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The losses of life include 54 from dories, most of which were lost in the fog, many of them no doubt dying from starvation, when, with the expense of a few dollars for providing each dory with water and sealed cans of food, many lives and untold suffering might have been prevented. The Cape Ann Advertiser of July 13, in regard to the subject, says: "These kind of losses are becoming as familiar as a twice-toid tale, and attract far too little attention. Forty-two men in all went astray in a fog in May and June, a dozen of whom are kn yn to have been lost and most of the others sulfering all the pangs of death for many hours. Is it not time that some better scheme was devised for communication between the men and the trawls and their vessel and for supplying the necessities of the men while lost in the fogs?" As in the case of passenger vessels, a little legislation may be beneficial and save many lives. The large loss of life and property that is almost sure to follow winter fishing on Georges Banks also calls up the question, Should it not be discontinued during the inclement season of the year?

The number of vessels from each port will be found on pages 17 and 19. These represent vessels only engaged in the salt-fish trade. Boston and several other ports having large fleets engaged in supplying the country with fresh fish-of them we have no statistics, either men, vessels, or catch. During the past year Massachusetts has added 37 sail to the mackerel fishery, 28 to the cod fishery; Maine, 14 to the former and 8 to the latter; total, 87 new vessels to the New England fleets.

NEW HAMPSHIRE.

For the first time in our reports this State does not appear. Her single port, that for so many years was largely interested in the fisheries, is now only represented in the fresh-fish trade, in which quite a business is carried on.

THE FISHING INDUSTRY.

Of late years not only this country but most foreign countries are paying increased attention to this industry. This will be noticed through the press and numerous publications, as well as the numerous exhibitions or fish fairs. The Dutch appear to have started the movement of fish fairs by holding one at Amsterdam in 1861. This was followed by others as follows: Bergen, Norway, 1865; Areachon and Boulogne, France, 1866; Hague, 1867; Gothenburg, 1867; Havre, 1868; Naples, 1871; London, 1878; Berlin, 1880; Norwich, England, 1881; London, 1883. These fairs have no doubt been of much value to the industry. The United States has been ably represented at the Berlin and late fair at London, through the management of the United States Figh Commission, receiving a large share of the honors, a large number of which came to exhibitors from this city; our dealers also receiving numerous prizes at Aalberg, Denmark, the past season. We trust the day is not far remote when we shall have a world's fish fair in this country, and Boston is the place for it.

CENSUS FISHING REPORT.

In our report of last year we gave nearly a full report from advanced bulletins. As it was not complete, we reproduce a complete report of the fishing industry of the United States in 1880. The report was taken under direction of the United States Fish Commission, and is by far the most complete and reliable report of the fisheries ever made by the Government.

Mackerel. Of the various branches of the fisheries this always receives the most attention. Our chart will be found of interest, as showing at a glance the great fluctuations in tủe catch and quality. The very small amount shown at the commencement is of historic interest when we recall those years as being unsafe to fish off our shores during a foreign war. The Massachusetts catch the past season amounted to 168,811 barrels against 258,382 barrels in 1882, a large decrease of 89,571 barrels. The southern fleet, numbering 129 sail, as usual of late years, started early, sailing March 12, landing the first catch in New York March 31. The early catch was followed with fair success; mostly being landed fresh accounts for the small amount of cured fish reported as taken south. The fish were found to be abundant and of mixed sizes. As the season advanced the fleet worked off the New England shores, fewer fish constantly being seen. The fishermen, being of the opinion that a large body of mackerel were off this coast but did not show themselves, were not willing to leave the favored grounds of the past few years. About 50 sail went to North Bay in July, returning with poor reports and few fish. Later in the season, the catch not improve ing and more favorable reports having been received from North Bay, quite a fleet once more went there, returning with fine fares of fish of a fair quality and size. The total number of United States vessels fishing in North Bay during the season was 63, with a catch of 28,666 barrels. The catch off the New England shores amounted to 185,019 barrels; the southern catch, 13,000; total catch of salted mackerel by the New England fleet, 226,685, a decrease of 152,178 barrels from that of the previous year. The schooner Edward E. Webster, Capt. Solomon Jacobs, as for several years, is once more “high line,” with the following fine record: Sailed from Gloucester March 15; hauled up November 20; during which time, with a crew of 17 men, caught 2,160 barrels of mackerel that were salted, and 400,000 mackerel were sold fresh, realizing gross $27,440, or net $25,700, the crew sharing $709.75 each. During the season three trips were made to North Bay and 1,100 barrels of the catch taken there. Captain Jacobs adds to his report: “It is my opinion the body of large mackerel will be in North Bay in 1884 and the small fish off this shore.The catch of the l'rince Edward Island fishermen is estimated as 10 per cent over that of the previous year, with a slight improvement in quality. The Nova Scotia catch also shows an increase. Of the provincial catch, 75,226 barrels came to this market, against 37.616 in 1882.

