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UNITED STATES CONSULATE,
Liverpool, November 8, 1889.

Hon. WILLIAM F. WHARTON,

Assistant Secretary of State, Washington, D. C.

SIR: I desire to bring to the notice of the Department of State, with a view to having the matter brought before Congress at its next sitting, the very heavy expenditure I have been reluctantly obliged to make, during the four years I was consul, in order to carry on efficiently the work in connection with the shipping department of the consulate, the total amounting to £600 10s. 6d.

When I arrived at my post in June, 1885, I found that in addition to the allowance of $2.000 per annum for clerk hire there was an allowance of $2,100 per annum for the shipment and discharge of seamen, but that after the end of that month it would be discontinued altogether, Congress having made no appropriation.

This matter was brought before the notice of the State Department by my predecessor in his dispatch No. 319, dated June 6, 1885, and also by myself in my Nos. 52 and 91, dated February 1 and December 1, 1886, and I was finally informed that I could not receive any assistance from the Government in that direction, but that the subject would be brought to the notice of Congress-Department instruction No. 91, dated January 19, 1887.

No appropriation, however, was made for that department of the consulate during the whole four years that I was in charge, but the work had to be discharged. It is hardly necessary, I think, for me to say that the work in connection with the shipment and discharge of seamen at a port of such magnitude as Liverpool is very great, and although it was performed with as small a clerical force as possible, it has actually cost me the sum of £600 10s. 6d., which I paid in addition to the annual allowance for clerk hire.

Seeing, therefore, that the expenditure is absolutely necessary for clerical work in connection with the shipment and discharge of seamen, I am convinced that if these facts are brought before Congress I will be reimbursed this heavy outlay.

I therefore respectfully claim that the sum stated is due me, and I do so feeling that I am making a just and honorable claim, and one that can not but recommend itself to the consideration of Congress.

Some of the clerks to whom I paid this amount are no longer connected with the office, but I have no doubt I can procure from them a proper voucher for the amount each of them received, but those who remain can certify to this expenditure.

I am, sir, your obedient servant,

CHAS. T. RUSSELL.

Late Consul.

LIVERPOOL, January 10, 1890.

I, William J. Saulis, vice and deputy consul of the United States of America at Liverpool, do hereby certify that I was, during the period Mr. Russell was consul here, bookkeeper, and as such had the paying of salaries to the clerks of the consulate. That during the period from July 1, 1885, to June 30, 1889, I paid the sum of £600 10s. 6d. for clerical services performed in connection with the shipping department of the consulate in excess of the amount of clerk hire allowed during that period, the said expenditure having been actually and necessarily made, as appears by the books kept by me and now in Mr. Russell's possession. [SEAL.]

W. J. SAULIS,

Vice and Deputy Consul of the United States of America at Liverpool.

I, William Pierce, do hereby make oath and say that during the period 1st July, 1885, to 30th June, 1889, I was employed as clerk in the consulate at Liverpool. From my own knowledge I am aware and know that the sum of £600 10s. 6d. was actually paid by Mr. Russell in excess of the amount allowed for clerk hire during that period. Part of said amount was paid to myself and the remaining portion to clerks who are not now here.

WM. PIERCE.

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 10th day of January, 1890. [SEAL.]

THOS. H. SHERMAN,

Consul of the United States of America at Liverpool.

CHARLES T. RUSSELL-JOHN H. HASWELL.

UNITED STATES CONSULATE, 26 CHAPEL STREET,
Liverpool, January 11, 1890.

The statements herewith of the vice-consul and Mr. Pierce are entitled to full
I am not now pay-
faith and credit, but I desire to add that I am convinced that the disbursements
referred to were actually made and were actually necessary.
ing so much for extra clerks as Mr. Russell paid, because the Department has
sent to the consulate a competent consular clerk, but it will be apparent to any-
one who visits this office that additional allowance for clerk hire is needed.

THOS. H. SHERMAN,

Consul.

CHARLES T. RUSSELL, Esq.,

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,
Washington, February 21, 1890.

Late Consul of the United States, Liverpool.
Now at 50 Lime Street, London, England.

SIR: Referring to your dispatch of the 22d ultimo, I have to inform you that the Department has no funds out of which it has authority to render such relief as is required by your dispatch.

Your only recourse would seem to be to present your claim for reimbursement of the amount expended for clerk hire to Congress. I am, sir, your obedient servant,

WILLIAM F. WHARTON,
Assistant Secretary.

February 15, 1893.

[Senate Report No. 1294.]

Mr. Davis, from the Committee on Foreign Relations, submitted the following report:

The work of Mr. Haswell is one of great value, and its acquisition by the Government has been repeatedly recommended by the Department of State.

Secretary Blaine, under date May 6, 1892, in a personal letter to the chairman of this committee, strongly recommended the purchase of the manuscript designated in the amendment, and similar recommendations (hereto annexed) had previously been made by Mr. Frelinghuysen and also by Mr. Blaine.

The present Secretary of State, in a letter hereto appended, urges an appropriation for the purchase of this work.

