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expenses or losses were incurred in consideration of the time value of money.

(2) Certain foreign currency borrowings—(i) Rule. If a taxpayer borrows in a nonfunctional currency at a rate of interest that is less than the applicable federal rate (or its equivalent in functional currency if the functional currency is not the dollar), any swap, forward, future, option, or similar financial arrangement (or any combination thereof) entered into by the taxpayer or by a related person (as defined in $1.861-8T(C)(2)) that exists during the term of the borrowing and that substantially diminishes currency risk with respect to the borrowing or interest expense thereon will be presumed to constitute a hedge of such borrowing, unless the taxpayer can demonstrate on the basis of facts and circumstances that the two transactions are in fact unrelated. Under this presumption, the currency loss incurred on the borrowing during taxable years beginning after December 31, 1988, in connection with hedged nonfunctional currency borrowings, reduced or increased by the gain or loss on the hedge, will be apportioned in the same manner as interest expense. This presumption can be rebutted by a showing that the financial arrangement was entered into in connection with hedging currency exposure arising in the ordinary course of a trade or business (other than with respect to the borrowing).

(ii) Examples. The principles of this paragraph (b)(2) may be illustrated by the following examples.

Erample 1. Taxpayer has a dollar functional currency and does not have any qualified business units with a functional currency other than the dollar. On January 1, 1989, when the unit of foreign currency is worth $1, taxpayer borrows 100 units of foreign currency for a three-year period bearing interest at the annual rate of 3 percent and immediately converts the proceeds of the borrowing into dollars for use in its business. In the ordinary course of its business, taxpayer has no foreign currency exposure in this currency. In March 1989, taxpayer enters into a three-year swap agreement that covers most, but not all, of the payment of interest and principal. Because the swap substantially diminishes currency risk with respect to the borrowing, it is presumed to hedge the loan. Since taxpayer cannot demonstrate that it was hedging currency exposure arising in the

ordinary course of its business (other than currency exposure with respect to the borrowing), the net currency loss on the borrowing adjusted for any gain or loss on the swap must be apportioned in the same manner as interest expense.

Erample 2. Assume the same facts as in Example 1, except that the taxpayer borrows in two separate foreign currencies on terms described in Example 1 and enters into a swap agreement in a single currency that substantially diminishes the taxpayer's aggregate foreign currency risk. The net currency loss on the borrowings adjusted for any gain or loss on the swap must be apportioned in the same manner as interest expense.

(3) Losses on sale of certain receivables-(1) General rule. Any loss on the sale of a trade receivable (as defined in $1.954–2(h)) shall be allocated and apportioned, solely for purposes of this section and $81.861-10T, 1.861-11T, 1.86112T, and 1.861-13T, in the same manner as interest expense, unless at the time of sale of the receivable, it bears interest at a rate which is at least 120 percent of the short term applicable federal rate (as determined under section 1274(d) of the Code), or its equivalent in foreign currency in the case of receivables denominated in foreign currency, determined at the time the receivable arises. This treatment shall not affect the characterization of such expense as interest for other purposes of the Internal Revenue Code.

(ii) Exceptions. To the extent that a loss on the sale of a trade receivable exceeds the discount on the receivable that would be computed applying to the amount received on the sale of the receivable 120 percent of the applicable federal rate (or its equivalent in foreign currency in the case of receivables denominated in foreign currency) for the period commencing with the date on which the receivable is sold and ending with the earlier of the date on which the receivable begins to bear interest at such rate or the anticipated payment date of the receivable, such excess shall not be allocated and apportioned in the same manner as interest expense but rather shall be allocated and apportioned to the gross income generated by the receivable. In cases of transfers of receivables to a domestic international sales corporation described $1.994–1(c)(6)(v), the rule of this paragraph (b)(3) shall not apply for purposes of computing combined taxable

income. In computing the combined may, in effect, pay interest at a floattaxable income of a foreign sales cor- ing rate by entering into an interest poration and its related supplier, loss rate swap. Similarly, a taxpayer that is on the sale of receivables to a third obligated to pay interest at a floating party incurred either by the foreign rate may, in effect, limit its exposure sales corporation or its related supplier to rising interest rates by purchasing a shall offset combined taxable income, cap. Such a taxpayer may have gains notwithstanding the provisions of this or losses associated with such derivaparagraph (b)(3). See $1.924(a)-1T(g)(7). tive financial products. This paragraph Erample. On October 1, X sells a widget to

