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daggers, pistols, revolvers, fowling pieces, cartridges; caps, felt and straw hats for men or women; umbrellas, parasols, of pure silk or mixed; broadcloth, cassimere, merino; muslin; flannel, and all fabrics of pure wool or mixed with cotton, not specitied in the other classes; saddles.

Ninth class, duty 80 cents per pound.Clerical and church ornaments; cigarettes; artificial flowers; laces, ribbons, cords, stockings, gloves, &c., made of pure linen or mixed; linen dress goods, woolen shawls and shirts; fur, silk, and Panama hats; neckties of cotton, linen or wool; curtains and mosquito bars of cotton or linen.

Tenth class, duty $1.50 per pound.Fans with ivory handles; ornaments and net work for the head; billiard balls; human hair and its imitations; kid gloves; jewelry and watches of all kinds; silk goods, goods made of silk mixed with cotton or linen, not specified in other classes.

The following articles are prohibited, unless introduced for the use of the Government, viz: Gunpowder, except for mining purposes; muskets, rifles, cannons, and other munitions of war; cigars and tobacco.

The duties are collected on the gross weigbt of all packages of mer. chandise. No tare is allowed for boxes, barrels, crates, &c. It sometimes bappens that the duty on a box amounts to more than that of its contents. Mr. William Melhado, the British consul for Truxillo and the Bay Islands, recently called my attention to a pile of empty boxes, barrels, and crates in his back yard, upon which be assured me that over $3,000 had been paid to the custom-house for duties.

'To the total amount of duties by weight, according to the preceding tariff, the following extras are added, viz:

First. For public roads, 2 per cent.
Second. For the university fund, 2 per cent.

2
Third. For the hospital fund, 2 per cent.
Fourth. For the funded debt, 10 per cent.

Finally, the importer has to pay 30 cents per 100 pounds on the gross weight of his merchandise for storage, whether he uses the Government's warehouse or not.

Tonnage dues and port charges.-Vessels of 100 tons or less pay 50 cents per ton; vessels of 100 to 150 tons pay 37} cents per ton; vessels of 150 tons and over pay 25 cents per ton. For light-house and buoys, 12 cents per ton extra.

Steamships engaged in the fruit trade are exempt from the payment of tonnage and light-house dues. The permit to discharge and receive cargo costs $2; anchorage, $1; clearance, $1.

WM. C. BURCHARD,

Consul. UNITED STATES CONSULATE AT RUATAN AND TRUXILLO,

December 1, 1882.

and towers, material for railroad cars, pumps, printing-presses, type, paper, and other materials for printing; boats and lighters with their oars and sails, iron and lead pipes, wire for fences, live animals, barrels, pipes, and hogsheads, hoops and staves, gunny bags, gold and silver bullion and coin, books, seeds and plants, fertilizers, rice, beans, flour, meal, corn, potatoes, and other vegetables; ice, personal baggage, and household effects of passengers and immigrants; articles introduced for the use of foreign ministers, for the President and members of his Cabinet, and on account of the Government.

Second class, duty 3 cents per pound.—Hard bread and crackers; coffee, sugar, starch, molasses, honey, corn starch; beef, dried, smoked, or salted; pork, bacon; stoves, pots, and all cooking utensils made of iron; axes, spades, shovels, picks, crowbars, chains, anchors; iron sates; let. ter presses; nails, tacks; iron, steel, brass, copper, tin, and ziuc, in bars, rods, or sheets; tar; mineral waters, ginger ale; kerosene and all other oils for fluids or light; common soap; crockery; blank books, pens, pencils, ink; coffee and corn mills; grindstones; paints; epsom and glauber salts; tallow; sole leather; glassware; vinegar.

Third class, 8 cents per pound.-All articles made of iron, steel, tin, brass, or zinc, not specified in other classes; linseed, cod-liver, and almond oils; nuts and dried fruits; spices; lamps, lanterns, chandeliers, chimneys, globes, candlesticks, &c., not plated or gilded; billiard tables, pianos, organs, chairs, sofas, tables, and furniture of all kinds made of wood; paper, either for writing or wrapping; fish, salted, smoked, or dried; wines of all kinds; sperm candles; carpets made of cotton or mixed with wool; mattresses; mirrors; matches; preserved fruits and jellies; tools for carpenters, blacksmiths, and other trades; bams; china and porcelain wares; sails for vessels, rope, and cordage.