The subject has also been considered in House Ex. Doc. 110, Fortyeighth Congress, second session, hereto appended. The adoption of the amendment is recommended.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE, Washington, February 24, 1885. SIR: I have the honor to again call your attention to the work prepared by Mr. John H. Haswell, Chief of the Bureau of Indexes and Archives in this Department, entitled The Chronological History of the Department of State and the Foreign Relations of the Government from September 5, 1774, down to the Present Time," and to express to you my earnest hope that Congress will not adjourn without appropriating a sum of money for the purchase of the manuscript from the compiler. The work has been compiled with infinite attention to historical accuracy and completeness by a gentleman whose long and efficient service in the Department has put him in a position to know perfectly the details of the subject on which he has written, and his researches outside the Department have resulted in the discovery of many important and hitherto unknown facts in the history of our foreign relations that should be at the service of the Department.

I do not think $6,000 too large a sum to pay Mr. Haswell for his work, considering the value of the book to this Department and the foreign service generally, and I earnestly recommend that that sum be appropriated for its purchase. I have the honor to be. sir, your obedient servant,

Hon. JOHN F. MILLER,

FREDK. T. FRELINGHUYSEN.

Chairman Committee on Foreign Relations, United States Senate.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE, Washington, December 20, 1891.

SIR: I have the honor to invite your considerate attention to the accompanying draft of a proposed amendment to the diplomatic and consular appropriation bill for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, providing for the appropriation of $6,000 to be expended in the purchase of the manuscript of "The Chronological History of the Department of State and the Foreign Relations of the Government from September 5, 1774, to the Present Date," from Mr. John H. Haswell, Chief of the Bureau of Indexes and Archives in this Department, by whom it has been compiled with industrious care and with the advantage of years of experience and familiarity with the subject.

Copy of a letter of my predecessor, Mr. Frelinghuysen, in relation to this matter, dated March 24, 1884, and copy of a report upon the work by Mr. Henry O'Connor, late examiner of claims of the Department, dated September 26, 1883, are inclosed for your convenient reference and information. Mr. Frelinghuysen points out the value and usefulness of the book; commends its arrangement and completeness, and asks for its purchase for publication, in the full belief that it will be a valuable handbook of reference to the heads of the Executive Departments of the Government, and in the certainty that it will be invaluable to the Committees of Foreign Affairs of Congress, to Secretaries of State and their assistants, and to officers in the foreign service of the Government." I concur in his opinion and commendation, and add the expression of my own conviction that the work, if purchased, would be of special and lasting service.

Its compilation has occupied much of Mr. Haswell's time, outside of his regular duties at the Department, during the last eighteen years. An item looking to its purchase was submitted by this Department, under the title "Historical Regi ter of the Department of State," in the estimates for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892. I have the honor, etc.,

Hon. EUGENE HALE,

JAMES G. BLAINE.

United States Senate.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE, Washington, January 14, 1893.

SIR: I have the honor to call your attention to and to bespeak your favorable consideration of an item submitted in the estimates of appropriations required by this Department for the coming fiscal year, in the sum of $6,000, for the purchase of The Historical Register of the Department of State," compiled by Mr. John H. Haswell, Chief of the Bureau of Indexes and Archives.

The full description of the work, as given in the estimates, shows how complete are its scope and usefulness, particularly as regards the business of this Department. It is no less valuable by reason of the historical information, which is one of its characteristic features, as a book of reference for members of Congress, for officers of the Government, and for students in American history. It has long since been recognized as such by high officials of this Department, and Secretaries of State Frelinghuysen, Bayard, and Blaine have in turn recommended its purchase to Congress.

I wish to add my own earnest recommendation to theirs, and to say that, by so doing, I am not merely seeking to secure to Mr. Haswell a remuneration for his work. I sincerely believe the acquisition of the Historical Register to be for the public interest.

I am, sir, your obedient servant,

Hon. CHARLES F. CRISP,

Speaker of the House of Representatives.

JOHN W. FOSTER.

[House Ex. Doc. No. 110, Forty eighth Congress, second session.]

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, January 21, 1885.

SIR: I have the honor to forward herewith an estimate of appropriation received from the Secretary of State for $6,000 to purchase the manuscript of the work entitled "The Chronological History of the Department of State and the Foreign Relations of the Government from September 5, 1774, to the Present Time," compiled by John H. Haswell.

Very respectfully,

The SPEAKER OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES.

H. MCCULLOCH,

Secretary.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE, Washington, January 19, 1885.

SIR: I have the honor to request that, under the act passed July 7, 1884, you recommend to Congress an appropriation of the sum of $6,000 to enable the Secretary of State to purchase the manuscript of the work entitled "The Chronological History of the Department of State and the Foreign Relations of the Government from September 5, 1774, to the Present Time," compiled by Mr. John H. Haswell, Chief of the Bureau of Indexes and Archives in this Department. The subject of the purchase of the manuscript from the author for publication was presented to Congress at its last session, as will appear from the letter address ed by me on the 24th day of March last to the Speaker of the House of Representatives, a copy of which is inclosed.

I now learn from Mr. Haswell, by a communication from him of even date (a copy of which is also inclosed herewith), that he is engaged in carrying the record of the Department and the foreign service down to July 1, 1885, a period nearly two years later than was intended at the time the letter of the Department above aluded to was sent to the Speaker.

