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Saturs

Echo 1Echo II
44
Testing for Echo II
46
Active Repeater Satellite
47
Relay Spacecraft
48
Relay SpacecraftAntenna Pattern
49
Telstar Spacecraft
50
NASA and A T T Responsibilities for Telstar 15 The A T T Andover Facility 16 Relay Ground Stations
53
SYNCOM Objectives
54
SYNCOM Spacecraft
55
SYNCOM Sequence Launch and Attitude Control 20 SYNCOM Sequence Position Control
57
SYNCOM SequenceFinal PositionAntenna Pattern 22 NASA and DOD Responsibilities for SYNCOM
59
Advanced Research and Development Communications Systems
60
Active Communications Satellites Systems ImprovementLow Alti tude SystemsSynchronous Systems
61
Active Communications Satellites Systems ImprovementLow Alti
62
51
70
52
194
Communications satellite logislation
257
Mar 7 1962
307
Brown Dr Harold Director Defense Research and Engineering
334
Buckley Edmond C Director Tracking and Data Acquisition NASA 758
360
Gilpatric Roswell L Deputy Secretary of Defense III 16
369
Legal Counsel accompanied by Robert Saloschin attorney
379
56
414
Index
475
McGhee George C Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs 143
481
Opening statement of Chairman Robert S Kerr
1
Newell Dr Homer E Director Office of Space Sciences NASA 190
22
57
29
A Basic statistics of Colonel Glenns flight
33
Chronology of Colonel Glenns day February 20 1962
47
59
48
60
54
61
61
E President Kennedys statement February 20 1962
69
G Transcript of Colonel Glenns press conference Cape Canaveral Fla
83
February 24 1962
101
Summary of Project Mercury
107
J Advanced manned space flight Mercury Gemini and Apollo 121
121
NASA authorization for fiscal year 1963
127
NIY سه مات
1
Seamans Jr Dr Robert C Associate Administrator NASA 63740
9
Figure
23
Communications Satellites Launch Schedule
26
AtomicPowered Synchronous Satellite
27
The Space Vehicle
28
Bell System Overseas Telephone Service
29
StationtoStation Day Rate Message Toll Telephone Service
30
15 1962
48
Major NASA flight missions calendar year 1961 JulyDecember 49
49
EXPLORER XIGamma ray satellite 1 51
51
Orbiting solar observatory 53
53
Detailed cloud analysis September 11 1961 56
57
International satellite programs 58
58
International sounding rocket programs 60
60
Tracking and data acquisition stations abroad 62
62
64
64
Space science 66
66
Scientific satellites and sounding rockets 68
68
Unmanned lunar exploration 70
70
Planetary exploration 72
72
Light and medium launch vehicles 74
74
Space science fiscal year 1963 budget estimate 77
77
Applications 79
79
Meteorological satellites 80
80
Communications satellites 83
83
Applications fiscal year 1963 budget estimate 88
88
Manned space flight 90
90
MERCURY 3 orbits 91
91
Oneday manned flight 92
92
GEMINI 93
93
96
96
APPOLLO 97
97
Large launch vehicle and liquid propulsion development 98
98
Manned Spacecraft Center Houston Tex 101
101
Michoud plant New Orleans La 103
103
Mississippi test facility 104
104
APOLLO launch complex 106
106
Manned space flight fiscal year 1963 budget estimate 107
107
Advanced research and technology 110
110
Aircraft and missile technology 112
112
Spacecraft technology 114
114
Launch vehicle technology 115
115
Nuclear systems technology 116
116
Chemical propulsion technology 118
118
Advanced research and technology fiscal year 1963 budget estimate 120
120
Tracking facilities 122
122
Tracking and data acquisition fiscal year 1963 budget estimate 124
124
131
131
tional Aeronautics and Space Administration 190
190
Lunar landing areas 259
259
Planetary programTarget milestones 261
261
Planetary program opportunities 263
263
Planetary program status 265
265
Planetary programSpacecraft 267
266
Planetary programSpacecraft 269
269
Planetary programSpacecraft 271
271
Flight paths in planet vicinity 273
273
Exploring Venus 275
275
Exploring Mars 277
277
Interplanetary program 279 281
279
Biosciences
280
Biosciences programs 283 285
282
Search for extraterrestrial life
284
Detection of extraterrestrial life 287
287
Detection of extraterrestrial life 289
289
Planetary environmental simulation 291
291
BIOS biological investigation of space 293
293
SCOUT 296
296
SCOUT performance 299
298
SCOUT missions 301
301
DELTA launching 303
303
DELTA 305