Fourth class, duty 16 cents per pound.-Brandy, rum, gin, and other spirits; perfumed soaps and oils; perfumed waters for the toilet; sheetings, shirtings, brown and colored drills, duck and all other cotton fabrics, except prints, lawns, muslins, and other dress goods; cotton and linen tlireal; rubber and gutta percha goods; surgical, mathematical, and musical instruments; toys, baby carriages, baskets, truuks, valises, carpet-bags, needles, pins, fish-hooks, buckles; thimbles, except gold or silver; knives with wood bandles; brooms, wooden buckets.

Fifth class, duty 24 cents per pound.-Ready-made clothing; socks, caps, gloves, and all other knit goods made of cotton; buttons of all kinds, except silk, pearl, gold and silver; penknives, razors, scissors, knives and forks, sheath knives; linen and mixed drills, tablecloths, towels, napkins; artificial fireworks; canes, wbips; umbrellas, parasols of cotton or wool; tanned skins, leather; tea; brushes; photographic instruments and materials.

Sixth class, duty 28 cents per pound.-Drugs, medicines, and chemical preparations; all plated and gilded goods; ready-made ladies' clothing and underwear of cotton; cotton handkerchiefs; essences and extracts; tape, lace, edging, Hamburg, &c., of cotton; wool blaukets; clocks; linen shirtings; prints, calicoes, ginghams, and other similar cotton fabrics; nautical instruments.

Seventh class, duty 36 cents per pound.-Woolen or mixed fabrics, such as table covers, stockings, gloves, caps, half hose, &c.; cotton shirts, lawns, piqué, percales, cambrics, linen hosiery.

Eighth class, duty 50 cents per pound.–Fans, except with ivory handles; spectacles, opera glasses, telescopes; boots and shoes of all kinds; linen shirts; clothing made of wool or linen; knives and forks, plated or gilded; corsets, suspenders, elastics; violin and guitar strings; swords,

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daggers, pistols, revolvers, fowling pieces, cartridges; caps, felt and straw hats for men or women; umbrellas, parasols, of pure silk or mixed; broadcloth, cassimere, merino; muslin; flannel, and all fabrics of pure wool or mixed with cotton, not specified in the other classes; saddles.

Ninth class, duty 80 cents per pound.-Clerical and church ornaments; cigarettes; artificial flowers; laces, ribbons, cords, stockings, gloves, &c., made of pure linen or mixed; linen dress goods, woolen shawls and shirts; fur, silk, and Panama hats; neckties of cotton, linen or wool; curtains and mosquito bars of cotton or linen.

Tenth class, duty $1.50 per pound.-Fans with ivory handles; ornaments and net work for the head; billiard balls; human hair and its imitations; kid gloves; jewelry and watches of all kinds; silk goods, goods made of silk mixed with cotton or linen, not specified in other classes.

The following articles are prohibited, unless introduced for the use of the Government, viz: Gunpowder, except for mining purposes; muskets, rifles, cannons, and other munitions of war; cigars and tobacco.

The duties are collected on the gross weigbt of all packages of mer. chandise. No tare is allowed for boxes, barrels, crates, &c. It sometimes happens that the duty on a box amounts to more than that of its contents. Mr. William Melbado, the British consul for Truxillo and the Bay Islands, recently called my attention to a pile of empty boxes, barrels, and crates in his back yard, upon which he assured me that over $3,000 had been paid to the custom-house for duties.

To the total amount of duties by weight, according to the preceding tariff, the following extras are added, viz:

First. For public roads, 2 per cent.
Second. For the university fund, 2 per cent.
Third. For the hospital fund, 2 per cent.
Fourth. For the funded debt, 10 per cent.

Finally, the importer has to pay 50 cents per 100 pounds on the gross weight of his merchandise for storage, whether he uses the Government's warehouse or not.

Tonnage dues and port charges.-Vessels of 100 tons or less pay 50 cents per ton; vessels of 100 to 150 tons pay 37 cents per ton; vessels of 150 tons and over pay 25 cents per ton. For light-house and buoys, 19 cents per ton extra.

Steamships engaged in the fruit trade are exempt from the payment of tonnage and light-house dues. The permit to discharge and receive cargo costs $2; anchorage, $1; clearance, $1.

WM. C. BURCHARD,

Consul. UNITED STATES CONSULATE AT RUATAN AND TRUXILLO,

December 1, 1882.

VENEZUELA.

THE NEW IMPORT TARIFF OF VENEZUELA.

