An Introduction to Child Psychology

Pirmais vāks
Houghton-Mifflin Company, 1918 - 317 lappuses
 

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Saturs

I
xix
III
28
V
49
VI
69
VII
92
IX
121
X
151
XII
183
XIII
207
XV
224
XVII
253
XIX
277

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Populāri fragmenti

43. lappuse - In no case may we interpret an action as the outcome of the exercise of a higher psychical faculty, if it can be interpreted as the outcome of the exercise of one which stands lower in the psychological scale, (p.
99. lappuse - We may, then, define an instinct as an inherited or innate psycho-physical disposition which determines its possessor to perceive, and to pay attention to, objects of a certain class, to experience an emotional excitement of a particular quality upon perceiving such an object, and to act in regard to it in a particular manner, or, at least, to experience an impulse to such action.
23. lappuse - Bureau shall investigate and report . . . upon all matters pertaining to the welfare of children and child life among all classes of our people...
211. lappuse - ... character of the developing child, but what most influences him is the peculiarly affective state which is totally unknown to his parents and educators. The concealed discord between the parents, the secret worry, the repressed hidden wishes, all these produce in the individual a certain affective state with its objective signs which slowly but surely, though unconsciously, works its way into the child's mind, producing therein the same conditions and hence the same reactions to external stimuli.
106. lappuse - Take away these instinctive dispositions with their powerful impulses, and the organism would become incapable of activity of any kind ; it would lie inert and motionless like a wonderful clockwork whose mainspring had been removed or a steam-engine whose fires had been drawn.
210. lappuse - It is not the good and pious precepts, nor is it any other inculcation of pedagogic truths that have a moulding influence upon the character of the developing child, but what most influences him is the peculiarly affective state which is totally unknown to his parents and educators. The concealed discord between the parents, the secret worry, the repressed hidden wishes, all these produce in the individual a certain affective state with its objective signs which slowly but surely, though unconsciously,...
12. lappuse - like horses on the road, Must well be lash'd before they take the load ; They may be willing for a time to run, But you must whip them ere the work be done...
153. lappuse - ... demonstratives, prepares the outlines of the sentence, and already represents the verb and the names of states or actions. Imitation, direct or symbolical, and necessarily only approximative of the sounds of external nature, ie, onomatopoeia, furnished the elements of the attributive roots, from which arise the names of objects, special verbs, and their derivatives. Analogy and metaphor complete the vocabulary, applying to the objects, discerned by touch, sight, smell, and taste, qualifying adjectives...
153. lappuse - Animals possess two of the important elements of language — the spontaneous reflex cry of emotion or need; the voluntary cry of warning, threat, or summons. From these two sorts of utterance, man, endowed already with a richer vocal apparatus and a more developed brain, evolved numerous varieties by means of stress, reduplication, intonation. The warning or summoning cry...
122. lappuse - I regard play as the motor habits and spirit of the past of the race, persisting in the present, as rudimentary functions sometimes of and always akin to rudimentary organs.

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