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The working capital as reported in Exhibit closing October 15, 1881, was $217,500.26. The variance was caused by foreclosure and purchase of G. W. McCleary property, held by mortgage for $2,284.43, reducing the working fund by that amount, and it was increased $1,220 by sale of ne ne, nw ne, sw ne, se ne, ne nw, and nw nw, sw nw of 10, 70, 12.

The unsold lands of the University remain about as formerly reported, being as follows:

University lands.
Saline lands....
Donated lands.

.2,059 70-100 acres. .3,167 10-100 acres. 560

acres.

OF THE

JOINT COMMITTEE

OF THE

TWENTIETH GENERAL ASSEMBLY

OF THE

STATE OF IOWA,

APPOINTED TO VISIT THE

STATE UNIVERSITY

LOCATED AT

IOWA CITY.

PRINTED BY ORDER OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY.

DES MOINES:
GEO. E. ROBERTS, STATE PRINTER.

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REPORT

To the Thentieth General Assembly of Iowa:

Consequent upon the appointment made by the Honorable President of the Senate and the Honorable Speaker of the House, under the provisions of a concurrent resolution, the undersigned committee visited the State University of Iowa, and beg to submit the following report as the result of their labors:

Believing that our great State has reached that period in its advancement that the question as to the permanency of an institution so closely related to the intellectual growth, and the educational advantages of its youth and early manhood is no longer one of doubt or dissension, your committee directed its investigation especially as to the needs and necessities for the future, closely examining as to the expenditures in the past.

The Institution is controlled by a Board of Regents, and its financial affairs intrusted during the interim of sessions of said Board to an Executive Committee. Your committee are of the opinion that this plan could be improved upon, as far as it relates to said committee, and believe that more frequent meetings of the Board of Regents would be advisable and desirable.

The report of said Board to the Honorable Superintendent of Public Instruction, covering the report of the President of the University, clearly sets forth the disbursements for the term ending August 15, 1883, and pointedly refers to the wants of the Institution consequent upon its steady growth and increasing usefulness. These reports received the careful scrutiny of your committee, and a cheerful approval and endorsement is accorded the same.

The Medical Department is comfortably located in the building erected for its purpose, but necessarily will need some recognition at your hands to complete the accommodations incidental to its require. ments. In this connection your committee regret to express an opinion somewhat disapproving the action of the last General Assembly, in not allowing a sufficient sum to erect a building which in all its details should be in conformity to the wealth and growth of the State.

While the structure seems to have been erected in perfect harmony with the laws and rules of architecture, and properly designed for the purpose intended, it is not, in its internal arrangement and construction, of more than common, ordinary workmanship and material. In fact, on every hand, passing from room to room, the appointments prompt the thought that the closest economy, without regard to appearance or durability, prevailed.

The hospital seems to answer its purposes, and the improvements there made were of such a character as were absolutely demanded for the preservation of the building.

The Dental Department, the latest addition to the University, has, beyond the fondest expectations of its friends, reached in the short time of its existence a position to demonstrate that it is a necessary and successful branch, and is entitled to the care and encouragement of the General Assembly. Your committee earnestly recommend that such appropriation be made as will properly assist this department and permit the Board of Regents to give it that recognition it deserves and has faithfully earned.

The Homeopathic Medical Department, situated in a substantial building erected for that purpose, should share in the general appropriations recommended for the whole institution. It seems to satisfactorily accomplish its mission, and by the addition of one or two chairs complete its system of instruction, which needs not to interfere with any other branch of the University.

The Law Department is entitled to our earnest support and commendation. It is justly proud of its record, and is self-sustaining, as the Medical Department will soon be. Whenever the General Assembly, by its enactments, will raise the standard of the profession by restrictions as to admissions to the bar, the thorough course and training received in this department will proportionately be more appreciated and demanded. Its' needs and necessities were apparent to your committee, and their speedy abrogation are recommended.

The Collegiate Department, which challenges the attention and interest of the whole people of the State more than any other branch,

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