TRANSMITTED BY CONSUL PLUMACHER, OF MARACAIBO. In connection with the translation of the new Venezuelan import tariff, herewith transmitted, which went into effect July 1 last, I desire to state that, although much labor and careful investigation have been bestowed on rendering it into English, the result can hardly be regarded as entirely satisfactory. In this country, where the Spanish language is, perbaps, more perverted than in any other of the South American Republics, and where an abundance of local expressions are current it is always difficult, and sometimes impossible, to give the exact equivalents in English. Still the translation is as correct as could possibly be made, and will give an accurate general idea of the duties, which in some cases might be almost regarded as prohibitory.

Under allcircumstancesit would be highly advisable for our exporters to have their invoices carefully examined by the Venezuelan consuls before shipping their goods, for, owing to the extremely complicated nature of the tariff, errors might easily be committed, for which no explanations would be received, and which would be considered sufficient cause for confiscation.

E. H. PLUMACHER,

Consul. UNITED STATES CONSULATE,

Maracaibo, September 19, 1881.

IMPORTATION TARIFF OF THE REPUBLIC OF VENEZUELA, TAKING

EFFECT JULY 1, 1881,

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(Translated by Eugene H. Plumacher, United States consul, Maracaibo.] According to the existing Venezuelan tariff all imported articles are divided into nine classes, viz:

Per kilogram. First class .

Free, Second class

$0 02 Third class

05 Fourth class

15 Fifth class.

25 Sixth class

50 Seventh class

1 00 Eighth class.

2 00 Ninth class

4 00 The articles free of importation and also those whose importation is wholly prohibited will be found at the conclusion of the accompanying translation of the tariff,

It will be remembered that in all cases the duties mentioned refer to so much per kilogram, irrespective of value, as there are no ad ralorem rates establisheil.

The duties given in the translation are reduced to United States money, and the letters 11. 0, 8. mean “not otherwise specified.

The goods imported are appraised according to their gro88 weight.

Articles.

Class.

Duty per kilogram.

3 3 3

Acid:

Stearic..
Oleic.
Acetic
Muriatic..
Nitric
Sulphuric
Tartaric, in powder

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$0 05

05 05 05 05 02 25

7

Importation tariff of the Republic of Venezuela, fc.-Continued.

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5 4

Alabaster.
Alembics
Albums..
Alcoholometers
Almonds:

Shelled

Unshelled
Alpaca, woolen or of wool mixed with cotton
Alum, crude
Ammopia, liquid..
Anchors, boat and launch..
Anchors, ships'
Aniseed
Arabias, linen or cotton
Argil.
Apparatus, photographic
Areometers.
Arsenic.
Articles containing gold or silver..
Articles in imitation gold or silver, n. 0. .
Articles of German silver or imitation.
Articles solely for the fabrication of bats
Aspbalt
Adzes
Anvils.
Ashes, wood
Awls
Augers
Accordeons and concertinas
Apples
Bran.
Beneseed
Bonı bazine.
Bitters..
Binoculars containing gold or silver.
Binoculars, n. 0.8
Brimstone
Bagatelle tables with accessories
Billiard tables with accessories.
Balustere, iron....
Balconies, irun......
Buckets, according to material
Barometers
Bars, rough iron
Barrels, pipes, or hogsheads, set up or in parts.
Baize or rateen, in pieces or blankets
Blacking, shoe...
Blacking, n. 0.8
Bridle bits:

Of iron, steel, copper, or brass..

Gilded, plated, or German silver.
Balls, billiard, bone or ivory
Bage:

Money, thread or cotton
Money, silk, pure or mixed.
Traveling
Game..
Paper..
Leather, wine.

Empty, of common hemp, unbleached Oanaburg, &c.
Bottles, common, of ordinary dark or clear glass
Bottle holders
Boats or launches, set up or in parts..
Buttons, silk, gold, or silver....
Buttons, n. 0.8.
Bramant:

Unbleached..

White linen, or linen mixed with cotton....
Brandy
Boxes:

Empty wooden
Iron, money, or safeg.
Small, of brass, steel, iron, or other similar metal.
Sole-leather hat
Paper bat.
Pasteboard, entire or in pieces..

Paint
Boilers:

Iron
Copper

25

15 1 00

05 25 02 05 15 25 02 25 25

25 2 00

50 50 15 02 05 05 02 15 15 25 02 02

15 1 00 1 00 2 00

50 05 15 15 03 05

4
3
3

6

50 02 05 50 15 02

15 50 50

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3

05 16

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