Ground fish, in which we include cod, hake, haddock, cusk, and pollock, show a large gain over that of 1882, which also showed a gain of 123,877 quintals over that of 1881, the increase being largely of codfish from the Grand Banks. The catch of all kinds of ground fish off the New England shore has been light most of the season. The Grand Bank fleet returned from short voyages with full fares, some of them the largest ever known. A general depression in trade, lower ices of provisions, the revolution in Haiti, restricting the large foreign demand from that island, with a largely increased catch, have all had a tendency to depress the market, which shows the large decline from $5.50 to $6 of one year ago to $3.50 and $4 a quintal at the present time. The total catch of cured fish by the New England feets amounted to 903,283 quintals of codfish and 156,215 quintals of hake and other cheap. grades, against 663,564 of cod and 235,340 of low grades in 1882. The total catch this season is 1,059,498 quintals; gain over 1882, 160,594 quintals.

Pickled herring.–The domestic receipts show a falling off from last year, the shorecatch having been less than the average. This market has at nearly all times been well supplied from the catch of the Provinces, and the receipts have been the largest of which we have any record. Not for many years, if ever, has the market been as well supplied with Labrador herring as at the present. While the size is not as large as the Northeast shore herring, the quality is much superior. The present price is only about half that of the past few years. This fact is of importance to dealers and consumers, especially when the decreased catch and very small amount of mackerel is taken into consideration.

Box herring show a large decrease in receipts, and prices have been much higher than in 1882; a reduced catch and increased amount packed as American sardines account for the short supply during a large part of the year. The fall and winter catch has been fully an average one. Prices are again very low and the supply ample.

Alewives.—Receipts vary but little from 1882. A slight gain in both domestic and foreign.

Salmon. During most of the year the supply was moderate and prices ruled high. This season's catch has been larger and prices are again lower.

Canned fish.The canning of fish to an extensive amount dates back only a few years, yet, contrary to general expectation, the demand steadily increases, the amount packed in New England the past year having only been limited by the catch. Owing to the small and poor quality of the mackerel, factories have been obliged to shut down or pack other than fish products much of the time. Canned goods from the Boston factories received many honors at the recent exhibit at London, and, through that, numerous orders from Australia and other remote countries. The American-packed sardines grow in favor yearly, judging from the amount packed. The 18 factories at Eastport, Me., packed the past season 200,000 cases of 100 boxes each, two-thirds of them being packed in oil, one-third in mustard and spices. Three thousand barrels of Russian sardines were also packed. These factories alone gave employment to 1,200 men and women and 800 boys and girls, and some 500 fishermen to supply them with fish.

Other varieties of fish products are without special notice, this market having been able to fill orders for all salt-water products, dry, pickled, smoked, canned, or fresh, at nearly all times during the past year; also supplying the producers with salt, cooperage, hooks, lines, nets, oil clothing, and all necessary outfit. Of fishing nets, everything needed, from those large and strong enough for porpoises and sharks to the fine linen thread used in the shad fisheries, are manufactured in this city, supplying all parts of the country.

The near termination of the Washington ten-year fishing treaty with Great Britain is of importance, expiring July 1, 1885. The coming year practically closes any benefits either country may receive through it. The table on page 873 will be found of interest as showing the amount of fish yearly imported the past ten years. We trust some mutually satisfactory arrangement to all interested may be provided ere the termination of the treaty, that the barmonious relations of the past ten years may not be broken. In case no action is taken, the duty on imported fish products from July 1, 1885, will be as follows:

Mackerel 1 cent a pound; herring, pickled or salted, one-half of 1 cent a pound; salmon, pickled, 1 cent a pound; other fish, pickled, in barrels, 1 cent per pound.

Foreign-caught fish, imported, otherwise than in barrels or half-barrels, whether fresh, smoked, dried, salted, or pickled, not specially enumerated or provided for in this act, 50 cents per 100 pounds.

Anchovies and sardines, packed in oil or otherwise, in tin boxes, measuring not more than 5 inches long, 4 inches wide, and 31 inches deep, 10 cents per whole box; in half-boxes, measuring not more than 5 inches long, 4 inches wide, and 14 deep, 5 cents each; in quarter boxes, measuring not more than 4 inches long, 3} inches wide, and 1} deep, 29 cents each; when imported in any other form, 40 per cent ad valorem.

