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The foregoing specimens of type are given as ordinarily set, without spacing or “leads ” between the lines. The appearance of a page, however, is very materially changed by the use of thin pieces of metal called “leads ” placed between the lines of type, and this gives to the page a more open effect. This difference will be appreciated by comparing the two styles of small pica.

Leaded.

Solid. Archives of Medicine for 1883, Archives of Medicine for 1883, a bi-monthly journal, edited by a bi-monthly journal, edited by Dr. E. C. SEGUIN and Dr. R.

Dr. E. C. SEGUIN and Dr. R.

W. AMIDON, with the assistance W. AMIDON, with the assistance

of many prominent physicians of many prominent physicians in this country and abroad, in this country and abroad, enters upon the fifth year of enters upon the fifth year of its existence. The Archives

vy its existence. The Archives of Medicine will continue to be

published every two months. Medicine will continue to be

Each number is handsomely published every two months. printed in large octavo form, on Each number is handsomely heavy paper, and contains from printed in large octavo form, on 104 to 112 pages.

Whenever heavy paper, and contains from necessary, illustrations of vari

ous sorts will be freely inserted, 104 to 112 pages.

Whenever

as in the past. The Archives necessary, illustrations of vari

would make this special claim ous sorts will be freely inserted, upon the medical profession, as in the past. The Archives that it is made up solely of would make this special claim original matter, in the shape of upon the medical profession, ticles, Reviews, and Records of

Original Articles, Editorial Arthat it is made up solely of Original Cases. original matter, in the shape of Original Articles, Editorial Articles, Reviews, and Records of Original Cases.

The sizes of type generally used for book work are pica, small pica, long primer, bourgeois, and brevier.

Measuring Type.-The standard of measure in typesetting in the United States is the em, or the square of the

type used.

type the

In other words, the compositor is paid for the number of ems he sets. Of course the smaller the greater the number of ems in a given space.

This should be carefully borne in mind, for it not infrequently occurs that after a work has been estimated to make a given number of pages in a certain type, the author decides to use smaller type, and he is then surprised that the reduction in the number of pages does not make the cost of his work correspondingly less. As a matter of fact there will be the same number of ems whether the type be large or small, and the compositor, justly, receives the same for one hundred pages of long primer as for one hundred and twenty pages of pica. When the type in a book is mixed, each size is measured for itself.

Giving Out Copy.-In setting the type the MS. is divided up by the foreman of the composing-room into small divisions called “takes," and these are handed out in rotation to the compositors engaged upon the work.

Type-Setting.–The type is set up by the compositor in what is called a “composing-stick,” this being held in the left hand, while the right hand dexterously takes the type from the case, and arranges the letters in accordance with the “copy.” This “stick” holds a number of lines of type, and as it becomes filled, its contents are carefully lifted into a long tray called a “galley.” When the copy contained in the "take" is finished, the type is secured and placed upon the proof press, and two impressions taken from it,—the compositor having first placed at the head of the "galley” his office number, in order that he

proper

credit for the work done.

Office Proof.—One of these proofs is now sent to the proof-reader with the copy, the other being retained by the compositor as a voucher for his work. The reader now goes carefully through the office proof,” being assisted by

may receive

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a subordinate, who reads to him, word by word, the author's MS. This proof is then returned to the compositor, who is compelled to make in it all the corrections needed to make the proof conform to the copy. As the compositor is not allowed any thing extra for these corrections, it is manifestly his interest to have his proof as “clean” or correct as possible.

Author's Proof.-After these corrections are made by the compositor he then “pulls” another proof, and this, marked “Revise,” or “Author's,” is sent to an assistant reader, who compares it with the office proof” to make sure that all the compositor's errors have been properly rectified. The proof is then stamped with the date and despatched with the MS. copy to the author.

Correcting Proof.-On the two following pages is exhibited a specimen page of proof before and after corrections are made. This contains the principal corrections needed in ordinary proof, and the method of marking the same on the margin. If proof is properly marked, it is not necessary

that it should be accompanied by a letter to publisher or printer reiterating these corrections. Indeed, such reiteration is always confusing and troublesome.

