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THE rich man's son inherits lands,
And piles of brick, and stone, and
gold,

And he inherits soft, white hands,
And tender flesh that fears the cold,
Nor dares to wear a garment old;
A heritage, it seems to me,
One scarce would wish to hold in fee.
The rich man's son inherits cares;
The bank may break, the factory burn.
A breath may burst his bubble shares;
And soft, white hands could scarcely

earn

A living that would serve his turn;
A heritage, it seems to me,
One scarce would wish to hold in fee.
The rich man's son inherits wants,

His stomach craves for dainty fare;
With sated heart he hears the pants
Of toiling hinds with brown arms bare,
And wearies in his easy chair;
A heritage, it seems to me,

One scarce would wish to hold in fee.
What doth the poor man's son inherit?
Stout muscles and a sinewy heart,
A hardy frame, a hardier spirit;
King of two hands, he does his part
In every useful toil and art;

A heritage, it seems to me,
A king might wish to hold in fee.

What doth the poor man's son inherit?
Wishes o'erjoyed with humble things,
A rank adjudged by toil-worn merit,
Content that from employment springs,
A heart that in his labor sings;
A heritage, it seems to me,
A king might wish to hold in fee.

What doth the poor man's son inherit?
A patience learned of being poor;
Courage, if sorrow come, to bear it.
A fellow-feeling that is sure

To make the outcast bless his door;
A heritage, it seems to me,
A king might wish to hold in fee.

O, rich man's son! there is a toil
That with all others level stands;
Large charity doth never soil,

But only whiten, soft, white hands-
This is the best crop from thy lands;
A heritage, it seems to me,
Worth being rich to hold in fee.

O, poor man's son! scorn not thy state:
There is worse weariness than thine,
In merely being rich and great;
Toil only gives the soul to shine,
And makes rest fragrant and benign-
A heritage, it seems to me,
Worth being poor to hold in fee.

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ACT ON FULLER'S STAND AGAINST

UNIONISM.

Frank A. Fitzgerald, president of the Connecticut State Building Trades Council, has announced the following action taken at the semi-annual convention in Bristol, Conn., recently, which is of much importance to all members of the Trade Union Movement:

Early in this year, the firm that extensively manufactures brushes of all description, and known as the Fuller Brush Co., of the City of Hartford, Conn., had in contemplation the erection of a large set of new buildings within the jurisdiction of the Structural Building Trades Council of Hartford, Conn.

Following out an established custom, the Council, through its Secretary, Bro. George Watson, sent a letter to Alfred C. Fuller, President of the Fuller Brush Co., and requested him to give consideration to the employment of members of the Trade Union movement on the proposed building operations, and in this letter of Brother Watson's it was guaranteed to Mr. Fuller that there would be an extensive advertising of the Fuller product by members and friends of the Trade Union movement if Mr. Fuller would employ our men.

On May 1st, 1922, Bro. Watson's letter was answered to Secretary William A. Dermont of the Structural Building Trades Alliance, and this letter was signed by Mr. Alfred C. Fuller, President Fuller Brush Co., and certain paragraphs of the letter from Mr. Fuller we quote as follows:

"There is one phase of this question that is very serious, that is the labor unions are attempting through force and coercion to gain certain ends, many of which are extremely unethical, and are bound to have a very unfavorable reaction to the interest of labor in general. It makes very little difference to me that in certain instances the employer of labor has resorted to the same means."

"The thing which I personally object to above anything else in organized labor is the fact that they refuse to work in the same building even though working for dif ferent people, if there is a non-union man working. That policy or principle is entirely wrong from every standpoint, and so long as such a rule is in effect, I feel very reluctant to use union men, if for no other reason it has a direct effect and a detrimental effect on the rights of our own organization."

After receiving Mr. Fuller's letter there was convened a special session of the Building Trades Men of Connecticut, and it was voted that a circular letter be sent out to all of our friends informing them of the attitude of the Fuller Brush Co., and requesting in the letter that all honorable means be resorted to, to induce the Company to employ Organized Workers on the work for the

Fuller Company. This letter was sent out and dated June 20th, 1922.

