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Receipts of fish by Boston dealers from foreign and domestic portsContinued.

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1, 486

Mackerel .barrels.. 6,049 2, 233 130 2,675 6, 900 8,027 6,620 9,056 3,966 2,363 3,213 2,972 Mackerel, Boston fleet, inspected

......barrels.. Herrings:

Pickled. ..do... 624 3, 808 25 7,003 188 10,287 2,681 9,972 811 3, 223 417| 2, 816 Frozen do.

291 400 Salmon. .do... 70 42 235 604 282 252 198 62 332 295

58 Alewives: Pickled. ..do...

605 3, 659
1, 408 37 312

2,079

3 153 898 Smoked .do...

56 Trout..

..do. Shad .do..

14 278
705 12 98

18

42 Herring, smoked..boxes.. 11, 081 34, 789 6,650 42, 212 27,665 48,544 29,793 12, 219 38, 44663, 339 22, 550 36,872 Bloaters ..do...

50 951

3, 899

118 6,596 699 Boneless fish. ..do.. 501

916

2,318
114 851 46 1,423

870 Mackerel, canned ...do.

2,061

51 1,377

815 188 844 946 210 Lobsters, canned ....do.. 13, 429 594 7,022

4,819
2, 766
2,617

711 Salmon, canned .do...

825

500 Chams, canned.. do.. 13, 429

916 Codfish .quintals. . 3, 290 3,719 5,398 5,378 8, 129 10,919 17,012 16,667 13, 869 6,788 11,387 974 Hake

do... 3, 492 66 1,740 51 8,786 2,090 2,922 4,961 7,042 2, 238 2,139 Haddock do... 115

242 384 424 300 430 727 439 476 125 Pollock.. .do.. SO 242 69 932 17 462

374 125

30 Cusk.

205 15 59
100 39 25 50 787

250

4,331

223

40

25

.do..

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Large catches and stocks by the New England mackerel fleet off the United States coast, Large catches and stocks by the New England mackerel fleet off the United States coast,

season of 1882.

Schooners.

Fresh, Cured. Net stock.

Barrels. Barrels.
3. 922 2, 476

Over.

Edward E. Webster, Gloucester.
Nellie N. Rowe, Gloucester
Carl Schurz, Gloucester
Col. J. H. French, Gloucester.
John D. Long, Gloucester.
Helen M. Crosby, Gloucester
Golden Hind, Gloucester
John S. McQuin, Gloucester
George Perkins, Gloucester.
Neponset, Boston .....
W. D. Daisley, Boston, gross stock.

$34, 329.00
30,000.00
25,000.00
20,000.00
18,500.00
18, 020.00
16, 323.00
16, 035.57
16,500.00
15, 200.00
15, 600.00

2, 450

season of 1882-Continued.

Schooners.

Fresh. Cured. Net stock.

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Longwood, Boston, gross stock
Alice, Truro,gross stock.
Fannie A. Spurling, Portland, gross stock
Elizabeth W. Smith, Portland, gross stock.
Titmouse, Portland, gross stock
H.S. Rowe, Portland, gross stock
H. E. Williard, Portland, grosg stock
E. K. Dresser, Portland, gross stock
Eddie Pierce, Portland, gross stock.
Louis and Rosa, Booth Bay,gross stock.
Charles R. Washington, Wellneet, gross stock
Mertie and Delmar, South Chatham, gross stock
John M. Fisk, Provincetown, gross stock
Lizzie Thompson, Newburyport, gross stock.
Maud M. Story, Rockport, gross stock.
Dictator, Harwich, gross stock...
Ida C. Spofford, Boston, gross stock.
Willie K. Parkman, North Haven, Me
Cora E. Smith, North Haven, Me
Bartie Pierce, North Haven, Me..
Sea Foam, North Haven, Me
Alice C. Fox, North Haven, Me.
Oasis, North Haven, Me
Roger Williams, North Haven, Me
Lottie E. Hopkins, North Haven, Me
Eben Dale, North Haven, Me.
Henry Nickerson, North Haven, Me.
David Brown, jr., North Haven, Me

2, 210
1,977
2,086
1,283
1,000
1, 2,0
1,000)
1,200
2,013
1, 846
1, 800
1. S00
1.100
1,500
1, 100
1, 100
1,200
1,080
1,200

$14, 700.00

14,800.00 21,581.00 17,500.00 13, 073, 00 11,674.00 14, 801.16 12,318. 82 23,000.00 16,025,00 13, 775.31 19, 164,37 9,511.00 8,000.00 8,000.00 7,000.00 7, 101.98 14,500.00 13,500.00 11,600.00 11,100.00 10,500.00 10, 100.00 10,00.00 9,500.00 9,500.00 8,000.00 7,000.00

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136, 761 105, 730) 196, 493

Mackerel.
.bbls.. 31,881 78, 689 3143, 028

(33,818 84,213
Mackerel, Boston fleet do.... 32, 458

119, 413 167, 144

194,002 Herring..

do. 22,810 42, 300 65, 110 26,146 30,698 56,88 126, 192 29, 31055, 802 Alewives.