In correcting proof use a pen in preference to a pencil, and avoid all unnecessary marks on the margin of the proof. General directions to the printer should in all cases be written upon a separate sheet, and if they are sent by mail, they should be placed in separate envelopes. If enclosed with the proof, they subject this to the payment of letter postage.

SPECIMEN OF CORRECTED PROOF

FABLE, IL

The Wolf and the Lamb.
ON

NE hot, suliry day, a Wolf and a Lamb' happened to come, just at the

same time, to quench their thirst in the stream of a clear silver brook; that ran tumbling down the the side of a rocky mountain. The Wolf stood g

upon the h&igher ground, and the Lamb at some distance from him down the

current. However, the Wolf, having a mind to pick a quarrel with him, 9 # asked himwhat he meant by disturbing the water, and making it so muddy # that he could not drink; and, atithe same time, demanded satisfaction. u The Lamb, frightened' at thisthreatening Sharge, told him, in: a tone as w mild as, possible, that, with humble submission, he could not conceive how s x that could be ; since the y ater which he drank.-ran down from the Wolf to

him, and therefore it could not be disturbed so far. up 5. No al fo Be that as it will,” replies the Wolf,

* you are a rascal, and I have been Rouan told that you treated me with ill language behind my back, about half a year

lead w.f. ago."

Upon my yord,” says the · Lamb, the time you mention was be. fore I was born.” The Wolf, finding it to purpose ng to argue any longer to t. against, tdth, fell into a great passion, Snarling and foaming at the mouth,

I lead las if he had been 'mad ; and drawing nearer to the. Jamb, “Sirrah," says he, “if it was not you, it was 'your father, and that is all the same. Qy

ece cops So he seized the poor innocent, tore it to pieces, and made a meal of it.

Stalico ÆSOP'S FABLES.

the streamin

< lead

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helpless thing

CORRECTIONS OF THE PRESS.

for

g (dele) Delete,

take out or expunge.
9 Turn a reversed letter.
# A space, or more space, between words, letters, or lines.
O Less space, or no space, between words or letters.
Lor Carry a word further to the left or to the right.

Indent.

Elevate a letter, word, or character that is sunk below the proper level. u Sink or depress a letter, word, or letters raised above the proper level.

Shows that a portion of a paragraph projects laterally beyond the rest.

Directs attention to a quadrat or space which improperly appears.
X or + Directs attention to a broken or imperfect type.
[ Bring a word or words to the beginning of a line ; also, make a new paragraph.

SPECIMEN OF PROOF AFTER CORRECTION.

FABLE II.

THE WOLF AND THE LAMB.

ONE hot, sultry day, a Wolf and a Lamb happened to come, just at the

same time, to quench their thirst in the stream of a clear silver brook, that ran tumbling down the the side of a rocky mountain. The Wolf stood upon the higher ground, and the Lamb at some distance from him down the current, However, the Wolf, having a mind to pick a quarrel with him, asked him what he meant by disturbing the water, and making it so muddy that he could not drink ; and, at the same time, demanded satisfaction. The Lamb, frightened at this threatening charge, told him, in a tone as mild as possible, that, with humble submission, he could not conceive how that could be ; since the water which he drank, ran down from the Wolf to him, and therefore it could not be disturbed so far up the stream. “Be that as it will,” replies the Wolf, “ you are a rascal, and I have been told that you treated me with ill language behind my back, about half a year ago.”

Upon my word,” says the Lamb, “the time you mention was before I was born.” The Wolf, finding it to no purpose to argue any longer against truth, fell into a great passion, snarling and foaming at the mouth, as if he had been mad ; and drawing nearer to the lamb,

Sirrah”

says he, “if it was not you, it was your father, and that is all one. So he seized the poor innocent, helpless thing, tore it to pieces, and made a meal of it.

Æsop's Fables.
CORRECTIONS OF THE PRESS (CONTINUED).
Make a new paragraph.

Change from Italic to Roman, or from Roman to Italic, as the case may be. = Put in small Capitals. = Put in Capitals.

The other marks are self-explanatory, but the following abbreviations, used

in correcting proof-sheets, require explanations : w. f. Wrong font; used when a letter is of a wrong size or style. tr. Transpose. 1. c. Lower case ; i. e., put in small or common letters a word or letter that has

been printed in capitals or small capitals. Q y. or ? Query out, s. c. Words are wanting, see copy.

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