The Quincy, Ill., Trades and Labor Assembly after receiving one of the above letters, appointed a committee to interview the Manager of the Agency of the Fuller Brush Co. in Quincy, Ill., and according to events the Manager sent a request for information to Hartford, Conn., relative to the complaint of the Committee in Quincy, Ill., and on September 23rd, 1922, a gentleman signing him. self (J. C. Altrock) Divisional Sales Manager, Hartford, Conn., to Mr.. Ellsworth Staver, the Agent in Quincy, Ill., sent a letter, part of which reads as follows:

"As a company we feel that we want to save money wherever possible and it so happened that a non-union concern made the lowest bid and got the contract. This concern has nothing against the union and nothing against any individual's personal faith or creed or policies. It simply accepted the lowest bid."

We ask all members and friends of the Trade Union movement to read over the paragraphs in the letter of the President of the concern (Mr. Alfred C. Fuller) and then to read over the one sent by his Sales Manager to Quincy, Ill., and compare them. You will observe that Mr. Fuller "positively refuses to have anything to do with Organized Wage Earners," and his Manager says, that it was the low bid that prompted the work to be done by non-union men.

You can readily understand that Mr. Fuller's letter is the one that displayed the attitude of the Company, and the letter of the Manager is one that is trying to deceive you.

As this fight of Mr. Fuller's against Union Labor is yours as well as against the Building Trades of Connecticut, we are asking you to please read this communication over carefully, and if an agent of the Fuller Company approaches you to buy the product of the Fuller Brush Co., which is also styled the "Hartford Brush," will you ask him or her, please, why Mr. Fuller is fighting or ganized wage earners of this country, and please pay no attention to excuses and polished talk on the part of agents as to why this immense building program was erected by non-union men.

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Entered as second-class matter, LaFayette, Ind., under act of March 3, 1879.
Published monthly; $1.00 per year.

The

Painter and Decorator

Volume XXXVII

OFFICIAL ORGAN OF

The Brotherhood of Painters, Decorators
and Paperhangers of America

FEBRUARY, 1923

Number Two

The Heritage

By JAMES RUSSELL LOWELL

HE rich man's son inherits lands,
And piles of brick, and stone, and
gold,

And he inherits soft, white hands,
And tender flesh that fears the cold,
Nor dares to wear a garment old;
A heritage, it seems to me,
One scarce would wish to hold in fee.
The rich man's son inherits cares;

The bank may break, the factory burn. A breath may burst his bubble shares; And soft, white hands could scarcely

earn

A living that would serve his turn;
A heritage, it seems to me,
One scarce would wish to hold in fee.
The rich man's son inherits wants,

His stomach craves for dainty fare;
With sated heart he hears the pants
Of toiling hinds with brown arms bare.
And wearies in his easy chair;
A heritage, it seems to me,
One scarce would wish to hold in fee.
What doth the poor man's son inherit?
Stout muscles and a sinewy heart,
A hardy frame, a hardier spirit;
King of two hands, he does his part
In every useful toil and art;

A heritage, it seems to me,
A king might wish to hold in fee.

What doth the poor man's son inherit?
Wishes o'erjoyed with humble things,
A rank adjudged by toil-worn merit,
Content that from employment springs.
A heart that in his labor sings;
A heritage, it seems to me,
A king might wish to hold in fee.

What doth the poor man's son inherit?
A patience learned of being poor;
Courage, if sorrow come, to bear it.
A fellow-feeling that is sure

To make the outcast bless his door;
A heritage, it seems to me,
A king might wish to hold in fee.

O, rich man's son! there is a toil
That with all others level stands;
Large charity doth never soil,

But only whiten, soft, white hands-
This is the best crop from thy lands;
A heritage, it seems to me,
Worth being rich to hold in fee.

O, poor man's son! scorn not thy state:
There is worse weariness than thine,
In merely being rich and great;
Toil only gives the soul to shine,

And makes rest fragrant and benign-
A heritage, it seems to me,
Worth being poor to hold in fee.

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