This addition makes the work a comprehensive history of every branch of the foreign relations of this country, of the treaties, the international conferences, the diplomatic and consular service, the Committees of Foreign Affairs of Congress, and the officers of every grade of this Department from the time of the first Colonial Congress down to the very day on which the publication of the work is expected to be completed, and gives the compilation an inestimable value as a reference book to this Department, to Committees on Foreign Affairs, and to the foreign service of the Government. In the opinion of this Department, the immediate purchase and speedy publication of this work will be of incalculable benefit, and I have the honor to recommend that such steps as are necessary to that end be taken as soon as possible. I have also to recommend that for that purpose a clause similar to the draft inclosed herewith be inserted in the proper appropriation bill.

FREDK. T. FRELINGHUYSEN.

I have the honor to be, sir, your obedient servant, Hon. HUGH MCCULLOCH,

Secretary of the Treasury.

To enable the Secretary of State to purchase from John H. Haswell, Chief of the Bureau of Indexes and Archives in the Department of State, the manuscript of "The Chronological History of the Department of State and the Foreign Relations of the Government from September 5, 1774, to July 1, 1885," prepared by him, the sum of $6,000 is hereby approprated.

And the Public Printer is hereby authorized, upon the requisition of the Secretary of State, to cause to be printed and bound in cloth, for the use of the Department of State, 2,000 copies of the above-mentioned work.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,
Washington, March 24, 1884.

SIR: Mr. John H. Haswell, chief of the the bureau of indexes and archives in this Department, has compiled a chronological history of the Department of State and of the foreign relations of the United States from the time of the organiza

tion of the first Colonial Congress, in September, 1774, down to the present time. In it is presented a complete and accurate record of the dates of appointment and terms of service of all presiding officers of the Colonial Congress, of Presidents of the United States, of Secretaries of State, under secretaries, and ali officers, clerks, etc.. of this Department (including those of the Patent Office previous to its transfer to the Department of the Interior), of committees having charge of our foreign affairs, and of all officers connected with the foreign service of the United States, either diplomatic, consular, political, or special, as well as the dates of presentation and terms of service of all representatives of foreign countries accredited to this Government. A brief synopsis of every treaty, convention, protocol, or agreement between the United States and a foreign government, and the cause, nature, and result of every international tribunal and commission to which the United States has been a party.

The work has been compiled by Mr. Haswell with the greatest regard for completeness and accuracy-about twelve years having been consumed by him (outside of his regular duties at the Department) in its preparation-and he has succeeded in arranging its contents in such a form as to facilitate in the highest pos ible degree a reference to any particular subject or to the official history of any individual, thus insuring its value as a handbook of reference. Many important facts in the early history of our foreign relations not hitherto known have been discovered by the author in his exhaustive researches among the Government archives and are here presented for the first time; and his work is of especial value because it completes the imperfect records of the early period of this Department, many of which were destroyed during the war of 1812.

Two of the Assistant Secretaries of State and the examiner of claims have examined the work and recommend its purchase for publication, in the full belief that it will be a valuable handbook of reference to the heads of the Executive Departments of the Government and in the certainty that it will be invaluable to the Committees of Foreign Affairs of Congress, to Secretaries of State and their assistants, and to officers in the foreign service of the Government.

I have the honor to be, sir, your obedient servant,

Hon. JOHN G. CARLISLE,

Speaker of the House of Representatives.

FRED'K T. FRELINGHUYSEN,

DEPARTMENT OF STATE, Washington, September 26, 1883.

SIR: I have gone over, with the aid of Mr. Haswell and with some care on my own part, that gentleman's rare and valuable compilation of the officers, employees, and events of the Department of State, including our foreign service, diplomatic and consular, from the earliest steps of the colonists toward independence up to the present year.

Mr. Haswell's unpretentious work shows both skill and industry.

Commencing with the Continental Congress in 1774, he has given a bird's-eye view of the men and events of which he treats up to the present year-Presidents and Vice-Presidents of the United States; Secretaries of State and Assistant Secretaries; all the officers and clerks who have ever been in the Department; all our ministers abroad, general and special; all consular officers of every grade who have been in the service of the Government; the date and character of all treaties and conventions concluded between the United States and foreign powers; all commissions and arbitrations established under claims conventions or to which this Government was a party.

This, though its chief, is by no means its only value. It is interspersed with pertinent and rare scraps of history, which to the curious scholar, the historian, or the gentleman of leisure will be found most interesting and valuable.

To all the Executive Departments of the Government it would prove to be a most valuable book of reference: to this Department it would be almost invaluable, and should be on the tables of the Secretary and his assistants.

Such a work, even imperfectly done, would be useful, but one of the chief merits of Mr. Haswell's performance is in the accuracy, exactness, and completeness with which he has accomplished his laborious task.

I hope some way may be found to make the work available for use and at the same time to remunerate Mr. Haswell for what must have cost him many years of labor.

With great respect, etc.,

Hon. FREDERICK T. FRELINGHUYSEN.

HENRY O'CONNOR,
Examiner of Claims.

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