Computer Organization and Design: The Hardware/Software Interface

Pirmais vāks
Elsevier, 2004. gada 7. aug. - 656 lappuses

This best selling text on computer organization has been thoroughly updated to reflect the newest technologies. Examples highlight the latest processor designs, benchmarking standards, languages and tools.

As with previous editions, a MIPs processor is the core used to present the fundamentals of hardware technologies at work in a computer system. The book presents an entire MIPS instruction set—instruction by instruction—the fundamentals of assembly language, computer arithmetic, pipelining, memory hierarchies and I/O.

A new aspect of the third edition is the explicit connection between program performance and CPU performance. The authors show how hardware and software components--such as the specific algorithm, programming language, compiler, ISA and processor implementation--impact program performance. Throughout the book a new feature focusing on program performance describes how to search for bottlenecks and improve performance in various parts of the system. The book digs deeper into the hardware/software interface, presenting a complete view of the function of the programming language and compiler--crucial for understanding computer organization. A CD provides a toolkit of simulators and compilers along with tutorials for using them.

For instructor resources click on the grey "companion site" button found on the right side of this page.
This new edition represents a major revision.
New to this edition:

* Entire Text has been updated to reflect new technology
* 70% new exercises.
* Includes a CD loaded with software, projects and exercises to support courses using a number of tools
* A new interior design presents defined terms in the margin for quick reference
* A new feature, "Understanding Program Performance" focuses on performance from the programmer's perspective
* Two sets of exercises and solutions, "For More Practice" and "In More Depth," are included on the CD
* "Check Yourself" questions help students check their understanding of major concepts
* "Computers In the Real World" feature illustrates the diversity of uses for information technology
*More detail below...
 

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LibraryThing Review

Lietotāja recenzija  - Tobias.Bruell - LibraryThing

The book first gives an introduction into instruction-set-architectures using MIPS. Then in Chapter 4 a processor is constructed which implements (a part of) the MIPS architecture, while skipping many ... Lasīt pilnu pārskatu

LibraryThing Review

Lietotāja recenzija  - sloDavid - LibraryThing

Concepts are mostly explained well, but there are a couple things that *really* grate: 1-- the authors constantly reference material in the appendix on the CD. And 2-- this is the third edition and ... Lasīt pilnu pārskatu

Saturs

Chapter 1 Computer Abstractions and Technology
1
COMPUTERS IN THE REAL WORLD Information Technology for the 4 Billion without IT
44
Language of the Computer
46
COMPUTERS IN THE REAL WORLD Helping Save Our Environment with Data
156
Chapter 3 Arithmetic for Computers
158
COMPUTERS IN THE REAL WORLD Reconstructing the Ancient World
236
Chapter 4 Assessing and Understanding Performance
238
COMPUTERS IN THE REAL WORLD Moving People Faster and More Safely
280
Chapter 6 Enhancing Performance with Pipelining
368
COMPUTERS IN THE REAL WORLD Mass Communication without Gatekeepers
464
Exploiting Memory Hierarchy
466
COMPUTERS IN THE REAL WORLD Saving the Worlds Art Treasures
562
Chapter 8 Storage Networks and Other Peripherals
564
COMPUTERS IN THE REAL WORLD Saving Lives through Better Diagnosis
622
Glossary
G-1
Index
I-1

Datapath and Control
282
COMPUTERS IN THE REAL WORLD Empowering the Disabled
366
Further Reading
FX-1
Autortiesības

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Populāri fragmenti

x. lappuse - The most beautiful thing we can experience is the mysterious. It is the source of all true art and science. He to whom this emotion is a stranger, who can no longer pause to wonder and stand rapt in awe, is as good as dead: his eyes are closed.
xviii. lappuse - It is a profoundly erroneous truism, repeated by all copy-books and by eminent people when they are making speeches, that we should cultivate the habit of thinking of what we are doing. The precise opposite is the case. Civilization advances by extending the number of important operations which we can perform without thinking about them.
17. lappuse - I think of a computer display as a window on Alice's Wonderland in which a programmer can depict either objects that obey well-known natural laws or purely imaginary objects that follow laws he has written into his program. Through computer displays I have landed an airplane on the deck of a moving carrier, observed a nuclear particle hit a potential well, flown in a rocket at nearly the speed of light and watched a computer reveal its innermost workings.
10. lappuse - Paris they simply stared when I spoke to them in French; I never did succeed in making those idiots understand their own language.
34. lappuse - Where a calculator on the ENIAC is equipped with 18,000 vacuum tubes and weighs 30 tons, computers in the future may have only 1,000 vacuum tubes and perhaps weigh only 1.5 tons.

Par autoru (2004)

ACM named David A. Patterson a recipient of the 2017 ACM A.M. Turing Award for pioneering a systematic, quantitative approach to the design and evaluation of computer architectures with enduring impact on the microprocessor industry. David A. Patterson is the Pardee Chair of Computer Science, Emeritus at the University of California Berkeley. His teaching has been honored by the Distinguished Teaching Award from the University of California, the Karlstrom Award from ACM, and the Mulligan Education Medal and Undergraduate Teaching Award from IEEE. Patterson received the IEEE Technical Achievement Award and the ACM Eckert-Mauchly Award for contributions to RISC, and he shared the IEEE Johnson Information Storage Award for contributions to RAID. He also shared the IEEE John von Neumann Medal and the C & C Prize with John Hennessy. Like his co-author, Patterson is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Computer History Museum, ACM, and IEEE, and he was elected to the National Academy of Engineering, the National Academy of Sciences, and the Silicon Valley Engineering Hall of Fame. He served on the Information Technology Advisory Committee to the U.S. President, as chair of the CS division in the Berkeley EECS department, as chair of the Computing Research Association, and as President of ACM. This record led to Distinguished Service Awards from ACM, CRA, and SIGARCH.

ACM named John L. Hennessy a recipient of the 2017 ACM A.M. Turing Award for pioneering a systematic, quantitative approach to the design and evaluation of computer architectures with enduring impact on the microprocessor industry. John L. Hennessy is a Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at Stanford University, where he has been a member of the faculty since 1977 and was, from 2000 to 2016, its tenth President. Prof. Hennessy is a Fellow of the IEEE and ACM; a member of the National Academy of Engineering, the National Academy of Science, and the American Philosophical Society; and a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Among his many awards are the 2001 Eckert-Mauchly Award for his contributions to RISC technology, the 2001 Seymour Cray Computer Engineering Award, and the 2000 John von Neumann Award, which he shared with David Patterson. He has also received seven honorary doctorates.

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