inferior fish were taken into New York and Philadelphia, large quantities of which were sold for merely nothing, and many fares were taken to sea again and thrown overboard, resulting in a general loss to the fleet, although a lucky few did fairly well. We hope to see the bill prohibiting the importation or catching of mackerel between the 1st day of March and the 1st day of June become a law. This would put a stop to the catching of large quantities of very small mackerel, and would unquestionably

be a benefit to all parties interested, whether dealers, fishermen, or consumers. The general run of the mackerel taken this season by our shore fleet has been better in size and quality than that of the year previous, there being but little difference between 2's and 3's, making dealers ready buyers of 3's as placed on the market. Prices have hardly ruled even with those for the year 1884, especially when quality and cull are considered. The first sale of new salt mackerel for the season was at New York, on April 6, at $3 per barrel, from pickle, with barrel; selling in cargo lots at Boston, in May, at from $2 to $2.75, from pickle, with barrel; in June, at from $2.75 to $3.75, from pickle, with barrel; in July, at from $3 to $4.25, from pickle, with barrel, for shores, and $9.75 to $13, from pickle, with barrel, for Block Islands; in August, at $2.50 to $3 for 3's, $5 to $5.50 for 2’s, and $10 to $12 for l's, packed from vessel, for Massachusetts Bay; in September, at $5.50 to $6.25, from pickle, with barrel, and $3.25 to $4 for 3's, $6 to $6.50 for 2's, and $13 to $14 for l's, packed from vessel, for Massachusetts Bays and Eastern Shores; in October, at from $6.25 to $7.50, from pickle, with barrel, for Massachusetts Bays and Eastern Shores, and in November, at $6 to $6.50, from pickle, with barrel, for Eastern Shores. Nova Scotia mackerel have sold from $6 to $8 per barrel; Prince Edward Island mackerel from $6 to $15 per barrel. The first receipts from the island were on July 13.

Large bodies of mackerel were on the Labrador coast during the past season, and there is no doubt that if fishermen had been prepared and knew how to handle them there would have been some fish from that section. Some fine few lots received that were well handled proved of fine quality and sold for $17.50 per barrel; they were of large size and fat.

Terrings.-As has been stated, the Potomac herring fishery was a good one as far as the taking of herrings went; prices ruled low. Owing to the fact that the cheaper grades of herring, such as Dalhousie and Georges Bay, of which in previous years we have received large quantities, would be almost entirely excluded by the duty of $1 per barrel, a great many more vessels were fitted out for shore herring fishery than usual, hoping to make up, as much as possible, the difference caused by the imposition of the duty. We estimate the last season's catch at from 25,000 to 30,000 barrels, which is an unusually large catch. They sold during the season at from $2 to $2.50 per barrel in cargo lots, according to contract. The frozen-herring industry, which is yet in its infancy, is developing rapidly. The principal fishing grounds are at Eastport, Grand Manan, New Brunswick, and Fortune Bay, Newfoundland. The receipts at Boston during the year 1885 were about 30,000 barrels, or 15,000,000 fish. These fish are used very extensively by the Georges Bank cod and haddock fishermen as bait during the winter season. Large quantities are also used for food purposes, being shipped in a frozen state nearly all over the United States, the first vessel to arrive here with a cargo of them for the season of 1884-85 being the Anna and Lilla, of Portland, from Eastport, with 150,000 fish, on December 18, 1884. The same vessel also brought the first cargo for the season of 1885–86, 200,000 fish, on December 17, 1885, from Eastport. They have been selling during the season at from 25 cents to $1.50

per

hundred. The Georges Bay and Nova Scotia splits have been almost an entire failure. Dalhousie herrings have not been saved this season, as the fishermen could not pay the duty exacted. None have been received in the States the past year.

Labrador herrings have been in good supply, and, as has been stated before, have sold from $3.75 to $4.75 per barrel, which seem like fair prices. Still, results to the fishermen have been poor.

Codfish.—The catch shows a falling off of some 10 per cent, and prices for the season have hardly ruled with those of 1884. The range of prices has been $2.75 to $3.75 per quintal for large dry Bank, $2.50 to $3 per quintal for mediums, $2.50 to $3.50 for large picked Bank, and $2.50 to $3 for mediums. Catches of pollock and cusk have been sight, while the catch of hake has been somewhat larger than for the previous season; yet it has not been large enough to be called an average catch. The shortages in these varieties have not been missed by the trade, owing to the large supplies of low-priced codfish.

Salmon and trout.The catches of these articles have been fully up to the usual average, and prices have been advanced just about the duties over those of 1884, salmon ranging from $10 to $15 for Northern, $8 to $13 for California; trout, $8 to $10 per barrel.

Box herrings.—The receipts in this line show some little falling off, mainly from the provinces; prices have ruled lower than for 1884.

Bloaters. -Bloaters have been in good supply, demand fair, and prices have ruled from 40 to 90 cents per box. While our receipts give small amount as coming from foreign ports, more than one-half of entire receipts are from New Brunswick, entered and duty paid at Eastport. Same is also true of box herrings; over one-half of receipts from home ports are from New Brunswick.

Canned fish.The popularity of these goods is steadily increasing with the con

Canned mackerel.--As was to be expected, with care on the part of the packers, looking to the using of only good stock in its preparation, the season just closed has proved that the packers have not secured all the stock required by the trade. Prices have ranged from 75 cents to $1 per dozen, and stocks have gone out quite clean.

Cunned lobsters. There has been a fair pack of this article. The opening price was $1.60 per dozen, but it has hardly been maintained, and sales at the close of the year were at $1.50 per dozen.

Sardines.-While the catch of fish suited to the packing of these goods has been a light one during the past season, prices have been well maintained and have, no doubt, left fair margins of protit to the packers. The outlet for these goods is steadily increasing

Fresh fish.-Although we have never attempted to tabulate the statistics of the enormous quantities of fresh fish handled at Boston, we have, during the past year, taken account of the receipts of fresh mackerel, which amount to 43,843 barrels,

sumers.

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