305
DELTA missions 0 307
307
ATLASAGENA B launches RANGER 1 309
309
311
311
AGENA B missions 313
313
CENTAUR 315
315
CENTAUR inflight separation 317
316
CENTAUR AMR Launch Complex 36 319
318
CENTAUR stage at AMR launch pad 321
321
CENTAUR on launch pad for first flight 323
323
CENTAUR engine in Lewis Altitude Facility 325 327
324
Test firing of CENTAUR engines
326
Network coverage unmanned missions 329
329
Tracking and data acquisition requirements 331
331
NASA 360
360
Manned lunar landingproject APOLLO 371
371
Injection into lunar trajectory 381 383
381
En route 153 Radiation considerations 384
384
Midcourse correction 385
385
Crew activities 386
386
Into a lunar orbit 387
387
Lunar landing 389 390
389
Lunar exploration 391
390
Lunar takeoff
391
Return to earthMidcourse correction 393 394
393
Reentry corridor 395
395
Reentry 396
396
Landing iiii 398
398
Recovery 399
399
The program 401
401
Manned space flight 403
403
Project MERCURY flight test results 405
405
Project MERCURY 407
407
Figure Page 171 Project MERCURY 409
409
Project MERCURY 410
410
172a Project MERCURY 412
412
MERCURY tracking network 414
414
Bermuda 415
415
Grand Canary 416
416
Kano Nigeria 417
417
Woomera Australia 418
418
Canton Island 419
419
Mercury Control Center 421
421
Manned Oneday mission 423
423
Manned oneday mission 424
424
Project GEMINI 426
426
Comparison of manned spacecraft 427
427
Project GEMINILaunch vehicles 430
430
Project GEMINIFlight mission 432
432
Project APOLLO 434
434
Project APOLLOThree missions 436
436
438
438
APOLLO spacecraftThree configurations 440
440
Direct mission 442
442
Earth orbit rendezvous technique 444
444
Earth orbit rendezvous 445
445
Lunar orbit rendezvous technique 447
447
Lunar orbit rendezvous 448
448
Mission selection 450
450
Engines for manned flight 452
452
Spacecraft propulsion 455
455
1st SATURN launch 457
457
Project APOLLOLaunch vehicle requirements 458
458
Mission components 460
460
Manned Space Flight Organization 462
462
Man and Aerospace Medicine Organization 465
465
Launch Vehicles and Rocket Engines Organization 467
467
Flight Mission and Spacecraft Organization 469
469
Location of major participants 471
471
Manned space flight major activities 472
472
Marshall Space Flight Center Huntsville Ala 474
474
Cape Canaveral 477
477
ADVANCED SATURN launch complexCape Canaveral 479
479
NOVA launch complexCape Canaveral 481
481
Direct approach
492
NASA advanced research and technology
506
Functions of NASA program offices for research and technology
507
Advanced research and technology areas of activity
509
Advanced research and technologyFiscal year 1963 budget estimate
510
Aeronautical researchCivil and military
512
Typical VTOL performance
514
Long range and short range VTOL application
515
VSTOL aircraft problem areas
516
Speed bumps
518
Supersonic transport research requirements
520
Multicapability aircraft
522
Multicapability aircraft research requirements
524
X15 research airplane
526
Hypersonic cruise aircraft
528
Hypersonic cruise propulsion requirements
529
X15 on B52
530
Space vehicle research and technology
541
Program areas
543
Launch vehicle technology
545
Liquid rocket technology
546
Spacecraft launch configurations
548
Launch vehicle buffeting
550
Spacecraft technology
552
Meteoroid flight experiments
553
Figure Page 297 ECHO IECHO II
689
ECHO II
691
Testing for ECHO II
693
Active repeater satellite
695
RELAY Spacecraft
697
RELAY Spacecraft Antenna Pattern
698
303 TELSTAR Spacecraft
700
NASA and A T T responsibilities for TELSTAR
701
The A T T Andover Facility
703
The A T T Andover Facility
704
Relay ground stations
706
SYNCOM Objectives
708
SYNCOM spacecraft
709
SYNCOM sequence launch and attitude control
710
SYNCOM sequence position control
712
SYNCOM sequence Final positionAntenna pattern
713
NASA and DOD responsibilities for SYNCOM
715
Advanced research and developmentCommunications systems
717
Active communications satellites systems improvement
719
Active communications satellites systems improvement
720
Communications satellites launch schedule
722
Industrial applications
724
TIROS III hurricane data
727
Tracking and data acquisition
759
Summary of demands on T D A systems
761
MERCURY tracking data acquisition net
