Lapas attēli
PDF
ePub
[blocks in formation]

Massachusetts catch of mackerel for seventy-eight years, 1804–1881.

[blocks in formation]
[ocr errors]

1825. 1826. 1827. 1828. 1829. 1830. 1831 1832. 1833. 1834. 1835 1836. 1837. 1838. 1839. 1810. 1841. 1812. 1813. 1844. 1815. 1816. 1817. 1818. 1819. 1850. 1851. 1852. 1853. 183. 185. 1856. 1807 1858. 1859. 1800. 1861 12. 183. 18:4. 1865. 1866.

29, 637
43, 499
81,357
63, 235
54, 184
47,892
70, 198
28, 678
51,559
80, 434
48,217
56, 311
31, 306
37, 968
22, 191
19, 350
23, 747
29, 363
32, 759
28, 843
128, 086
149, 338
104, 150
20, 459
69, 300
88, 401
90, 763
92, 617
49, 010
30,095
29, 487
89,032
91, 917
75, 347
51, 330
58, 828
70, 877
81,902
67,985
103, 383
153, 723
150, 322

109, 840
80,584
69, 341
110, 666
106, 471
104, 569
171, 296
97, 220
98, 925
93,553
57, 271
60,558
61, 027
28, 588
22,037
11,049
10, 241
22, 496
13, 088
22,515
85,696
73, 403
76, 007
88,466
94, 847
44,909
102, 467
73, 793
21,583
46, 242
91, 0:25
76, 819
49, 775
21, 929
12, 160
122, 837
100, 286

114,904
35,657
39, 612
63,423
65, 222
156, 024
142, 164
96,551
69, 412
78,897
91, 923
60, 187
52, 558
44, 184
30,015
20,091
21, 149
23, 684
18, 604
34,823
88, 520
65, 520
71, 760
108, 176
67, 709
87,604
135, 597
47,966
39, 987
55, 133

9,000
47,988
49, 962
32, 333
22, 207
59,578
22, 485
100, 011
102, 601
23, 212
35, 266
44, 481

254, 381 158, 740 190,310 237, 324 225, 877 308, 485 382, 658 2:2, 151 222, 926 252, 881 197, 411 177,056 144,891 110, 740 74,243 50, 490 55, 137 75,513 64, 451 86, 181 202, 302 188, 261 251, 917 317, 101 231, 856 242, 572 329, 111 217,3340 130, 132 134, 848 130,850 214, 017 192, 378 131, 601

[blocks in formation]

78, 388 136, 075 137, 746 63,562 36,318

89, 845 244, 703 194, 281 260, 863 306, 941 273, 355 252, 775 231, 390

724 1,992 4,148 3,460

633 562 280

14 224 269

Massachusetts catch of mackerel for seventy-right years, 1804-1881Continued.

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

Eighth ANNUAL REPORT OF THE BOSTON Fish BUREAU, JANUARY, 1883.

REPORT.

OFFICE OF BOSTON Fish BUREAU,

Boston, January 1, 1883. In presenting our eighth annual report we take pleasure in once more reporting the fishing industry of New England in a more flourishing condition than for many years. The season just closed has been a successful and prosperous one to the producer, and a steady, healthy demand with no failures of note bas given the dealers no cause for complaint. The leading varieties of fish, with the regularity of the seasons, appeared large bodies, each giving promise of more than an average catch. As the season advanced the catch, from numerous causes, fell off much from general expectation, yet meeting the demands of the trade and holding prices firm all the season. The dark side of the business must yearly be noticed. The losses of life and property the past year have been, with the exception of 1876 and 1879, the largest for many years. Seventeen vessels and 117 men have been lost during the year, all of which were in the cod or ground fishery, and nearly all from the single port of Gloucester; not any vessels or lives were lost in the mackerel fishery. Larger stocks have been made the past season than ever before known. We notice specially only two engaged in the mackerel catch; schooner Eduard E. Webster, Capt. Soloman Jacobs, of Gloucester, sailed March 11, and hauled up November 11, just eight months engaged; her catch realized, gross, $39,750, or net $34,329; she carried a crew of 17 men. The stock of this vessel for the two previous years in the mackerel fishery was in 1880, $19,850; 1881, $26,950. The schooner Nellie N. Roue, of the same port, made a stock the past year nearly if not quite as large; we regret not having the exact amount.

Our table of large stocks in the mackerel fishery mention over thirty others who have realized what would have been considered small fortunes not many years ago. The list might be extended to greater length; suffice to say, all done well.

