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The number of tons going from tide-water in 1852 was as follows, viz:

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Aggregate statement of the tonnage and value of the property which came

to and went from the Hudson river on the canals in the years 1851 an'ı
1852.

Years.

Tons.

Value.

1852..
1851..

2,756, 349
2,452, 486

$185, 789, 546 00
143, 145,297 00

Increase....

303,863

42,644, 249 00

TRADE OF CINCINNATI.

We are indebted to the Cincinnati Price Current for the following
statistics:

IMPORTS INTO CINCINNATI.

Commencing September 1, 1852, and the same time in 1851.

Articles.

Past week.

Totals.

Last year.

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27, 467
1, 146
1,060

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Apples, green..
Beef..
Beef..
Bagging.
Barley.
Beans.
Butter..
Butter.
Blooms..
Bran, &c..
Candles..
Corn....
Cornmeal.
Cider...
Cheese..
Cheese.
Cotton.

.. barrels
firkins and kegs..

. , tons.
...sacks.

..boxes..
.. bushels....

872

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Coffee.....

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Codfish.
Cooperage.
Eggs.
Flour..
Feathers..
Fish, sund..
Fish...
Fruit, dried..
Grease..
Glass.
Glassware.
Hemp.....
Hides, loose...
Hides, green.
Hay....
Herring.
Hogs...
Hops..
Iron and steel..

Do....
Do...

... bales.....
..backs...
..drums..

. pieces ..
boxes and barrels..

.barrels...
..sacks..

..barrels....
kegs and kits..

..bushels
..barrels....

.boxes....

..packages...
bundles and bales..

6,838

40
19

3
4, 809

423
1,039

7
6,027

205
9,903

54
301
139
802

5
1,018
1,013

115

769
1,300

98

11,081

513
219

4
90, 193
17, 771
6,265
9,066

1, 434
33, 994

49
228, 305
6,798
761

52
139, 805

5, 652
48, 065

556
97,383

2,584
197, 653

4,771
5, 386
1,432
12,907

643
19,404
14,963

6, 243
13, 121
17,695
1,099

7,357
192, 281

1,756
110, 172
30, 045

2,197
19, 691
16, 979
6,915
7,470

1,561
24, 594

1,636
358,923

410
29, 704
20,856
41, 147
3, 201

342

115, 832

4,932
3, 443
8, 288

674
57, 336

70
263, 290
2,556
828

27
164,764

3,920
29,015

88
76,212

439
177, 707

2,322
7,066

384
8, 405

345
22, 229
13, 350
4,392
9,713
51, 620
2,524

1,985
106,662

1, 173
55, 131
15,937

4,023
20, 075
7,557
4,964
3,574

311
22,071

407
40, 805

1,091
18, 494
13,612
18,308
2, 267

340

9,964

126
3,553
1,279

137

Lead.....

-pounds..
,bales
.boxes..
.. heads.....

,bales
..pieces...

bundles....
..tons......
•pigs..
.barrels.
. kegs....
..bundles....
..boxes......

berrels....
hhds. and pipes..

Lard.

Do...
Leather.
Lemons.
Lime.....
Liquors..
Merchandise and sundries.

Do.....
Molasses..
Malt....

2, 408
2, 706

286

425

Nails....

Oil.....
Oranges..

..packages...

.tons.
..barrels.
...bushels
.kegs...

.bariels...
.boxes and barrels..

36
18,400

7,211

1,031

178
119

TRADE OF CINCINNATI-Continued.

Articles.

Past week.

Totals.

Last year.

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Oakum..
Oats.
Oil cake....
Pork and bacon.

Do.....

Do...
Pork, in bulk.
Potatoes.
Pig metal.
Pimento and pepper
Rye.....
Rozin, &c.....
Raisins..
Rope, twine, &c.
Rice....
Sugar..
Do....
Do...
Seed, flax.
Do. grass..
Do. hemp.
Salt.

Do.....
Shot.
Tea...
Tobacco.

Do..

Do...
Tallow.
Wines...

Do.
Wheat.
Wool.
Whiskey..
Cotton yarn.

Do...

1, 293
624, 005

425
137
68
74
124
770

6

88
1,333

14
25
458
834

1,959
84,644
14,000
6, 734

571
14,537
4,231,392

6, 884
9, 267
2,518
11,769

5, 225
13, 266
2, 179

949
9,234
6,899

975
24, 828
6,290

34
43, 782
35,005

703
11, 183
2,861

1,034
20, 329
2,375
3,412

3, 187
169, 214

2, 305
94,563

2,097
29,140

473
47,545
6,000
2, 408

35
5, 025
1,386,216

5,959
4,517

223
17,017

3, 490
13,233

249

172
4, 637
4,283
1,090
17,970
2,071

. tierces
..hhds..
.. barrels..
.boxes...
.barrels.

25

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11,410
21, 263

683
4,049
1,514

447
8,712
1,068

456
1,377
169, 754

672
88, 147
2,182
28,356

EXPORTS FROM CINCINNATI.

Commencing September 1, 1852, and same time in 1851.

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Articles.

Past week.

Totals.

Last year.

Apples, green..
Alcohol.....

.. barrels....

Beef.......

Do...
Beans
Brooms.
Butter.

Do..
Bran, &c.
Bagging.
Corn..
-Corn meal.

239

.tierces

.barrels..
...dozen...

...barrels...
.firkins and kegs..

...sacks.....