(b)(6) provides rules for the treatment Y for $100 payable in 30 days, after which the

of gains and losses from such derivareceivable will bear stated interest at 13 per- tive financial products (“financial cent. On October 4, X sells Y's obligation to products") that are part of transZ for $98. Assume that the applicable federal actions described in paragraph (b)(1) of rate for the month of October is 10 percent. this section and that are used by the Applying 120 percent of the applicable fed

taxpayer to alter its effective cost of eral rate to the $98 received on the sale of

borrowing with respect to an actual lithe receivable, the obligation is discounted at a 12 percent rate for a period of 27 days. At

ability. This paragraph (b)(6) shall only this discount rate, the obligation would have

apply where the hedge and the borsold for $99.22. Thus, 88 cents of the $2 loss on rowing are in the same currency and the sale is apportioned in the same manner shall not apply to the extent otherwise as interest expense, and $1.22 of the $2 loss on provided in section 988 and the regulathe sale is directly allocated to the income

tions thereunder. The allocation and generated on the widget sale.

apportionment of a loss under this (4) Rent in certain leasing transactions. paragraph (b) shall not affect the char[Reserved]

acterization of such loss as capital or (5) Treatment of bond premiumi) ordinary for other purposes of the Code Treatment by the issuer. If a bond or and the regulations thereunder. other debt obligation is issued at a pre- (ii) Definition of gain and loss. For mium, an amount of interest expense purposes of this paragraph (b)(6), the incurred by the issuer on that bond or term “gain” refers to the excess of the other debt obligation equal to the am- amounts properly taken into income ortized portion of that premium that is under a financial product that alters included in gross income for the year the effective cost of borrowing over the shall be allocated and apportioned sole- amounts properly allowed as a deducly to the amortized portion of premium tion thereunder within a given taxable derived by the issuer for the year.

year. See. e.g., Notice 89–21. The term (ii) Treatment by the holder. If a bond "loss” refers to the excess of the or debt obligation is purchased at a amounts properly allowed as a deducpremium, the portion of that premium tion under such a financial product amortized during the year by the hold- over the amounts properly taken into er under section 171 and the regula- income thereunder within a given taxtions thereunder shall be allocated and

able year. apportioned solely to interest income (iii) Treatment of gain or loss on the derived from the bond by the holder for disposition of a financial product. [Rethe year.

served] (6) Financial products that alter effec- (iv) Entities that are not financial serutive cost of borrowing—(i) In general. ices entities. An entity that does not Various derivative financial products constitute a financial services entity can be part of transactions or series of within the meaning of $1.9044(e)(3) transactions described in paragraph shall treat gains and losses on financial (b)(1) of this section. Such derivative products described

paragraph financial products, including interest (b)(6)(i) of this section as follows. rate swaps, options, forwards, caps, and (A) Losses. Losses on any financial collars, potentially alter a taxpayer's product described in paragraph (b)(6)(i) effective cost of borrowing with respect of this section shall be apportioned in to an actual liability of the taxpayer. the same manner as interest expense For example, a taxpayer that is obli- whether or not such financial product gated to pay interest at a fixed rate is identified by the taxpayer under

in

paragraph (b)(6)(iv)(C) of this section as a liability hedge.

(B) Gains. Gains on any financial product described in paragraph (b)(6)(i) of this section shall reduce the taxpayer's total interest expense that is subject to apportionment, but only if such financial product is identified by the taxpayer under paragraph (b)(6)(iv)(C) of this section as a liability hedge. Such reduction is accomplished by directly allocating interest expense to the income derived from such a financial product.

(C) Identification of financial products. A taxpayer can identify a financial product described in paragraph (b)(6)(i) of this section as hedging a particular interest-bearing liability (or any group of such liabilities) by clearly identifying on its books and records on the same day that it becomes a party to such arrangement that such arrangement hedges a given liability (or group of liabilities). In the case of a partial hedge, such identification shall apply to only that part of the liability that is hedged. If the taxpayer clearly identifies on its books and records a financial product as a hedge of an interest-bearing asset (or any group of such assets), it will create a rebuttable presumption that such financial product is not described in paragraph (b)(6)(i) of this section. A taxpayer may identify a hedge as relating to an anticipated liability, provided that such liability is in fact incurred within 120 days following the date of such identification. Gains and losses on such an anticipatory arrangement accruing prior to the time at which the liability is incurred shall constitute an adjustment to interest expense.

(v) Financial services entities. (Reserved]

(vi) Dealers. The rule of paragraph (b)(6)(iv) of this section shall not apply to a person acting in its capacity as a regular dealer in the financial products described in paragraph (b)(6)(i) of this section. Instead, losses sustained by a regular dealer in connection with such financial products shall be allocated to the class of gross income from such arrangements. Gains of a regular dealer in notional principal contracts are governed by the rules of $1.863-7T(b). Amounts received or accrued by any

person from any financial product that is integrated as specified in Notice 89 90 with an asset shall not be treated as amounts received or accrued by a person acting in its capacity as a regular dealer in financial products.