763
Earth satellite instrumentation
765
Minitrack
766
Alaska Data Acquisition Facility
768
Reception capability of antenna systems
769
NASASAO optical tracking net
771
Deep space net
773
Launch area instrumentation
775
Communications net
777
Minitrack limitations
779
Range and rangerate system 780
780
Deep space data requirements
782
Deep space antenna system capabilities
783
Manned Aight net multiple orbits
785
Data requirements from large satellites in 1964
787
Major NASA data antenna requirements
789
Appendix ASpace program of the U S Weather Bureau
797
Appendix BAdditional material supplied by the Department of Defense
806
Appendix ENASA announcement of maximum of six orbits planned
824

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334. lappuse - ... contract" means any actual or proposed contract, agreement, understanding, or other arrangement, and includes any assignment, substitution of parties, or subcontract executed or entered into thereunder; and (3) the term "made", when used in relation to any invention, means the conception or first actual reduction to practice of such invention.
147. lappuse - States to establish, in conjunction and in cooperation with other countries, as expeditiously as practicable a commercial communications satellite system, as part of an improved global communications network...
2. lappuse - There is hereby authorized to be created a communications satellite corporation for profit which will not be an agency or establishment of the United States Government. The corporation shall be subject to the provisions of this Act and, to the extent consistent with this Act, to the District of Columbia Business Corporation Act.
329. lappuse - That, subject only to the provisions of the Tennessee Valley Authority Act of 1933, as amended, the Corporation is authorized to make such expenditures and to enter into such contracts, agreements, and arrangements, upon such terms and conditions and in such manner as it may deem necessary...
68. lappuse - The corporation shall be subject to the provisions of this Act and, to the extent consistent with this Act, to the District of Columbia Business Corporation Act. The right to repeal, alter, or amend this Act at any time is expressly reserved.
128. lappuse - Title to such facilities shall be vested in the United States unless the Administrator determines that the national program of aeronautical and space activities will best be served by vesting title in any such grantee institution or organization.
461. lappuse - National Aeronautics and Space Act of 1958". DECLARATION OF POLICY AND PURPOSE SEC. 102. (a) The Congress hereby declares that it is the policy of the United States that activities in space should be devoted to peaceful purposes for the benefit of all mankind.
139. lappuse - ... during the course of their flight through outer space. The Committee, bearing in mind that its terms of reference refer exclusively to the peaceful uses of outer space, believes that, with this practice, there may have been initiated the recognition or establishment of a generally accepted rule to the effect that, in principle, outer space is, on conditions of equality, freely available for exploration and use by all in accordance with existing or future international law or agreements.
363. lappuse - Government of the sort referred to in clause (1), such invention shall be the exclusive property of the United States, and if such invention is patentable a patent therefor shall be issued to the United States upon application made by the Administrator, unless the Administrator waives all or any part of the rights of the United States to such invention in conformity with the provisions of subsection (f) of this section.
148. lappuse - ... of the corporation with foreign governments or entities or with international bodies as may be appropriate to assure that such relationships shall be consistent with the national interest and foreign policy of the United States; 5. insure that timely arrangements are made under which there can be foreign participation in the establishment and use of a communications satellite system; 6.

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