.do... 4,014 3,117

7, 131

795 5,727 Salmon

6,52 1,351 5,642 .do.

7,033 3,906 3,906

145

5,868 6,013 500 Trout

2, 3:32 2,892 do. 203 203 1, 437 1, 437

698 698 Herring, smoked ..boxes. . 214,715 171,508 386, 223 291, 473 168, 876 460, 319 262, 482 118, 115 443, 597 Blonters, smoked

..do...
17,629
17,629 23,077

23, 077 20, 603
Cod

20, 603 .quintals.. 174,621 9,034 183, 658 128,912 21,989 150, 901 124, 338 30, 151 163, 489 Hake

.do. 45, 700 10, 973 56,673 27,069 Haddock

6,610 33, 679 32, 222

8,810

41, 032 .do. 9,683 1,683 11,363 9, 155 92 10, 077 Pollock

9, 172 976 10, 148 ..do..

2,601 2,247 4,8-18 1.598 3, 437 5,035 Cusk.

1,523 2,762 .do...

4,285 2,917

2,917 2, 059 212 2,271 1,362 187 Shad

1,519 bbls..

1,192

1. 192 Boneless fish.

3,012 3,042 boxes..

1,975 1,975 3,0151 3,015 5,915

5,915 9,616 51 9,700

1881,

1882.

Fish.

Domes- For-
tic re- eign re- Total.
ceipts. ceipts.

Domes For-
tic re- eign re- Total.
ceipts. ceipts.

Mackerel
Mackerel, Boston fleet.
Herring
Alewives
Salmon.
Trout.
Herring, smoked.
Blouters, smoked
Cod.
Hake
Huddock
Pollock.
(usk
Shad.
Boneless fish

bbls.. 73, 653 61,850

44, 186 37,616 .do....

|161,977 The fishing industry of the Atlantic and Pacific coasts and the Great Lakes. Most of the following notes and all the statistics have been taken from the advance bulletins of the United States Census Reports for 1880. They were collected under the superintendence of Prof. Spencer F. Baird, United States Commissioner of Fisheries, and Prof. G. Brown Goode, by the following special agents: For the Atlantic coast and Lakes, R. E. Earll, J. W. Collins, A. Howard Clark, Fred. Mather, N. E. Atwood, F. W. True, Ernest Ingersoll, Col. Marshall McDonald, W. A. Wilcox; for the Pacific coast, by Prof. D. S. Jordan, James G. Swan, and Dr. T. H. Bean.

201, 929 69, 669

183, 175 do... 12, 420 44,906 56, 998 10,578 41,978 52, 556 .do....

2,184 8, 101 10, 288 1, 129 9, 099 10, 828 .do...

980 1,997 2, 977 2,14 1,690 3, 34 .do... 1,147 1, 147

1,815 1,845 .boxes.. 337,8301 274, 592 612, 412 259, 799 449, 080 708, 879

.do.. 29,619 810 30, 129 30,551 5,060 35,617 .quintals.. 125, 450 56,852 182, 302 89, 297 50,578 139, 875 do...

41, 021 7,901 48, 922 29, 625 9, 134 39, 059 do... 5,792 1,631 7, 123

2, 288 1,981 4, 209 do.. 1,773 3,020 4, 793 956

2,120 3, 076 .do. 1, 469 38 1,507 1,594 101 1,698 .bbls.. 1, 152 1,152 26 1,2415

1,271 boxes..

14, 293 316 14,606 11,333 197 11,630

THE FISHERIES OF MAINE.

It is found that, if the oyster industry be neglected, Maine ranks second only to Massachusetts in the extent and value of her sea fisheries. If the weight of the products alone is considered, the six principal species, placed in the order of their importance, are as follows:

Pounds. Cod ...

56, 004, 325 Herring

34, 695, 192 Mackerel

31, 694, 455 Hake.

24, 447, 730 Haddock

17,728, 735 Lobster..

14, 334, 182 If, however, the money value is considered, the relative importance of the species is somewhat different. The following arrangement represents the fisheries according to their value: Herring fishery (including the sardine industry).

$1,013, 722 Mackerel fishery

659, 304 Cod fishery

656, 753 Lobster fishery.

412, 076 Hake fishery.

