The Least Examined Branch: The Role of Legislatures in the Constitutional State

Pirmais vāks
Richard W. Bauman, Tsvi Kahana
Cambridge University Press, 2006. gada 31. jūl.
Unlike most works in constitutional theory, which focus on the role of the courts, this book addresses the role of legislatures in a regime of constitutional democracy. Bringing together some of the world's leading constitutional scholars and political scientists, the book addresses legislatures in democratic theory, legislating and deliberating in the constitutional state, constitution-making by legislatures, legislative and popular constitutionalism, and the dialogic role of legislatures, both domestically with other institutions and internationally with other legislatures. The book offers theoretical perspectives as well as case studies of several types of legislation from the United States and Canada. It also addresses the role of legislatures both under the Westminster model and under a separation of powers system.
 

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Saturs

I
15
II
33
III
45
IV
76
V
93
VI
125
VII
139
VIII
155
XV
320
XVI
355
XVII
378
XVIII
385
XIX
396
XX
411
XXI
431
XXII
452

IX
181
X
198
XI
214
XII
229
XIII
273
XIV
294
XXIII
468
XXIV
480
XXV
499
XXVI
519
XXVII
532
XXVIII
547

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Populāri fragmenti

16. lappuse - First principle: each person is to have an equal right to the most extensive total system of equal basic liberties compatible with a similar system of liberty for all. Second principle: social and economic inequalities are to be arranged so that they are both: (a) to the greatest benefit of the least advantaged, consistent with the just savings principle, and (b) attached to offices and positions open to all under conditions of fair equality of opportunity.
28. lappuse - Parliament is not a congress of ambassadors from different and hostile interests ; which interests each must maintain, as an agent and advocate, against other agents and advocates ; but parliament is a deliberative assembly of one nation, with one interest, that of the whole ; where, not local purposes, not local prejudices ought to guide, but the general good, resulting from the general reason of the whole.

Par autoru (2006)

Richard W. Bauman is Professor of Law at the University of Alberta where he is also Chair of the Management Board of the Centre for Constitutional Studies. He was educated at the University of Alberta, Dalhousie University, Nova Scotia, and the University of Oxford. His most recent book is Ideology and Community in the First Wave of Critical Legal Studies. He has published in law journals in Canada, the US, and South Africa.

Tsvi Kahana is an assistant Professor of Law at Queen's University, Ontario. He has taught courses at the University of Alberta, the University of Toronto, and Tel-Aviv University. His work has been published at The University of Toronto Law Journal, The Journal of Canadian Public Administration, Queen's Law Journal, and The Supreme Court Law Review.

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