International Regimes for the Final Frontier

Pirmais vāks
SUNY Press, 2012. gada 1. febr. - 352 lappuses
Examines the negotiations between nations that lead to international agreements regulating human activity in outer space.

Neither rational choice theory, with its emphasis on interest calculation, nor sociological institutionalist theory, with its emphasis on identity-defined rule following, indicates how governments determine which of their multiple interests or identities are at stake in a particular situation or how they develop mutual comprehension of each other’s goals. International Regimes for the Final Frontier addresses these gaps by tracing how governments approach an unfamiliar issue—in this case, international agreements regulating human activity in outer space between 1958 and 1988—and examines three ways situation definitions channel governments’ approaches to issues or problems.

M. J. Peterson is Professor of Political Science at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst and is the author of Recognition of Governments: Legal Doctrine and State Practice, 1815–1995.
 

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Atlasītās lappuses

Saturs

Creating Regimes for The Final Frontier
1
Actors Social Structures and Interaction
2
Situation Definitions and Interaction
8
The Patterns of Space Activity 19571988
14
Plan of the Study
18
The Institutional Context of Negotiations
21
The UN Forums
24
Participants in the Negotiations
37
From Outer Space to Space and Celestial Bodies
133
Confirming the Separation and the Different Rules
141
Explaining Preference Formation Preference Aggregation and Negotiation Outcomes
144
Exploring and Using the Moon
153
Appreciating the Situation
154
Providing Reassurance
156
Contending over Resource Management
158
Explaining Preference Formation Preference Aggregation and Negotiation Outcomes
164

Implications of the Two Levels of Institutions
39
The Locational Classification of Outer Space
41
Classifying Outer Space as a Location
42
Reasoning by Analogy
44
Selecting the Initial Analogy for Classifying Outer Space
49
Moving to Multiple Analogies
53
Delimiting the Outer Space Commons
59
Explaining Preference Formation Preference Aggregation and Negotiation Outcomes
66
Aspects of Spaceflight
75
Appreciating the Registration and Rescue Problems
76
The Soviet Initiative on Rescue of Space Crews
80
The French Initiative on Registration
87
Explaining Preference Formation Preference Aggregation and Negotiation Outcomes
91
Liability for Damage on Earth
101
Setting the Broad Parameters and Resolving
103
Resolving the Acute Disagreements
113
Explaining Preference Formation Preference Aggregation and Negotiation Outcomes
117
Military Activity in Outer Space
125
Appreciating the Situation
126
The OrbitSpectrum Resource
173
Appreciating the Situation
174
Bringing Space Users into the Radio Regime
183
The Third World Drive for Comprehensive Planning
185
Elaborating the Mixed Access Rule
193
Explaining Preference Formation Preference Aggregation and Negotiation Outcomes
200
Situation Definitions in the Outer Space Negotiations
213
Establishing Situation Definitions
214
The Impact of Situation Definitions on Preference Formation
217
The Impact of Situation Definitions on Preference Aggregation
220
The Impact of Situation Definitions on Negotiation Outcomes
228
Situation Definitions and Explanations of Actor Conduct
231
The Future of the Space Treaties
235
Notes
237
Bibliography
281
List of Titles SUNY series in Global Politics
315
Index
319
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Atsauces uz šo grāmatu

The International Politics of Space
Michael J. Sheehan
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Par autoru (2012)

M. J. Peterson is Professor of Political Science at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst and is the author of Recognition of Governments: Legal Doctrine and State Practice, 1815 1995.

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