278, 336 Haddock fishery

225, 393 The statistics are intended to represent the fishing interests for 1880. The first lobsters ever canned within the limits of the United States were put up in Eastport, in 1842, and, with the exception of a limited business in Boston at various times, Maine has always had a monopoly of the industry for the entire country. In 1880 none were canned outside of the State, and the table, therefore, shows the extent of the business for the United States. The entire lobster catch of Maine for the year is found to be 14,234,182 pounds, of which 4,739,898 pounds were sold fresh, and 9,494,284 pounds were put up by the 23 canneries located in diiferent parts of the State. Several of these canneries were owned by Boston capitalists, but the great majority belonged to Portland dealers, who, in addition to their home interests, operated 17 canneries in the British Provinces. During the same season, according to the statistics furnished by them, they bought 10,588,578 pounds of live lobsters from the Provincial fishermen, from which they put up 2,198,024 cans of the various brands.

The sardine industry is peculiar to Maine. In fact, if we except the menhaden, put up in New Jersey several years ago, under the name of “shadines,” and “clubfish," the industry was, up to 1880, confined exclusively to the village of Eastport. Though experiments were made in the preparation of herring as sardines as early as 1866, the business did not practically begin till 1875, since which time with remarkable rapidity. In 1880, as shown by the tables, it furnished employment to over, 1,500 fishermen and factory hands, in addition to 376 fishermen belonging to New Brunswick, and the value of the products amounted to nearly $825,000.

has grown

NEW HAMPSHIRE.

Portsmouth, the only seaport of the State, in foriner years was quite largely interested in the fisheries, as producer, as well as having a large domestic and export trade. Of late years, in common with many other of the oldest settlements, the business has mostly moved to neighboring ports, and is limited to supplying the near home demand for fresh fish.

MASSACHUSETTS.

From the early settlement of the State to the present time Massachusetts has led all others in capital, products, and number of employees engaged in the fishing industry, 20,117 people being actively engaged in the numerous branches; 5,000 additional

are engaged in the manufacture of nets, lines, fish boxes, cooperage, building of fishing crafts. Including the families of fishermen and others dependent on the fisheries, at least 100,000 persons are supported from this industry.

The total value of the products for 1880 were, for fish alone, $5,054,900; shell fish, fish oil, and guano, $997,512; whale fishery, $2,089,337; total, $8,141,750.

The total weights of fish caught that year amounted to 341,935,982 pounds, exclusive of any shellfish.

The years 1881 and 1882 have been far more prosperous than the one above mentioned, and would show large gains in products as well as vessel tonnage. About 75,000,000 pounds of ice and 70,000,000 pounds of salt are annually used in the fisheries of the State.

RHODE ISLAND.

The fishing industry of this State is chiefly confined to oysters and its menhaden oil fisheries, with less attention paid to food fish. Total value of products, $880,915.

CONNECTICUT.

The value of the products for 1880 were as follows: Oysters, $710,875; fertilizers, $407,604; food fish, $338,387; total, $1,456,866.

THE FISHERIES OF NEW YORK.

New York takes an important part in the fisheries, coming fourth in the list of fishproducing States, with products valued at $4,380,565. In several special branches she holds a still more prominent position. Her men haden fisheries are more extensive than those of any other State, and in 1880 the value of the oil, scrap, and compost reached $1,114,158, being more than half of the yield for the entire country. The value of the products of the oyster fisheries for the same period reached $1,577,050, which is greater than that for any of the other States, except Maryland, Virginia, and New Jersey. The New York fishermen secure annually larger quantities of both hard and soft clams than those of any other State; in 1880 the amount realized from the sale of these two species was $517,691. In the shad fisheries she ranks third on the list, the catch in 1880 reaching 2,733,600 pounds.

THE FISHERIES OF NEW JERSEY.

New Jersey produced in 1880 $3,176,589 worth of fishery products, taking the sixth place in the list of fish-producing States. In some of the special fisheries it takes a higher rank. Its oyster products, valued at $2,080,625, are exceeded only by those of Maryland and of Virginia. Its crab fisheries, from which the fisherinen realize $162,612, are more extensive than those of any other State, while its quahaug (hard clam) fisheries are second only to those of New York. In the menhaden fisheries it stands fifth on the list, the oil, scrap, and compost produced in 1880 being valued at $146,286. Its river fisheries are of minor importance, the total yield being only 2,752,000 pounds, netting the tishermen $91,435.

THE FISHERIES OF PENNSYLVANIA.

Pennsylvania, though consuming large quantities of fishery products, has no important fishing-grounds within its borders. The principal business connected with the fisheries is the oyster industry, for, though no oysters are produced in the waters of the State, a large number of persons are engaged in transporting oysters from the southern beds to Philadelphia, and others make a business of receiving, shelling, and packing them for shipment. From this industry $187,500 is realized by the residents of the State. The sea fishing is confined to the capture of sea bass and other species by a fleet of eight vessels that make occasional trips to the fishing-grounds off Cape Henlopen during the summer months. Shad, sturgeon, and other less important species are taken in small quantities in the Delaware and Susquehanna rivers, and lake fish of different kinds are caught along the shores bordering Lake Erie.