..pieces..
... sacks....

.barrels....

73
1, 187

664
122
105
166
765
781
128

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TRADE OF CINCINNA11-Continued.

Articles.

Past week.

Totals.

Last year.

2,144
4, 805

8 68, 394 33, 477

Cheese.....

Do.... Candles. Cattle. Cotton.. Coffee.... Cooperage. Eggs.. Flour.. Feathers. Fruit, dried. Grease... Grass seed.. Horses.. Hay... Hemp.. Hides.

Do... Iron. Do. Do. Lard...

Do.. Lard oils. Linseed oil.. Molasses.

100

652 2,432

215 14,631

241 475 120 74

7 50 18

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.......

117 4,047 1,120

98 5, 896 13, 381

861

46 1,617 260

60 499 1,095 1, 236 13, 142

2, 136 12, 148 25,138

759 103, 352 2, 429

173 1,054 849

95 117

476 19,924

4, 789 35,907 9,868 2,532 12, 767 32,311 6,395 2, 408 8,962

377 1,058 6,021 5,722 2,750 33,291

410
804,785

1,860
8,771

Oil cake.....

8 84, 581 45, 520

294 3,066 24,094 68,838

1,698 164,941

4,565 2, 436 1,956 2,124 623

237 1,307 5,253 11, 478 75, 529 19,079

4,572 22,872 53,667 8, 689 3,267 15,502 1,843 1, 609 7,255 9, 201 4,666 62, 373

92 382,037

5, 703 12, 132

60 7,412 18,714 19,819

1,952 377, 428

3, 344 22, 194 38, 084 12,406 7,512 2, 405 14,088 2, 603

173 3, 142 90, 818 4,886

1,511 25, 662 22,588

677

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69, 600

348
434

Oats..
Potatoes.
Pork and bacon.

Do...

Do....
Pork...

Do. in bulk
Rope, &c..
Soap...
Sheep.
Sugar.
Salt.

Do....
Seed, flax....
Sundry merchandise.
Do.

merchandise.....
Do. liquors.....
Do. manufactures.

Do. produce....
Starch...
Tallow..
Tobacco..

Do......

Do.....
Vinegar.
Whiskey.
Wool..

Do...
White lead....
Pieces castings..

Do....

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726 719 917

27 11,500

50 1,851 1, 260

660 668 171 406

5

3,712 11, 274 8,316

547 93,202

2, 449 10,127

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24, 253
5,171
2, 108
7,088
1, 161

37
1, 207
71, 305
1,017

106 3,554

132

154 447 27

17,092
4, 464

453

....

...casks.....

..boxes...
..boxes...
..heads.

.bales..
.. sacks...
. pieces....

.barrels.
...barrels,

..sacks... .bushels ...

.barrels... ... barrels..

..heads.. ..bales. ..bales

pounds. .No... .pieces.. .bundles... .tons.... ..barrels...

kegs... .. barrels...

..barrels.... ...barrels...

.tons..... ..sacks... ...barrels. ...hhds.....

..tierces .. barrels, ...boxes... ..pounds... ..packages.

.boxes... ...heads.

..hhds.....
....barrels.

..sacks.
..barrels....
.. packages...
.. tons ...
.. barrels....
..pieces....

.packages.. ........boxes.....

.....

...kegs and boxes..

..hhds...

.....bales..
....barrels

.barrels..
.bales.....
.pounds...
.kegs. .

....

....

....tons.......

IX.

THE COTTON TRADE.

BY c. F. M'CAY, UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA.

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The course of the cotton trade during the past year has been steady and uniform. The season opened in September and October at rates a trifle higher than were realized in December; but, from January forwards, the market slowly advanced until it is now a little higher than it was a year ago. The price at Liverpool of fair cotton, on the 1st of September, 1851, was 5 d.; in October it was 5ļd.; in January, 5d.; in March, 5 d.; in May, 5d.; in July, 5 d.; and 6d. in September, 1852. The increased estimates of the crop depressed the price early in the season; but the immense consumption in every part of the worldin the United States, in England, and on the Continent-encouraged the sellers to demand higher rates; and these have been maintained in spite of the promise of another large crop for the ensuing year. The rates now current are not high; but they are above the average. For the thirteen years from 1840 to 1852, the whole American exports, (see Table I, at the end of this article,) amounting to nearly ten thousand millions of pounds, have been sold at an average price of eight and a half cents. The price of good middling, at Charleston, is now, October 29th, nine and a half cents. Instead of declining below the usual rates, the market has advanced, after receiving the largest crop ever produced, and with the prospect of another fully as large. What has maintained these prices? Are the causes temporary or permanent? Will they continue for the present year? Or is their effect already past? In attempting an answer to these questions it may be remarked:

1st. That the advance is not due to the fact that lower rates are not remunerative. From 1840 to 1844, when the average (see Table I) was only eight cents, the stocks were constantly increasing. The production outrun the consumption. This led to lower prices, which discouraged planting, and at the same time increased the demand of the manufacturers. From 1845 to 1849 the average price (see Table I) was only seven and a half cents. The surplus stocks then became small and prices advanced. Thus it appeared that an average of eight cents, from year to year, stimulated production so that the supply exceeded the demand, while seven and a half cents produced an opposite effect. The present rates, therefore, are more than sufficient to pay the planter a proper profit on his investment. And the general advance on land and negroes, throughout the Southern States, confirms the conclusion

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