Fish preserved in oil, except anchovies and sardines, 30 per cent ad valorem.

Salmon and all other fish, prepared or preserved, and prepared meats of all kinds, not specially enumerated or provided for in this act, 25 per cent ad valorem.

Oils, cod-liver, crude or refined seal, whale, and fish oils, not elsewhere specified, 25 per cent.

It is our sad duty to notice the death of two of our members, both of them men of mark in different branches of our trade.

James Brown, of Brown, Seavey & Co., died July 17, aged 65. For forty years Mr. Brown was extensively engaged in the fish business, his firm being especially prominent in the fresh-fish line. He was chiefly known to his many friends and business associates for his sterling integrity and social disposition. His familiar face will long be missed.

Edward Lyon, of Lyon, Dupuy & Co., died at New York, October 13, aged 44. Mr. Lyon was born and spent his early life in England; after which, for several years, he lived at Haiti; from there he came to Boston and formed the present firm, of which he was the senior member. He also established a house in New York, making his home in that city the past few years. Personally he was not as well known to the trade as his firm, they having for the past eleven years been very large exporters of fish to the West Indies.

In closing this report, we return thanks to our many friends and correspondents that have at all times so freely assisted us in keeping a daily record of the fishing industry. In this report we return the result of the year's business, with the compliments of the season and our best wishes for the future.

W. A. Wilcox, Secretary.

Receipts of fish by Boston dealers from foreign and domestic ports, 1883.

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3733

Mackerel barrels..' 1, 267 3,058 314 4,704, 2, 386 1,013 850 208 1,146 280 760 10,990
Mackerel, Boston fleet,

inspected barrels
Herrings:
Pickled barrels. 217 1,881 249 3. 307 129 762 271 129 239

283 7,506 Frozen

.do.. 1, 735 800 1,907 7,031 3,091 137 Salmon..

160 14

160

114 160
Alewives:
Pickled.
do....

321
601

23 8 120 1,167 1,650) 3,28? Smoked .do.

64

13

139 Trout..

.do.. Shad

.do. Herrings, smoked boxes.. 583

80' 2,100 12,000 32, 373 1,68031, 157 1,500 14, 240 25,000 Bloaters, smoked...do.. 1,566

2,599

1, 402 1,038 406 210 Boneless fish .......do. 364 508 1,142 1,000 915

859 78 1,493

1,056 Mackerel, canned ..do. 86

100

300: Lobsters, canned ...do..

50

253 1,161 Codfish ..quintals.. 9,764 4,520 5,541 7,125 4,636 874 4,387 1,838' 6, 791 274 6,531 3,792 Hake. do.. 1,900 72 919 30 120 75 800

175 200 Haddock do.. 80

92
136 141 25 80

60
Pollock.
.do.

100

311 15 Cusk

.do.

26

Receipts of fish by Boston dealers from foreign and domestic ports, 1883Continued.

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Mackerel .barrels. . 3, 814 1,508 6,303 10,870 2,907 13, 614 6,067 10,456 2, 4937, 328 1,495 11, 137 Mackerel, Boston fleet, in

spected .barrels.. Herrings: Pickled

6,741

443 8,571 429 9,123 4,969 28, 013 1,555 10, 279 315 8,335 Frozen .do..

731 350 Salmon

.do..

1-10
678 80 288

80 764 80 523 480 695 Alewives: Pickled. do.... 332 3,003

1, 520

632

110 Smoked

.do... Trout.. .do..

6

1,578 Shad .do.

199 501

310 Herrings, smoked.. boxes 27, 966 28,500 29, 502 16, 825 70,67831, 281 48,927 14, 853 22, 861 39, 265 4,018 11,503 Bloaters, smoked... do....

4,028 13, 026 1,579 1,917 Boneless fish .....do.... 1,217

2,043
3, 775
4,810
2, 183

151 Mackerel, canned.. do.... 1, 461 4,019

1, 460 220 3,785

81 232 Lobsters, canned ...do...

2,748

8, 666
200 1,054

78

174 Codfish .quintals.. 5,723 3, 192 7,163 7,733 9,879 6,597 15, 498 12, 558 13, 090 8,193 15,176 2,651 Hake

.do...
667

40 2,523
379 4,078

161 9,376 1,076 606 742 Haddock 191 81 11 181 60 30 303 371 1,036 90

42 Pollock

.do..
208 6 81 110 40 250

327 487 400 Cusk.

.do...
32
100

431 50 60

1,978

3, 305

.do..

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154,002

Mackerel.

barrels..

33,818 Mackerel, Boston fleet,

||36, 761 84, 213 167, 444

J73,653

105, 730 196, 493 barrels 49, 413

61,850 109,669

204, 929 Herrings

barrels.. 26, 146 30,698 56, 814 Alewives..