THE FISHERIES OF DELAWARE. The oyster industry, valued at $687,725, constitutes the principal fishery business of Delaware, over two-thirds of the money realized by the fishermen being derived from the capture and sale of this species. The other fishery interests of the State are very limited, being largely contined to the capture of salt-water species in the bays and sounds along the outer shore, and to the net-fishing for shad, sturgeon, and other species in Delaware River and its numerous tributaries.

THE FISHERIES OF THE SOUTHERN ATLANTIC STATES.

Probably no portion of the entire coast is so bountifully supplied with valuable foodfish and other edible species as are the sounds and bays of our Southern Atlantic States. Fully three times as many persons are at present engaged in the fisheries of the district under consideration as in 1870, and the value of the products has more than quadrupled during the same period; yet the fact remains that in many localities, especially in the portion south of Albemarle Sound, North Carolina, the fisheries are practically undeveloped, and the people, as a rule, have little idea of the abundance of fish in the waters along their shores. There are many obstacles in the way of any. extensive fishing business, such as the difficulty of procuring ice and the absence of proper shipping facilities; but there seems little doubt that when the people come to realize the importance of their fishing interests these difficulties will be overcome, and many will find tishing a remunerative employment. In certain localities--as at Beaufort, Wilmington, and Charleston-a large business has sprung up, with profit to all concerned, but even here the industry is capable of much further development.

THE FISHERIES OF MARYLAND.

If the sea fisheries proper be ken as a standard, Maryland has an unimportant place among the fish-producing States; but if the oyster and river fisheries be included, in both of which she is extensively interested, she ranks second only to Massachusetts in the value of the products, and stands tirst on the list in the number of persons employed. Her 26,008 persons employed as fishermen and shoresmen produced in 1880 $5,221,715 worth of fishery products, while the 20,117 persons interested in the Massachusetts fisheries realized $8,141,750 as the result of their labors. This is easily explained by the fact that the fishing season is much shorter in the former than in the latter State, and that the fishermen are, as a rule, less energetic and less fully equipped for the work. Her oyster interests are more important than those of any other State, these, according to the report of Mr. R. II. Elmonds, furnishing employment to 23,402 persons, with 1,450 vessels and 1,825 boats, the value of the products amounting to $4,730,476. With so extensive a river system it is natural to suppose that her freshwater fisheries would be of peculiar importance, and such is indeed the case, for more shad are taken by her fishermen than by those of any other State, while she stands second only to North Carolina in the extent and value of her alewife (called berring) fisheries.

THE FISHERIES OF VIRGINIA.

Virginia comes seventh on the list of fish-producing States, the oyster, menhaden, and shall fisheries being the three branches in which her citizens are most extensively interested. In the first-named fishery she ranks second only to Maryland, having 16,315 persons employed, with products valued at $2,218,376. Her menhaden fisheries are of recent origin, but they have developed with remarkable rapidity. In 1880 the fleet numbered 102 sail, and the oil, scrap, and compost produced sold for $303,829, 88,213,800 pounds of menhaden being utilized in this way. The river fisheries are also important, furnishing employment to 2,6+1 persons, and over 3,000,000 pounds of shad and nearly 7,000,000 pounds of alewives (locally known as herring), with many other river species, were taken, the whole having a value of $272,828.

THE FISHERIES OF NORTH CAROLINA.

The large rivers and brackish sounds of North Carolina are visited annually by immense numbers of shad and alewives (commonly called herring), and in spring and early summer the fishing is extensive in many portions of the State. The principal fisheries, however, are near the junction of the Roanoke and Chowan rivers, at the head of Albemarle Sound, and in the Neuse and the Tar rivers. In the alewife tisheries the State ranks tirst on the list, with 15,520,000 pounds, netting the fishermen $142,874. The quantity of shad taken in 1880 was 3,221,263 pounds, being a little below the Maryland catch, but the price realized is so much greater that the value of the catch is more than double that for the Maryland fishery.' Its sea fisheries, when compared with those of the more northern States, are of little importance, though in the bays and sounds between Beaufort and Wilmington many follow tishing for a livelihool, and secure annually large quantities of the various species. The mullet fisheries of North Carolina are second only to those of Florida, the catch in 1880 amounting to 3,368,000 pounds, valued at $80,500.

This is owing to the fact that most of the shad are marketed before the fishing in the more northern waters becomes extensive.-M. McDONALD.

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