Many vessels in the cod and halibut fishery also have large records. We only notice a few of them. Schooner Grace L. Sears, of Gloucester, from December 31, 1881, to December 4, 1882, stocked in the halibut fishery, net, $26,426.81; the crew of 14 men shared $916.11 each. Schooner II. B. (riflin, of the same port, caught 400,000 pounds of cod on the Banks, the largest single fare reported from that port. Schooner Willie Mckay, of Provincetown, 436,800 pounds of codfish, stock about $19,000 for a single voyage. Many other vessels from the last port arrived home from the Banks with 250,000 to 300,000 pounds of cod each, realizing from $12,000 to $16,000 each.

With the success of the past two seasons it is not surprising that great confidence is felt in the future of the New England fisheries.

With present appliances for the catch not as many vessels are needed as in days of drailing and hand-line fishing, yet the cod and mackerel fleets have been largely increased and many more new vessels will be finished in time for the coming season's business. During the past year 81 vessels have been built for the fishing fleets. Yearly more attention appears to be given to the fishing business as one of the important industries of the country, and with the growth annually the demand increases for the products of the fisheries. The nation is largely indebted to Prof.

a

Spencer F. Baird, Commissioner of United States Fisheries, for both the scientific knowledge and practical application of the propagation of the various food fishes of the United States, by which assurances are given that the steady growing demands of the country may be met. Through the reports of his field agents, made in the interest of the United States Census and Fish Commission, we, for the first time, have the opportunity of knowing the size and importance of the industry. As a matter of interest we have given the aggregate reports, which do not include the Gulf States or the large rivers of the interior. On pages 30 to 33 will be found the names of the leading fish taken south of New York and the catch for 1880. As so little is known of the fisheries in those waters we give the list entire.

Mackerel. - The total catch by the New England fleet amounted to 378,853 inspected barrels; of this 258,717 barrels are credited to Massachusetts. This amount has been exceeded but eight times during the past fifty years. The early fleet sailed from home ports in March, more vessels going Soutń than for many years. The schooner Nellie N. Roue took the first fare on March 31; the fish were of mixed sizes. First catch in 1881 was March 22. The first mackerel taken in the weirs at Cape Cod, April 20; previous year, on May 4. The first fare of salt mackerel direct from the fishing grounds arrived at Boston on May 4; in 1881, May 9. The fish were found quite plenty, and worked north slowly. The vessels that made an early start were more successful than for a number of years.

The season's catch is noticeable as having been of larger size and poorer quality than the previous year. As the season advanced the fish did not improve as usual, the fall catch being inferior to that of midsummer. The schooner Yankee Lass, of Boston, was the only vessel from the United States that fished in provincial waters; she returned with 275 barrels.

The catch by the provincial fishermen was the smallest for years, and accounts for the large decrease in the amount imported at this port. Prices have held firm, with an upward tendency from the first of the season, and much higher than the previous year, selling uninspected in June at $4; July, $6 to $7; August, $8 to $9; inspected selling in August, $6, $9, $12; September, $7, $10, $13; and in October and later, at $8, $11, $14, for No. 1's, 2's, and 3’s. During September the catch rapidly fell off, with few fish caught in October, and the fleet early gave it up. Although the total catch was extra large, a steady demand prevented any large accumulation; only a small amount remained on hand at the close of the year.

Codfish.—The total catch of cured fish by the New England fleet was 663,564 quintals of codfish, and 235,340 quintals of bake, haddock, pollock, and cusk; total of 898,904 quintals. The Grand Bank fleet, with few exceptions, made but one trip, returning with full fares. The catch of cod on Georges Banks and off the New England shore was less than the average. Hake have been more plenty than for many years. The shore catch of herring was much under the average.

Box herring.-Have been in larger receipt than any year that we have a record of; a steady demand has called for them on arrival and no amount of stock remains on hand.

Canned fish. During the past few years this comparatively new branch of the business has grown to large size and importance.