(vii) Eramples. The principles of this paragraph (b)(6) may be illustrated by the following examples.

Erample 1. X is not a financial services entity or regular dealer in the financial products described in paragraph (b)(6)(i) of this section and has a dollar functional currency. In 1990, X incurred a total of $200 of interest expense. On January 1, 1990, X entered into an interest rate swap agreement with Y, in order to hedge its interest rate exposure with respect to a pre-existing floating rate liability. On the same day, X properly identified the agreement as a hedge of such liability. Under the agreement, X is required to pay Y an amount equal to a fixed rate of 10 percent on a notional principal amount of $1,000. Y is required to pay X an amount equal to a floating rate of interest on the same notional principal amount. Under the agreement, X received from Y during 1990 a net payment of $25. Because X identified the swap agreement as a liability hedge under the rules of paragraph (b)(6)(iv)(C), X may effectively reduce its total allocable interest expense for 1990 to $175 by directly allocating $25 of interest expense to the swap income. Had X not properly identified the swap as a liability hedge, this swap payment would have been treated as domestic source income in accordance with the rule of $1.863–7T(b).

Example 2. Assume the same facts as Example (1), except that X did not properly identify the agreement as a liability hedge on January 1, 1990. In 1990, X made a net payment of $25 to Y under the swap agreement. This swap payment is allocated and apportioned in the same manner as interest expense

under the rules of paragraph (b)(6)(iv)(A).

(viii) Effective dates—(A) Losses. The rules of this paragraph (b)(6) shall apply to losses on any transaction described in paragraph (b)(6)(i) of this section that was entered into after September 14, 1988.

(B) Gains. Except as provided in paragraph (b)(6)(viii)(C) of this section, the rules of this paragraph (b)(6) shall apply to any gain that was realized on any transaction described in paragraph (b)(6)(i) of this section that was entered into after August 14, 1989.

(C) Exception for interim gains. Taxpayers shall be permitted to apply the rules of this paragraph (b)(6) to any

manner

gain that was realized on any transaction described in paragraph (b)(6)(i) of this section that was entered into after September 14, 1988 and on or before August 14, 1989, if the taxpayer can demonstrate to the satisfaction of the Commissioner that substantially all of the arrangements described in paragraph (b)(6)(i) of this section to which the taxpayer became a party during that interim period were identified on the taxpayer's books and records with the liabilities of the taxpayer in a substantially contemporaneous and that all losses and expenses that are subject to the rules of this paragraph (b)(6) were treated in the same manner as interest expense. For this purpose, arrangements that were identified in a substantially contemporaneous manner with the taxpayer's assets shall be ignored.

(7) Foreign currency gain or loss. In addition to the rules of paragraph (b)(1), (b)(2), and (b)(6) of this section, any foreign currency loss that is treated as an adjustment to interest expense under regulations issued under section 988 shall be allocated and apportioned in the same manner as interest expense. Any foreign currency gain that is treated as an adjustment to interest expense under regulations issued under section 988 shall offset apportionable interest expense.

(c) Allowable deductions. In order for an interest expense to be allocated and apportioned, it must first be determined that the interest expense is currently deductible. A number of provisions in the Code disallow or suspend deductions of interest expense or require the capitalization thereof.

(1) Disallowed deductions. A taxpayer does not allocate and apportion interest expense under this section that is permanently disallowed as a deduction by operation of section 163(h), section 265, or any other provision or rule that permanently disallows the deduction of interest expense.

(2) Section 263 A. Section 263A requires the capitalization of interest expense that is allocable to designated types of property. Any interest expense that is capitalized under section 263A does not constitute deductible interest expense for purposes of this section. Furthermore, interest expense capitalized in

inventory or depreciable property is not separately allocated and apportioned when the inventory is sold or depreciation is allowed. Capitalized interest expense is effectively allocated and apportioned as part of, and in the same manner as, the cost of goods sold, amortization, or depreciation deduction.

(3) Section 163(d). Section 163(d) suspends the deduction for interest expense to the extent that it exceeds net investment income. In the year that suspended investment interest expense becomes allowable under the rules of section 163(d), that interest expense is apportioned under rules set forth in paragraph (d)(1) of this section as though it were incurred in the taxable year in which the expense is deducted.