26, 192 29, 310 55, 802 12,420 ..do.... 795

44,906 • 56, 998 5, 727 6,522

1,351 Salmon

5, 682 7,033 do....

2, 184 145

8,104 10, 288 5,868 6,013 560 Trout

2,332 2,892 980 do..

1, 997 1, 437

2,977 1,437

698 698 Herring, smoked ... boxes.. 291, 473 168, 876 460, 349 262, 482 118, 115 443,597 337, 830 274, 592

1,147 1,147 Bloaters, smoked. .do.... 23,077

612, 112 23, 077

20, 603 Cod

20,603 29,619 ..quintals.. 128,912 21,989 130,901 124, 338

810 30, 429 Hake

30, 151 163, 489 125, 450 .do.... 27,069

56,852 182, 302 6,610 33, 679 32, 222 Haddock

8,810 41,032 do..

41, 021 7,901

48, 9222 9, 155 9:22 10, 077 9, 172 976 Pollock ..do....

10, 148 5, 792 1,631 7, 423 1,398 3, 437 5, 035 1,523 Cusk

4,285 .do....

1,773 2, 059

3, 020 212

4, 793 2, 271 1,362 187 Shad

1,649

1,469 38
.burrels..
3,012

1, 507 3,012 Boneless fish.

1,975 1,975
.boxes..
5,915

1, 152 5, 915 9,616 54 9,700 14,233 316 14, 606

2,762

1, 152

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Report of some of the high linersof the New England mackerel and codfish fleets, season

1883.

MACKEREL VESSELS.

Schooners.

Fresh.

Pickled.

Stock.

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Edward E. Webster, Gloucester.
Nellie N. Rowe, Gloucester
Volunteer
Wm. M. Gafferey, Gloucester..
Leona
Abbie M. Deering, Portland, Me
Fannie A. Spurling, Portland, Me.
Elsie M. Smith, Portland, Me
Elizabeth W. Sunith, Portland, Me
Ellen W. Sawyer, Portland, Me
Neponset, Boston.
C.H. Kelley, Boston
M. B. Tower, Boston...
Mertie & Delmar, South Chatham
Willie Irving, South Chatham.
Alice, Provincetown....
Hattie D. Linnell, Provincetown
A. E. Herrick, Swans Island, Me
Maud M. Storey, Rockport...
Mary E. Whorf, Wellfleet
Lottie Hopkins, North Haven, Me
H. D. Perkins, North Haven, Me
Roger Williams, North Haven, Me..
Amy Wixon, North Haven, Me
Alice Fox, North Haven, Me
Sea Foam, North Haven, Me.
Willie Parkman, North Haven, Me
Oasis, North Haven, Me...
F.H. Smith, North Haven, Me
Maud S., North Haven, Me
Eben Dale, North Haven, Me
Louis & Rosie, Boothbay, Me.
Cynosure, Boothbay, Me

Barrels. 2, 1601 $25, 700.00

124,700.00

12,000.00 112,000.00

115,000.00 1,200 13, 892.00

909 13, 315.00

991 10, 261.00 1,044 9,376.00

9,000.00 1,600 111,500.00 1,200 8,000.00 906 7, 260.00

14,300.00 10,400.00 212,000.00

2 10,300.00 1, 2,10 12,380.00

9,000.00

8,100.00 1,060 8,500.00

762 6,200.00 610 6,000.00 810 7,000.00

800 6,800.00 1,050 7,300.00

900 7, 800,00

890 8,600.00 1,040 7,700.00

8,200.00 720 7,200.00

500

950

COD FISH VESSELS.

Schooner.

13,551.50 900 8,000.00

One fare.

Schooner.

One fare.

Lizzie W. Matheson, Provincetown
Willie McKay, Provincetown
Leon Swift, Provincetown
John A. Matheson, Provincetown..
Laurence A. McKenzie, Provincetown
L.A. Grout, Provincetown
Lizzie Colby, Provincetown..
Jennie T. Matheson, Provincetown

Quintals.

4,300
4, 100
3,300
3,300
3.300)
3, 800
3, 200
3,000

Edith McIntire, Provincetown
Carrie W. Clark, Provincetown
Nellie Swift, Provincetown...
Mary Matheson, Provincetown.
William Matheson, Provincetown..
G. W. Bentley, Province'own..
H. M. Simmons, l'rovincetown.
N. E. Symonds, Bucksport, Me

Quintals.

3,000 2, 800 2,800 2, 400 2,500 2, 400 2,600 2,900

1 Net.

& Gross.

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