James Madison and the Future of Limited Government

Pirmais vāks
John Curtis Samples, John Samples
Cato Institute, 2002 - 246 lappuses
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The essays in this volume use Madison to engage such contemporary issues as multiculturalism, federalism, the emerging democracies, the scope of international law, and faith-based policy and politics. This book speaks to both the past and present of the American republic.

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Atlasītās lappuses

Saturs

INTRODUCTION
1
Madisons Angels
9
Recapturing Madisons Constitution Federalism without the Blank Check
13
Madisons Constitutional Vision The Legacy of Enumerated Powers
25
The Novelty of James Madisons Constitutionalism
43
The Madisonian Legacy A Jeffersonian Perspective
59
Madison and Multiculturalism Group Representation Group Rights and Constitutionalism
71
Indians in Madisons Constitutional Order
121
James Madison on Religion and Politics
135
James Madison on Religion and Politics Conservative AntiRationalist Libertarian
147
Madison and the Revival of Pure Democracy
165
The Rule of Law and Freedom in Emerging Democracies A Madisonian Perspective
191
Governance beyond the Nation State James Madison on Foreign Policy and Universal Peace
213
CONTRIBUTORS
229
INDEX
233
Autortiesības

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Populāri fragmenti

9. lappuse - But what is government itself but the greatest of all reflections on human nature? If men were angels, no government would be necessary If angels were to govern men, neither external nor internal controls on government would be necessary In framing a government which is to be administered by men over men, the great difficulty lies in this: you must first enable the government to control the governed, and in the next place oblige it to control itself...
118. lappuse - So that however it may be mistaken, the end of law is not to abolish or restrain, but to preserve and enlarge freedom. For ' in all the states of created beings, capable of laws, where there is no law there is no freedom.
122. lappuse - The United States in Congress assembled shall also have the sole and exclusive right and power of regulating the alloy and value of coin struck by their own authority, or by that of the respective States : Fixing the standard of weights and measures throughout the United States : Regulating the trade and managing all affairs with the Indians...
64. lappuse - That the government created by this compact was not made the exclusive or final judge of the extent of the powers delegated to itself; since that would have made its discretion, and not the Constitution, the measure of its powers; but that, as in all other cases of compact among parties having no common judge, each party has an equal right to judge for itself, as well of infractions, as of the mode and measure of redress.
166. lappuse - Hence it is that such democracies have ever been spectacles of turbulence and contention; have ever been found incompatible with personal security or the rights of property, and have in general been as short in their lives as they have been violent in their deaths.
77. lappuse - The aim of every political constitution is, or ought to be, first to obtain for rulers men who possess most wisdom to discern, and most virtue to pursue, the common good of the society...
65. lappuse - ... in case of a deliberate, palpable, and dangerous exercise of other powers, not granted by the said compact, the states, who are parties thereto, have the right, and are in duty bound, to interpose, for arresting the progress of the evil, and for maintaining, within their respective limits, the authorities, rights, and liberties appertaining to them.
72. lappuse - By a faction, I understand a number of citizens, whether amounting to a majority or minority of the whole, who are united and actuated by some common impulse of passion, or of interest, adverse to the rights of other citizens, or to the permanent and aggregate interests of the community.
40. lappuse - They would contain various exceptions to powers not granted, and on this very account would afford a colorable pretext to claim more than were granted; for why declare that things shall not be done which there is no power to do?
54. lappuse - ... the preservation of the general government in its whole constitutional vigor, as the sheet anchor of our peace at home, and safety abroad: a jealous care of the right of election by the people...

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