(4) Section 469—(i) General rule. Section 469 suspends the deduction of passive activity losses to the extent that they exceed passive activity income for the year. Passive activity losses may consist in part of interest expense properly allocable to passive activity. In the year that suspended interest expense becomes allowable as a deduction under the rules of section 469, that interest expense is apportioned under rules set forth in paragraph (d)(1) of this section as though it were incurred in the taxable year in which the expense is deducted.

(ii) Identification of the interest component of a suspended passive loss. A suspended passive loss may consist of a variety of items of expense other than interest expense. Suspended interest expense for any taxable year is computed by multiplying the total suspended passive loss for the year by a fraction, the numerator of which is passive interest expense for the year (determined under regulations issued under section 163) and the denominator of which is total passive expenses for the year. The amount of the suspended interest expense that is considered to be deductible in a subsequent taxable year is computed by multiplying the amount of any cumulative suspended interest expense (reduced by suspended interest expense allowed as a deduction in prior taxable years) times a fraction, the numerator of which is the portion of cumulative suspended passive losses that become deductible in the taxable year and the denominator of which is the cumulative suspended passive losses for prior taxable years (reduced by suspended passive losses allowed as deductions in prior taxable years).

(iii) Example. The rules of this paragraph (c)(4) may be illustrated by the following example.

Example. On January 1, 1987, A, a United States citizen, invested in a passive activity. In 1987, the passive activity generated no passive income and $100 in passive losses, all of which were suspended by operation of section 469. The suspended loss included $10 of suspended interest expense. In 1988, the passive activity generated $50 in passive income and $150 in passive expenses which included $30 of interest expense. The entire $100 passive loss was suspended in 1988 and included $20 of interest expense ($100 suspended passive loss x $30 passive interest expense/$150 total passive expenses). Thus, at the end of 1988, A had total suspended passive losses of $200, including $30 of suspended interest expense. In 1989, the passive activity generated $100 in passive income and no passive expenses. Thus, $100 of A's cumulative suspended passive loss was therefore allowed in 1989. The $100 of deductible passive loss includes $15 of suspended interest expense ($30 cumulative suspended interest expense x $100 of cumulative suspended passive losses allowable in 1989/$200 of total cumulative suspended passive losses). The $15 of interest expense is apportioned under the rules of paragraph (d) of this section as though it were incurred in 1989.

(d) Apportionment rules for individuals, estates, and certain trusts (1) United States individuals. In the case of taxable years beginning after December 31, 1986, individuals generally shall apportion interest expense under different rules according to the type of interest expense incurred. The interest expense of individuals shall be characterized under the regulations issued under section 163. However, in the case of an individual whose foreign source income (including income that is excluded under section 911) does not exceed a gross amount of $5,000, the apportionment of interest expense under this section is not required. Such an individual's interest expense may be allocated entirely to domestic source income.

(i) Interest incurred in the conduct of a trade or business. An individual who incurs business interest described in section 163(h)(2)(A) shall apportion such

interest expense using an asset method by reference to the individual's business assets.

(ii) Investment interest. An individual who incurs investment interest described in section 163(h)(2)(B) shall apportion that interest expense on the basis of the individual's investment assets.

(iii) Interest incurred in a passive activity. An individual who incurs passive activity interest described in section 163(h)(2)(C) shall apportion that interest expense on the basis of the individual's passive activity assets. Individuals who receive a distributive share of interest expense incurred in a partnership are subject to special rules set forth in paragraph (e) of this section.

(iv) Qualified residence and deductible personal interest. Individuals who incur qualified residence interest described in section 163(h)(2)(D) shall apportion that interest expense under a gross income method, taking into account all income (including business, passive activity, and investment income) but excluding income that is exempt under section 911. For purposes of this section, any qualified residence that is rented shall be considered to be a business asset for the period in which it is rented, with the result that the interest on such a residence is not apportioned under this subdivision (iv) but instead under subdivisions (i) or (iii) of this paragraph (d)(1). To the extent that personal interest described in section 163(h)(2) remains deductible under transitional rules, individuals shall apportion such interest expense in the same manner as qualified residence interest.

(v) Example. The following example illustrates the principles of this section.

Example –(i) Facts. A is a resident individual taxpayer engaged in the active conduct of a trade or business, which A operates as a sole proprietor. A's business generates only domestic source income. A's investment portfolio consists of several less than 10 percent stock investments. Certain stocks in which A's adjusted basis is $40,000 generate domestic source income and other stocks in which A's adjusted basis is $60,000 generate foreign source passive income. In addition, A owns his personal residence, which is subject to a mortgage in the amount of $100,000. All interest expense incurred with respect to A's

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