In former years fresh fish often arrived on the market largely in excess of the demand, and had to be sold for almost nothing or thrown away; often the latter. Now the canners are always ready to take the catch at good prices, thereby adding thousands of dollars to the receipts of the fishermen as well as giving employment to a large number of hands on shore. As far back as 1844 fresh fish were canned in Boston, but only to a very limited extent up to 1880, since which time the amount canned is only limited by the supply of fish. The favor which it meets on the market speaks for itself, when, for self-protection, Boston firms in taking orders have been obliged to adopt the rule on receiving them, only, “subject to the pack,” which in turn is subject to the abundance of the catch. The packing of American sardines may date from Eastport, Me, in 1876, in which year 4,000 cases were packed, mostly quarter cans packed in oil, 100 cans in a case. "Yearly the business has grown until in 1881, fifteen factories at Eastport and three at Lubec packed 190,000 cases, three-fourths of which were quarter boxes packed in oil, 100 cans in a case; one-eighth half cans in mustard, 50 cans in a case; one-eighth spiced sardines and sea trout. The past season, owing to the scarcity of fish, only 125,000 cases were packed, giving employment to 500 men and 700 boys and girls in addition to the fishermen engaged in providing the catch.

The foreign export trade has been smaller than for many years, especially the trade with Haiti, severe sickness in that island and the low prices prevailing here for coffee and logwood combining to produce this result. The smallness of this branch of trade, however, has not been felt by the dealers, owing to the unusually large home demand. Other branches of the trade are without special note.

a

During the past year the Boston market has, at nearly all times, been able to supply the country with everything in the way of salt-water fish, be it cured, canned, or fresh, and, as it is the only city that can do this, it continues to hold its old-time prestige as a distributing point, both for domestic and imported fish. This fact is fully appreciated by the trade, as shown by the large receipts and the small amount of stock on hand at the close of the past year.

The new year opens with a small amount of stock on hand and an improved financial condition of both producer and dealer as the result of the year's business, thus giving renewed hope and encouragement to all interested in this important branch of the New England industries. We trust the day is far remote when less can be said for its prosperity.

W. A. Wilcox, Secretary.

New England fleet, catch of cod and other ground fish, landed at home ports, as reported

by the Boston Fish Bureau.

[blocks in formation]

Total New England fleet:

1882.

315 268

1881.......

377
336

692
604

7,719

474, 078
355, 6-10

6, 402

424.826
419, 387

898, 904
775, 027

1 Part of catch landed at other than bome port.
2 Includes North Bay catch, by 14 sail, 9,960 quintals.
8 Includes North Bay catch, by 1 sail, 350 quintals.
4 Halibut fleet included in vessels, catch 7,750,685 pounds; amount landed includes vessels from
other ports.

3 Catch of small boats included.
6 150 small sail and boats; total men fishing, 500.
7 Includes receipts from vessels of other ports.
8 Includes New Harbor, Browns Cove, and Monhegan, 50 small sail.

New England mackerel catch--amount of inspected barrels packed at home ports, and south

ern catch, as reported to the Boston Fish Bureau.

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][subsumed][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][subsumed][merged small][merged small][merged small][subsumed][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

The southern fleet united with the shore fleet after the early catch, making the total shore fleet 312 sail.

Many vessels packed from other ports included.
2 Many vessels packed away from home ports.

Weir catch, 769 barrels cured; 2,065 barrels fresh; 43 men.
4 All vessels packed away from home port.

7

Receipts of fish by Boston dealers from foreign and domestic ports.

January. February. March. April. May.

June.

[blocks in formation]

75

Mackerel .barrels.. 6991 386
860 723 1,403 1,086 894 379

211 466 7,506
Mackerel, Boston fleet, in-
spected

.barrels..
Herrings:

Pickled. .do.... 6031 696) 61 1,281 1,581 1,642 1,660 252 1,722 79 905 886
Frozen

.do... 6,210 1,563 4,666 4,855 6,413 678 1,130 155
Salmon
do.... 100 105 81 267 160

245

80

301 5 Alewives: Pickled. .do....

84

130 14

62 120 1,261 Smoked .do..

351
Trout..
do...

359
Shad.

do...
95

9
Herring, smoked ..boxes.. 3,725 20,400 38, 195 25, 282 7,747 36, 151 30, 826 39, 399 10,659 12, 143 32, 462 77, 730
Bloaters, smoked ...do.... 5,758 661 4,194 1,322 9,083 1,778 80 538
Boneless fish .do. 148

641
656 37 7601

801

1,445 Mackerel, canned ..do. Lobsters, canned ...do.

256

100

1,712 420 1, 360 Salmon, canned ....do..

1, 150
Clams, canned. do.
Codtish ..quintals.. 3,742 536 6,323 21 3,504 984 3,993 650 4,925 873 7,695 3,073
Наkе.
do.... 1,974

140
456

25
Haddock
do...

50

25 32

431 30
Pollock
.do....

35
50 50

355 30
Cusk.
do....

168

200

« iepriekšējāTurpināt »