History of English Humour: With an Introduction Upon Ancient Humour, 1. sējums

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Hurst and Blackett, 1878 - 712 lappuses

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268. lappuse - What things have we seen Done at the Mermaid! heard words that have been So nimble, and so full of subtle flame, As if that every one (from whence they came) Had meant to put his whole wit in a jest, And had resolved to live a fool the rest Of his dull life...
36. lappuse - All they that see me, laugh me to scorn: they shoot out the lip, they shake the head, saying, 8 He trusted on the Lord that he Would deliver him : let him deliver him, seeing he delighted in him.
259. lappuse - Unto the general disposition ; As when some one peculiar quality Doth so possess a man, that it doth draw All his affects, his spirits, and his powers, In their confluctions, all to run one way, This may be truly said to be a humour.
295. lappuse - Tis resolved, for Nature pleads that he Should only rule who most resembles me. Shadwell alone my perfect image bears, Mature in dulness from his tender years ; Shadwell alone of all my sons is he Who stands confirmed in full stupidity. The rest to some faint meaning make pretence, But Shadwell never deviates into sense.
274. lappuse - twill be eleven ; And so, from hour to hour, we ripe and ripe, And then, from hour to hour, we rot and rot ; And thereby hangs a tale.
33. lappuse - And Samson went and caught three hundred foxes, and took firebrands, and turned tail to tail, and put a firebrand in the midst between two tails. And when he had set the brands on fire, he let them go into the standing corn of the Philistines, and burnt up both the shocks, and also the standing corn, with the vineyards and olives.
230. lappuse - Now let them drink till they nod and wink, Even as good fellows should do; They shall not miss to have the bliss Good ale doth bring men to ; And all poor souls that have...
359. lappuse - Dorinda's sparkling wit and eyes United cast too fierce a light, Which blazes high, but quickly dies, Pains not the heart, but hurts the sight. Love is a calmer, gentler joy, Smooth are his looks, and soft his pace, Her Cupid is a blackguard boy, That runs his link full in your face.
26. lappuse - WHEN the Lord turned again the captivity of Zion, we were like them that dream. Then was our mouth filled with laughter, and our tongue with singing: then said they among the heathen, The Lord hath done great things for them. The Lord hath done great things for us ; whereof we are glad.
293. lappuse - Nothing! thou elder brother ev'n to Shade, Thou hadst a being ere the world was made, And (well fixt) art alone of ending not afraid. Ere time and place were, time and place were not, When primitive Nothing something straight begot, Then all proceeded from the great united — What.

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